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Lactose Intolerance

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By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | October 4, 1994
Q: My doctor made a diagnosis of lactose intolerance when told that drinking milk gave me gas, stomach pains and diarrhea. Milk and dairy products are among my favorite foods. Can any tests be done to prove that his diagnosis is correct? Is it necessary for me to stop eating all dairy products?A: Lactose intolerance is a common problem resulting from an inability to digest and absorb lactose, the major sugar contained in milk and dairy products. Lactose can only be absorbed from the intestine after it is broken down into the smaller sugars glucose and galactose by the digestive enzyme lactase.
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By L'Oreal Thompson | February 4, 2013
For Maureen Burke, “gluten-free” is not just the latest diet trend -- it's a way of life. Since being diagnosed with celiac disease in the late 1980s, Burke has wrestled with her intolerance of gluten. And now, as chef and owner of One Dish Cuisine, in Ellicott City, she shares the fruits of her labor over the past two decades with others who suffer from food allergies and intolerances: a restaurant that serves food they can eat. Burke, now 49, was diagnosed with celiac disease and lactose intolerance when she was 25. Back then, celiac disease was relatively unheard of and there weren't many options.
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By Los Angeles Times | September 15, 2006
A report from the American Academy of Pediatrics says that even children who can't easily digest lactose should have dairy foods to make sure they get enough calcium, vitamin D and other nutrients for growth. "A lot of people say they are lactose-intolerant, so they can't have any dairy products," said Dr. Melvin Heyman, chief of pediatric gastroenterology, hepatology and nutrition at University of California, San Francisco Children's Hospital. "But now we know there is a problem with that down the road: osteoporosis," said Heyman, lead author of the report published in the September issue of Pediatrics.
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By Los Angeles Times | September 15, 2006
A report from the American Academy of Pediatrics says that even children who can't easily digest lactose should have dairy foods to make sure they get enough calcium, vitamin D and other nutrients for growth. "A lot of people say they are lactose-intolerant, so they can't have any dairy products," said Dr. Melvin Heyman, chief of pediatric gastroenterology, hepatology and nutrition at University of California, San Francisco Children's Hospital. "But now we know there is a problem with that down the road: osteoporosis," said Heyman, lead author of the report published in the September issue of Pediatrics.
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By Dewitt Bliss and Dewitt Bliss,Sun Staff Writer | October 22, 1994
Dr. Shi-Shung Huang, who was medical director of an East Baltimore health center for 27 years, died Oct. 14 of cancer at his home in Towson. He was 60.Dr. Huang had been medical director of the Greater Baltimore Medical Center's Community and Family Health Center at 1017 E. Baltimore St., where he had supervised care for an estimated 55,000 low-income patients. He retired in 1993."He was really the heart and soul of that place and lent to GBMC credibility in its commitment to the under-served," said Dr. Stephen Amato, chairman of pediatrics at GBMC.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2002
If Darwin was right, and evolution relentlessly weeds out genetic traits that impede a species' survival, then why are a quarter of adult Europeans and 90 percent of Asians unable to digest milk products - a rich, year-round source of protein and energy? Why are 3 percent of American children struggling in school, distracted by attention deficit hyperactivity disorder? Why does one in every 28 people of European descent carry the gene for cystic fibrosis? Scientists don't yet have all the answers.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser | January 16, 1993
Group foresees color of things to comeColors come and go. One year everything from dog dishes to duffel bags comes in jade. The next year jade is junk and you're feeding Fido out of a fuschia bowl.Keeping track of these trends is the mission of the Color Marketing Group, an Arlington, Va.-based nonprofit assemblage of designists and "colorists" that counsels manufacturers on which colors will sell and which will end up being peddled by some liquidator in a Third World country.For 1993, Color Marketing Group is seeing red -- among other hot colors.
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By L'Oreal Thompson | February 4, 2013
For Maureen Burke, “gluten-free” is not just the latest diet trend -- it's a way of life. Since being diagnosed with celiac disease in the late 1980s, Burke has wrestled with her intolerance of gluten. And now, as chef and owner of One Dish Cuisine, in Ellicott City, she shares the fruits of her labor over the past two decades with others who suffer from food allergies and intolerances: a restaurant that serves food they can eat. Burke, now 49, was diagnosed with celiac disease and lactose intolerance when she was 25. Back then, celiac disease was relatively unheard of and there weren't many options.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1998
A coalition of doctors concerned about racial bias is mounting an attack on a national dietary institution: the food pyramid, which calls for a balanced diet of dairy and meat, vegetables and breads.The Washington-based Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) argues that because most members of minority groups can't easily digest milk, the continued inclusion of dairy products as a dietary staple is wrongheaded. They will recommend that the guidelines list dairy as an option and suggest calcium-rich alternatives to milk and cheese.
