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NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1999
SILVER SPRING -- Just 100 yards outside the Capital Beltway, they train Joe College to be Joe Hill.Students at the National Labor College learn about union organizing, from the work of Hill, whose 1915 execution inspired a legendary song, to the 55-year career of George Meany.The college is the only school in the United States to offer bachelor's degrees exclusively in labor studies. Its first class, numbering 100, will graduate in July."To be a responsible labor leader, the seat of your pants isn't enough anymore," says college President Susan Schurman, a hard-charging former bus driver and union organizer with a doctorate in education.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2010
The past decade not only saw monumental upheaval in the economy but also a reordering of Maryland's work force. Employers in health care and government steadily added jobs, even through two recessions. But manufacturing, once the cornerstone of the state's economy, shrank by more than a third between the end of 2000 and 2010. Employment in construction, financial services and retail retreated to 1990s levels. The divergence has been striking. While growth sectors added 200,000 jobs in Maryland over the past 10 years, declining industries shed just over 140,000 jobs, according to a Baltimore Sun analysis of estimates from the U.S. Department of Labor.
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BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | July 23, 1993
Coordinator named for Labor StudiesDundalk Community College has appointed a new coordinator for its Labor Studies Program -- the only community college labor program in Maryland.Lynne Mingarelli says she wants to attract more students by offering more noncredit classes, by doing more to serve office workers and by addressing technological changes to workplaces."I feel we are at a turning point" in the history of the American worker, she said in an interview early this week.When the nation began, agriculture was the biggest employer.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | September 6, 2009
Alfred Joseph Moran, a retired telephone union official who was active in labor organizations for four decades and was a World War II veteran, died Aug. 28 at Stella Maris Hospice of surgical complications related to an aneurysm. The former Woodlawn resident was 86. Born in Baltimore and raised in Bolton Hill, he was a Corpus Christi Parochial School graduate. As a young man, he rode a bicycle to deliver blueprints in downtown Baltimore and sold office equipment for the Victor Adding Machine Co. In 1940, he enlisted in the 110th Field Artillery, a division of the Maryland National Guard.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | September 6, 2009
Alfred Joseph Moran, a retired telephone union official who was active in labor organizations for four decades and was a World War II veteran, died Aug. 28 at Stella Maris Hospice of surgical complications related to an aneurysm. The former Woodlawn resident was 86. Born in Baltimore and raised in Bolton Hill, he was a Corpus Christi Parochial School graduate. As a young man, he rode a bicycle to deliver blueprints in downtown Baltimore and sold office equipment for the Victor Adding Machine Co. In 1940, he enlisted in the 110th Field Artillery, a division of the Maryland National Guard.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2010
The past decade not only saw monumental upheaval in the economy but also a reordering of Maryland's work force. Employers in health care and government steadily added jobs, even through two recessions. But manufacturing, once the cornerstone of the state's economy, shrank by more than a third between the end of 2000 and 2010. Employment in construction, financial services and retail retreated to 1990s levels. The divergence has been striking. While growth sectors added 200,000 jobs in Maryland over the past 10 years, declining industries shed just over 140,000 jobs, according to a Baltimore Sun analysis of estimates from the U.S. Department of Labor.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | June 27, 2007
SILVER SPRING -- For JoAnn Johntony and Davida Russell, a college education always appeared out of reach. Finding the time and money for education, while balancing work and family, seemed impossible for the school custodian and bus driver for developmentally disabled children, respectively, from Ohio. But here they were at the National Labor College last weekend, beaming with pride and posing for pictures in their caps and gowns. With financial support from their union and the college's focus on working adults, each woman now has a bachelor's degree in labor studies.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff writer | January 14, 1992
The county's unionized blue-collar workers are looking for a little respect. And they're taking to the airwaves to get it.Within the next two to three weeks, the American Federation of State, County andMunicipal Employees, Local 582, will begin airing a series of 30-second spots with the county's three cable television companies, all designed to enhance the image of the men and women who pave the roads and lay the sewer pipes in Anne Arundel."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judith Green | July 23, 1998
As a choreographer, Doug Hamby rushes in where angels fear to tread.In his program at the Dance Place this weekend, Hamby and his University of Maryland, Baltimore County-based company will journey from the lyrical romance of "Quintet" (whose composer, Scott Pinder, suppports his musical gift by running the TelePrompTer on ABC-TV's "Nightline") to the exuberant and celebratory "Opus 98," with a percussion accompaniment, "Genderang Senga" by Ben Pasaribu, for brake drums, tom-toms and woodblocks, played live by Tom Goldstein of the UMBC faculty.
BUSINESS
December 17, 2002
New positions Stetson, Cassell join Communications Electronics Communications Electronics appointed F.J. Stetson as director of new business development and Michael T. Cassell as emerging market sales director for the Timonium-based wireless dealer. Stetson, a graduate of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, is responsible for identifying and developing new business opportunities. Formerly the director of sales for Resource Tower, he lives in Towson. Cassell is responsible for sales of new products.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1999
SILVER SPRING -- Just 100 yards outside the Capital Beltway, they train Joe College to be Joe Hill.Students at the National Labor College learn about union organizing, from the work of Hill, whose 1915 execution inspired a legendary song, to the 55-year career of George Meany.The college is the only school in the United States to offer bachelor's degrees exclusively in labor studies. Its first class, numbering 100, will graduate in July."To be a responsible labor leader, the seat of your pants isn't enough anymore," says college President Susan Schurman, a hard-charging former bus driver and union organizer with a doctorate in education.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | July 23, 1993
Coordinator named for Labor StudiesDundalk Community College has appointed a new coordinator for its Labor Studies Program -- the only community college labor program in Maryland.Lynne Mingarelli says she wants to attract more students by offering more noncredit classes, by doing more to serve office workers and by addressing technological changes to workplaces."I feel we are at a turning point" in the history of the American worker, she said in an interview early this week.When the nation began, agriculture was the biggest employer.
NEWS
September 16, 1990
WESTMINSTER - James P. Bruns has joined the staff of Carroll Community College as the new director of instruction.He comes to CCC from the social science division of Dundalk Community College, where, as chairman, he was responsible for implementing all credit and non-credit courses for the department, as well as developing career programs in labor studies, early childhood education, special education and chemical dependency counseling.He also developed a contract with the State Human Resources Division to train public assistance workers and instituted Dundalk's first coordinated effort in working with business and industry.
NEWS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2003
About a hundred angry Bethlehem Steel Corp. retirees piled into the dingy conference room of a Baltimore hotel in the Travel Plaza off Interstate 95 yesterday morning and demanded answers: Why wasn't the company funding their pension plans? Shouldn't someone have been policing the company? How could this have happened? The questions came from some of the 1,300 Baltimore-area Bethlehem Steel retirees who will see significantly smaller pension checks next month and will have to start paying money back to a federal agency that has been overseeing their fund since April.
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