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Labrador Retriever

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By Gina Spadafori and Gina Spadafori,McClatchy News Service | April 25, 1992
The nation has a new top dog -- the Labrador retriever.Based on 1991 registration figures, the American Kennel Club's annual ranking of breeds showed America's favorite retrievers pushing cocker spaniels into second place, out of the top spot they'd held for a decade.Poodles were the third-most-popular breed, unchanged since the previous year. The rest of the top 10 (with their earlier ranking in parentheses): 4) Rottweilers (5); 5) German shepherds (6); 6) golden retrievers (4); 7) beagles (9)
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NEWS
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,Sun Reporter | July 8, 2007
Call him writer's best friend. Since Homer's time (and we don't mean Simpson), dogs have served, quietly and dependably, as literary kibble. There were dogs (with fairly meaty roles) in both The Iliad and The Odyssey. Dogs were mentioned 32 times (mostly negatively) in The Bible. There were dogs in the works of Chaucer and Shakespeare, Dickens and Dostoevsky. And for the past 100 years or so - whether we were getting wild with Jack London's Buck, traveling with John Steinbeck's Charley, making house calls with James Herriot to creatures great and small or coming home with Eric Knight's Lassie - dog-themed books have stayed loyally at the reader's side.
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NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | August 20, 1996
A former city police officer was charged with cruelty to animals and destruction of property yesterday for allegedly shooting a Middle River neighbor's dog to death with a pellet gun as a group of children looked on in horror.The children -- many of them crying -- angrily chanted "dog killer" as Baltimore County police arrested Scottie D. McDonald Sr., 57, and drove him away in a patrol car.County police said he was released last night after posting $10,000 bond."The children are still crying," said Stewart L. Martinez of the 400 block of Waters Watch Court, owner of the mixed black Labrador retriever, named Santana after the rock-and-roll band.
NEWS
By J. Michael Kennedy and J. Michael Kennedy,Los Angeles Times | June 24, 2007
Funny where an idea will take you. Ten years ago, Luna the dog -- part pit bull and part Labrador retriever -- was gnawing on a piece of bamboo growing behind Craig Calfee's bicycle shop outside Santa Cruz, Calif. Last Sunday, Calfee was due to arrive in the West African nation of Ghana, intent on making bamboo bikes for the desperately poor. Chew toy to bicycle. Whimsy to good deed. Santa Cruz to Ghana. Not that this story is anywhere near finished. It's still anybody's guess whether something will come of this project.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2002
In a sad ending to the latest chapter in Howard County's long struggle with a rural woman over the care of her numerous pets, five dogs seized from Katherine Richards in March were put to death yesterday, while two were adopted and two more sent for rehabilitation by county animal control officials. Ten Labrador retriever puppies among the 19 animals seized in March have been adopted by other county residents. The action on the nine adult dogs occurred after Richards, 78, of Glenwood in the western part of the county, failed either to appeal a June 6 ruling in her case by the county Animal Matters Hearing Board, or to agree to the deal offered her, according to Cpl. Lisa Myers, police spokeswoman.
NEWS
By Donna Abel and Donna Abel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 26, 1999
VICKY CREAMER OF Belquest Kennels in Mount Airy is proud indeed these days.American, Bermudan, Puerto Rican and 1997 World Champion Tabatha's Rollick at Carowby (Aaron), Creamer's 5-year-old black Labrador retriever, earned a well-deserved Award of Merit from the class of 30 champion Labs from all over the world Feb. 9 at the 123rd annual Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show at Madison Square Garden in New York.As his registered name proclaims, Aaron is America's top winning Labrador retriever, accumulating the most points in American Kennel Club (AKC)
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Sun Staff Writer | December 1, 1994
Fed up with their commutes to work for a video and electronics rental firm in Washington, Sandy Johnston and a co-worker, Bonnie Broome, went looking for a better way to make a living. Now, they are working in their own kitchens -- baking dog biscuits.And whether those biscuits are dog-shaped, pig-shaped, bone-shaped, or braided into a wreath, says Ms. Johnston, who lives in Bayberry, the biscuits will have your pooch panting for more.She and Ms. Broome, of Largo, estimate they have sold 100 pounds of dog treats at craft fairs and flea markets since they set up shop in October.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1998
Roy, the first canine deputy of the Anne Arundel County sheriff's office, was euthanized yesterday because he had cancer.The 85-pound German shepherd was probably the best-loved sworn deputy and, with his lifelong partner, Deputy Fred Charles Jr. by his side, a fixture around the courthouse.The dog was so well liked that when a fire alarm emptied the Anne Arundel County Court House yesterday afternoon, the buzz outside was not about whether this was a false alarm or if everyone would be sent home early.
