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BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | August 1, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Shares of USAir Group Inc. fell 15 percent yesterday after the airline said it ended talks with its labor unions on exchanging a stake in the company for wage concessions.The breakdown in talks is more bad news for an airline that has lost $3 billion in the last six years and suffers from the highest costs in the industry. The labor agreements were expected to save $2.45 million over five years, and failure to cut costs jeopardizes the airline's future, analysts said."They've been negotiating for well over a year and getting absolutely nowhere," said NatWest Securities analyst Vivian Lee. "They are trying to send a message of urgency.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Racial disparities in the restaurant labor force of BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport are hurting African-American employees and contributing to poverty in Baltimore, according to a study released Monday by the national labor organization Unite Here. Officials with AirMall USA, which subcontracts concessions operations at the airport for the Maryland Aviation Administration, rebutted the findings. The study, which Unite Here produced in collaboration with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, found African-American employees disproportionately work in low-wage positions at fast-food chains and in the back of airport restaurants as dishwashers and cooks, while white employees tend to fill higher-paying, front-of-house jobs as bartenders and servers.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 4, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Splitting 5-4, the Supreme Court gave federal workers and their labor unions a major victory yesterday, allowing them to bring up new issues for bargaining even while an existing contract is in effect.Among the federal employees who will directly benefit from the decision are thousands of Social Security Administration workers in the Baltimore area, including those at the agency's headquarters in Woodlawn.They and other federal employees had argued that they had a right to raise new issues midterm, but that claim had been rejected in a series of rulings by the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va.The Supreme Court, however, ruled that the Richmond court's view was wrong.
NEWS
July 6, 2014
The challenge and threat to the disabled, workers and public sector unions following the Supreme Court's decision in Harris v. Quinn ( "Public unions at risk," July 1) is real. Yet again the court has taken action abridging protections afforded working people who have done so much to sustain what remains of our ever shrinking middle class. For years, labor unions have been under increasing pressure, and it is no coincidence that the decline in union membership across the private and public sectors has coincided with the greatest income inequality we've seen since the Great Depression.
NEWS
April 29, 1996
INTENSE ECONOMIC PRESSURES are forcing the Port of Baltimore to re-think the way it does business. Revolutionary changes in the maritime industry bode ill for this port unless a new approach is found to stem the loss of cargo and shipping lines. Sacrifices from all port actors are essential if Baltimore wants to regain this lucrative trade.With consolidations, mergers and downsizing rippling through the maritime world, Baltimore's previous advantages have eroded. Deregulation robbed the port of its edge over arch-rival Norfolk.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,sun reporter | September 5, 2006
George West found something beyond the thrill rides, snowball stands and livestock yesterday at the Maryland State Fair. At a booth manned by volunteers from local labor unions, West, a member of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, also got some suggestions on whom to vote for in this fall's elections. He said many union members follow the union's advice come election season and often vote for Democrats. "Those who support you, you support," the Baltimore County man said.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1996
Two candidates for the 7th Congressional District seat have received key endorsements from powerful sectors of organized labor.The Rev. Frank M. Reid III was endorsed yesterday by a coalition of labor unions representing more than 30,000 blue-collar workers. State Sen. Delores E. Kelley received the backing of the National Education Association, acting on the recommendation of the Maryland State Teachers Association, which represents 46,000 educators in the state.Ms. Kelley's endorsement came with a $5,000 contribution from the NEA, the largest amount allowed by an organization under federal campaign law.Her campaign also announced yesterday a $5,000 contribution from EMILY'S List, a national political action committee that supports Democratic women running for Congress who favor abortion rights.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 29, 2003
Hoping to increase its political leverage, the AFL-CIO announced yesterday that it was creating a novel organization for nonunion workers who agree with the labor movement on many issues and want to campaign alongside labor on those issues. Federation officials said they hoped the new organization, to be called Working America, would attract more than 1 million members to lobby Congress and to join demonstrations on issues from raising the minimum wage to stopping the privatization of Social Security.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | February 17, 1996
Del. Elijah E. Cummings, a West Baltimore legislator who is among the front-runners for Rep. Kweisi Mfume's 7th District congressional seat, picked up two more key endorsements yesterday, with a little more than two weeks to go until the March 5 primary election.The Baltimore Building and Construction Trades Council, an umbrella organization representing 17 labor unions, threw its support behind Mr. Cummings, the Maryland House speaker pro-tem.Maryland Senate Majority Leader Clarence W. Blount, a West Baltimore Democrat who is dean of the city's legislative delegation, also formally endorsed Mr. Cummings yesterday, pledging the support of his political organization, the Five in Five Democratic Club.