NEWS
By Gholam Rahman and Gholam Rahman,Cox News Service | April 25, 2007
My niece is allergic to dairy products. Can I make Yorkshire pudding without milk, substituting maybe chicken broth? Originating in the Yorkshire region in the north of England, the pudding originally was made in the fat drippings from a roast beef and then served with gravy as part of a roast beef dinner. Mostly crust, it is raised by steam and eggs in a very hot oven, much like its American cousin, the popover. Although milk plays a part in the puffing up of the batter, I don't think its role is critical.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2002
If Darwin was right, and evolution relentlessly weeds out genetic traits that impede a species' survival, then why are a quarter of adult Europeans and 90 percent of Asians unable to digest milk products - a rich, year-round source of protein and energy? Why are 3 percent of American children struggling in school, distracted by attention deficit hyperactivity disorder? Why does one in every 28 people of European descent carry the gene for cystic fibrosis? Scientists don't yet have all the answers.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1998
A coalition of doctors concerned about racial bias is mounting an attack on a national dietary institution: the food pyramid, which calls for a balanced diet of dairy and meat, vegetables and breads.The Washington-based Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) argues that because most members of minority groups can't easily digest milk, the continued inclusion of dairy products as a dietary staple is wrongheaded. They will recommend that the guidelines list dairy as an option and suggest calcium-rich alternatives to milk and cheese.
NEWS
By Dewitt Bliss and Dewitt Bliss,Sun Staff Writer | October 22, 1994
Dr. Shi-Shung Huang, who was medical director of an East Baltimore health center for 27 years, died Oct. 14 of cancer at his home in Towson. He was 60.Dr. Huang had been medical director of the Greater Baltimore Medical Center's Community and Family Health Center at 1017 E. Baltimore St., where he had supervised care for an estimated 55,000 low-income patients. He retired in 1993."He was really the heart and soul of that place and lent to GBMC credibility in its commitment to the under-served," said Dr. Stephen Amato, chairman of pediatrics at GBMC.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | October 4, 1994
Q: My doctor made a diagnosis of lactose intolerance when told that drinking milk gave me gas, stomach pains and diarrhea. Milk and dairy products are among my favorite foods. Can any tests be done to prove that his diagnosis is correct? Is it necessary for me to stop eating all dairy products?A: Lactose intolerance is a common problem resulting from an inability to digest and absorb lactose, the major sugar contained in milk and dairy products. Lactose can only be absorbed from the intestine after it is broken down into the smaller sugars glucose and galactose by the digestive enzyme lactase.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser | January 16, 1993
Group foresees color of things to comeColors come and go. One year everything from dog dishes to duffel bags comes in jade. The next year jade is junk and you're feeding Fido out of a fuschia bowl.Keeping track of these trends is the mission of the Color Marketing Group, an Arlington, Va.-based nonprofit assemblage of designists and "colorists" that counsels manufacturers on which colors will sell and which will end up being peddled by some liquidator in a Third World country.For 1993, Color Marketing Group is seeing red -- among other hot colors.
NEWS
By Liz Szabo and Liz Szabo,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 21, 2001
NORFOLK, Va. - An epidemic has been sweeping Eastern Virginia Medical School - one that seems to produce different symptoms in every sufferer. Second-year medical student Rodney Sturgeon had a stiff neck, one of the telltale signs of meningitis. Alexandra Carleo thought her spleen was tender, a portent of leukemia. And then there is poor Riz Ahmed. This guy is sure he's suffering not only from apparent lactose intolerance, but possible diabetes as well. Doctors gave them all the same diagnosis: med student's disease, alternately known as Second-Year Syndrome.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 6, 1991
Mike Tunick puts a yellowish chunk into the metal jaws of a device known as a rheometer.Slowly, the machine applies pressure to the chunk. The viselike machine squooshes it, causing it to wiggle. Dials on the instrument flutter; a nearby computer printer spits out the results. Mr. Tunick examines the wavy lines on the printout and within seconds has proven what others could only suspect:The sample is mozzarella cheese.Mr. Tunick, a chemist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Eastern Regional Research Center in Wyndmoor, Pa., has earned a modicum of fame in recent years as one of the nation's foremost food detectives.
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