NEWS
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,Sun Reporter | July 8, 2007
Call him writer's best friend. Since Homer's time (and we don't mean Simpson), dogs have served, quietly and dependably, as literary kibble. There were dogs (with fairly meaty roles) in both The Iliad and The Odyssey. Dogs were mentioned 32 times (mostly negatively) in The Bible. There were dogs in the works of Chaucer and Shakespeare, Dickens and Dostoevsky. And for the past 100 years or so - whether we were getting wild with Jack London's Buck, traveling with John Steinbeck's Charley, making house calls with James Herriot to creatures great and small or coming home with Eric Knight's Lassie - dog-themed books have stayed loyally at the reader's side.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | November 16, 2003
WINTER'S HERE, and you feel lousy: You're coughing and sneezing; your muscles ache; your nose is an active mucus volcano. These symptoms - so familiar at this time of year - can mean only one thing: tiny fanged snails are eating your brain. No, seriously, brain snails are involved only about 35 percent of the time. More likely what you have is a cold or flu. (The word "flu" is short for "the flu.") Colds and flus have plagued humanity for millions of years, but in primitive times, nobody knew what caused them, because everybody was stupid.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | November 16, 2003
WINTER'S HERE, and you feel lousy: You're coughing and sneezing; your muscles ache; your nose is an active mucus volcano. These symptoms - so familiar at this time of year - can mean only one thing: tiny fanged snails are eating your brain. No, seriously, brain snails are involved only about 35 percent of the time. More likely what you have is a cold or flu. (The word "flu" is short for "the flu.") Colds and flus have plagued humanity for millions of years, but in primitive times, nobody knew what caused them, because everybody was stupid.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2002
In a sad ending to the latest chapter in Howard County's long struggle with a rural woman over the care of her numerous pets, five dogs seized from Katherine Richards in March were put to death yesterday, while two were adopted and two more sent for rehabilitation by county animal control officials. Ten Labrador retriever puppies among the 19 animals seized in March have been adopted by other county residents. The action on the nine adult dogs occurred after Richards, 78, of Glenwood in the western part of the county, failed either to appeal a June 6 ruling in her case by the county Animal Matters Hearing Board, or to agree to the deal offered her, according to Cpl. Lisa Myers, police spokeswoman.