BUSINESS
By a Sun Staff Writer | April 15, 1995
Responding to a bleak auditors' assessment, USAir Group Inc. has said it expects to finish 1995 with more than $400 million in cash and that it "has not hired bankruptcy counsel, nor does it intend to do so."In the company's year-end filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Thursday, auditors for the Arlington, Va.-based airline expressed "substantial doubt" that the financially struggling airline could continue operating in its current form.But the airline, in a separate filing made later that day, insisted it had enough funds for normal operations through 1995, "barring unanticipated events," and has not hired a bankruptcy attorney.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
The University of Maryland Medical System has set aside tens of millions of dollars because of complex financial transactions related to interest rates that have not paid off — yet. The medical system cannot use those funds — $93 million at the end of March — even as it wrestles with financial pressures that have led to layoffs. Several years ago, UMMS entered into what are known as interest rate swaps when the financing tool was popular and widely used by hospitals, municipalities and businesses looking to protect themselves against the risk of rising interest rates.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2013
Six weeks after taking over the U.S. Department of Labor, Marylander Thomas E. Perez is receiving praise from unions, concern from business leaders and hope from others that he will expand the agency's mission. Perez, a former Maryland labor secretary, has stepped into the Cabinet post as the agency considers new regulations that could affect pay and working conditions for millions of Americans, from stonecutters to home health care workers. And labor analysts say the 51-year-old Takoma Park man may also be more able than past secretaries to move the agency beyond its traditional role as an enforcer of labor laws, giving it more influence over economic policy and the nation's stubbornly high unemployment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel | June 27, 2013
We're a bit biased, but the staff at EW are clearly geniuses.  In the magazine's latest issue, out Friday, the writers and editors have named Baltimore-set social tapestry "The Wire" as the No. 1 TV show. Of all time. Here's what they had to say: "The most sustained narrative in television history, The Wire used the drug trade in Baltimore, heavily researched by creator David Simon, to tell tales of race and class with unprecedented complexity. Politics, the war on drugs, labor unions, public education, the media - these were among the big themes, all examined through exquisitely drawn characters, such as the brilliant yet broken detective Jimmy McNulty (Dominic West)
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2013
Labor unions representing federal employees reacted angrily to the $3.8 trillion budget unveiled Wednesday by President Barack Obama, who proposed trimming $20 billion from federal retirement benefits - reopening a debate many Democrats felt had been resolved last year. The 2014 spending plan - which arrived months late - would reduce annual budget deficits by an additional $1 trillion over a decade, according to the administration's estimates; raise the federal minimum wage to $9; curb Social Security spending; increase the federal cigarette tax and close tax loopholes the Obama administration has pursued for years without success.
NEWS
February 9, 2013
I take issue with much of Lane Windham's recent commentary ("If not labor unions, then what?" Jan. 29) beginning with the fundamental premise that it was the unions that provided us with economic redistribution. Like many other academicians, Ms. Windham confuses correlation with causation throughout her thought process. The simple presence of unions in the United States during our rise as the undisputed economic world leader does not establish them as the cause of a better or fairer distribution of wealth.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | February 6, 2013
As President Barack Obama said in his inaugural address, America "cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well and a growing many barely make it. " Not even the very wealthy can continue to succeed without a broader-based prosperity. That's because 70 percent of economic activity in America is consumer spending. When most Americans are becoming poorer, they're less able to spend. Without their spending, the economy can't get out of first gear. That's a big reason why the recovery continues to be anemic.
NEWS
December 24, 2012
The United Steelworkers Local 9477 has dreamed up a number of fictitious reasons for the demise of the mill at Sparrows Point ("Union's account of steel mill's end," Dec. 18). They have refused to admit, and The Sun seems afraid to say, that the real reason there will no longer be a steel mill at Sparrows Point stems from the fact that no corporation in the U.S. can make money in that business because of high labor costs due to union demands. Why are our shoes no longer made in the United States?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel | June 27, 2013
We're a bit biased, but the staff at EW are clearly geniuses.  In the magazine's latest issue, out Friday, the writers and editors have named Baltimore-set social tapestry "The Wire" as the No. 1 TV show. Of all time. Here's what they had to say: "The most sustained narrative in television history, The Wire used the drug trade in Baltimore, heavily researched by creator David Simon, to tell tales of race and class with unprecedented complexity. Politics, the war on drugs, labor unions, public education, the media - these were among the big themes, all examined through exquisitely drawn characters, such as the brilliant yet broken detective Jimmy McNulty (Dominic West)
NEWS
December 24, 2012
The United Steelworkers Local 9477 has dreamed up a number of fictitious reasons for the demise of the mill at Sparrows Point ("Union's account of steel mill's end," Dec. 18). They have refused to admit, and The Sun seems afraid to say, that the real reason there will no longer be a steel mill at Sparrows Point stems from the fact that no corporation in the U.S. can make money in that business because of high labor costs due to union demands. Why are our shoes no longer made in the United States?
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2012
Unite Here — a labor union trying to organize workers at the Hyatt Regency Baltimore — gathered outside the hotel Tuesday to publicize a federal agency's decision to take the company to trial over alleged unfair labor practices. The National Labor Relations Board issued its complaint this month, alleging that Hyatt Regency managers "interrogated employees about their union activities," began "invoking harsh discipline" when employees arrived late to work and fired four people this year as part of that campaign.
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