NEWS
By Donna Abel and Donna Abel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 26, 1999
VICKY CREAMER OF Belquest Kennels in Mount Airy is proud indeed these days.American, Bermudan, Puerto Rican and 1997 World Champion Tabatha's Rollick at Carowby (Aaron), Creamer's 5-year-old black Labrador retriever, earned a well-deserved Award of Merit from the class of 30 champion Labs from all over the world Feb. 9 at the 123rd annual Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show at Madison Square Garden in New York.As his registered name proclaims, Aaron is America's top winning Labrador retriever, accumulating the most points in American Kennel Club (AKC)
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1998
Roy, the first canine deputy of the Anne Arundel County sheriff's office, was euthanized yesterday because he had cancer.The 85-pound German shepherd was probably the best-loved sworn deputy and, with his lifelong partner, Deputy Fred Charles Jr. by his side, a fixture around the courthouse.The dog was so well liked that when a fire alarm emptied the Anne Arundel County Court House yesterday afternoon, the buzz outside was not about whether this was a false alarm or if everyone would be sent home early.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1997
The men in brown are on strike. And the businesses at the Rotunda shopping center in North Baltimore who depend on UPS man Joe Beal's daily deliveries and pick-ups are bummed.The strike means scrambling for alternate shipping services and, to make matters worse, missing Joe's friendly face.Tall, broadly handsome with salt-and-pepper hair, wire-rimmed spectacles, and yes, nice legs, Joe conforms perfectly to the UPS image celebrated in song and film of the buff, sexy courier who drives a matching brown truck and hoists weighty packages with nimble ease.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | August 20, 1996
A former city police officer was charged with cruelty to animals and destruction of property yesterday for allegedly shooting a Middle River neighbor's dog to death with a pellet gun as a group of children looked on in horror.The children -- many of them crying -- angrily chanted "dog killer" as Baltimore County police arrested Scottie D. McDonald Sr., 57, and drove him away in a patrol car.County police said he was released last night after posting $10,000 bond."The children are still crying," said Stewart L. Martinez of the 400 block of Waters Watch Court, owner of the mixed black Labrador retriever, named Santana after the rock-and-roll band.
NEWS
By J. Michael Kennedy and J. Michael Kennedy,Los Angeles Times | June 24, 2007
Funny where an idea will take you. Ten years ago, Luna the dog -- part pit bull and part Labrador retriever -- was gnawing on a piece of bamboo growing behind Craig Calfee's bicycle shop outside Santa Cruz, Calif. Last Sunday, Calfee was due to arrive in the West African nation of Ghana, intent on making bamboo bikes for the desperately poor. Chew toy to bicycle. Whimsy to good deed. Santa Cruz to Ghana. Not that this story is anywhere near finished. It's still anybody's guess whether something will come of this project.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1997
The men in brown are on strike. And the businesses at the Rotunda shopping center in North Baltimore who depend on UPS man Joe Beal's daily deliveries and pick-ups are bummed.The strike means scrambling for alternate shipping services and, to make matters worse, missing Joe's friendly face.Tall, broadly handsome with salt-and-pepper hair, wire-rimmed spectacles, and yes, nice legs, Joe conforms perfectly to the UPS image celebrated in song and film of the buff, sexy courier who drives a matching brown truck and hoists weighty packages with nimble ease.
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Sun Staff Writer | December 1, 1994
Fed up with their commutes to work for a video and electronics rental firm in Washington, Sandy Johnston and a co-worker, Bonnie Broome, went looking for a better way to make a living. Now, they are working in their own kitchens -- baking dog biscuits.And whether those biscuits are dog-shaped, pig-shaped, bone-shaped, or braided into a wreath, says Ms. Johnston, who lives in Bayberry, the biscuits will have your pooch panting for more.She and Ms. Broome, of Largo, estimate they have sold 100 pounds of dog treats at craft fairs and flea markets since they set up shop in October.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 27, 1994
The forces that drive big American studio movies -- the need for an instantly recognizeable product that transcends age, class and sex barriers; and the potential for ancillary marketing tie-ins -- may have made "The Flintstones" inevitable. But they didn't have to make it so enjoyable.Sure, it's more of a corporate statement sponsored by the stockholders of MCA Inc. and McDonald's than an actual movie. Sure, it's got an IQ of 54, a plot that would have seemed skimpy in the original half-hour TV cartoon format, and enough bad puns on the word "stone" to throw a rock at. But it also yields certain delights unattainable anywhere else on the landscape: John Goodman as Fred Flintstone, giving as much to "Yabba-Dabba-Doo" as Olivier gave to "To be, or not to be: that is the question"; and Elizabeth Taylor, tied up and dumped on a bearskin rug.The best thing about the movie is the movie.
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