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NEWS
By David Horsey | November 27, 2012
The Great American Twinkie Crisis illuminates what is wrong with the relationship between management and labor in this country. Hostess, the company that, since the 1930s, has provided our nation with snacks that are nearly indestructible, now threatens to go out of business and leave us bereft of Ding Dongs, Sno Balls, Ho Hos, CupCakes, Wonder Bread and a variety of other baked goods that are probably not good for us but, at least to a kid's palate,...
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
Edwin L. Kess, a retired labor relations director who was active in his church, died May 22 of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Columbia. He was 86. "Edwin was strong-willed and wanted to succeed. He wanted to succeed in whatever he tried to do," said a brother, the Rev. Leon Kess Jr., retired pastor of Queen's Chapel United Methodist Church in Beltsville. The son of a U.S. Custom House worker and a cafeteria employee, Edwin Leroy Kess was born and raised in Fairfield. After graduating from Frederick Douglass High School in 1944, Mr. Kess enlisted in the Army and at the end of World War II, returned to Baltimore.
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BUSINESS
July 28, 1995
The Baltimore Sun Co. has promoted Howard G. Weinstein to a newly created position, vice president/labor relations, Mary Junck, publisher and chief executive officer, has announced.Mr. Weinstein, who joined the company as director of labor relations in 1991 after working as a labor lawyer at the firm of Venable, Baetjer & Howard, will manage the labor relations department and will oversee environmental, safety and medical concerns for the paper.He will report directly to the publisher and will become a member of the executive committee.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2013
The Hyatt Regency Baltimore has settled a federal complaint alleging unfair labor practices, the hotel and a local union said Thursday. The agreement, signed Wednesday, came nine days after a National Labor Relations Board administrative law judge began hearing the case. The vast majority of cases before the board ultimately settle. The federal agency's general counsel alleged that Hyatt Regency managers "interrogated employees about their union activities," began "invoking harsh discipline" when employees arrived late to work and fired four workers last year in reaction to their efforts to unionize with labor union Unite Here.
BUSINESS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | June 22, 1992
Joyce D. Miller, vice president of the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union, based in New York, has a busy schedule.Also president of the Coalition of Labor Union Women, Ms. Miller has been a union organizer for 30 years.But she found time recently to attend a talk by an attorney with the National Labor Relations Board about the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to limit leafleting by unions on company premises.The talk was at her local chapter of the Industrial Relations Research Association, a national membership organization founded in 1947 to address labor-management issues in a non-confrontational setting.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
Edwin L. Kess, a retired labor relations director who was active in his church, died May 22 of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Columbia. He was 86. "Edwin was strong-willed and wanted to succeed. He wanted to succeed in whatever he tried to do," said a brother, the Rev. Leon Kess Jr., retired pastor of Queen's Chapel United Methodist Church in Beltsville. The son of a U.S. Custom House worker and a cafeteria employee, Edwin Leroy Kess was born and raised in Fairfield. After graduating from Frederick Douglass High School in 1944, Mr. Kess enlisted in the Army and at the end of World War II, returned to Baltimore.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2001
Denise F. Gregory, Baltimore's new labor commissioner, arrived on the job this week at a time of edgy relations between the city and its 16,000 workers. In the face of a budget shortfall, Mayor Martin O'Malley is hoping to hold down some salary raises. He's cracking down on absenteeism among workers. He's looking to gain concessions from city labor unions in negotiations. He is mentioning possible layoffs with growing regularity. As O'Malley's chief liaison with city unions, "She's walking into a minefield," said Stephan G. Fugate, president of the Baltimore Fire Officers Union.
NEWS
December 17, 2002
Warren Malcolm Davison, a retired labor relations attorney, died of a heart attack Saturday at his Pikesville home. He was 69, and had retired in April as a partner and manager of the Baltimore office of Littler Mendelson at the World Trade Center. Born in Boston, Mr. Davison earned his undergraduate and law degrees from Harvard University. For many years, he interviewed prospective Harvard students as part of their application process. After a brief stint in the Army, he became an attorney with the National Labor Relations Board in Washington.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | January 22, 2004
Charles Thomas "Red" Muntain, a one-time ironworker who became a labor relations official and aide to the secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, died Jan. 15 in Centreville. He was 82. Family members said Mr. Muntain suffered from dementia and drowned after falling off a Corsica River pier adjacent to his home. He had moved to Centreville from Crofton in 1987. Born in Baltimore and raised in Highlandtown, he attended Calvert Hall College High School and served in the Navy aboard the USS Overton in the North Atlantic during World War II. After the war, he worked on construction projects as a member of the AFL-CIO International Association of Bridge, Structural and Ornamental Iron Workers Local 16 in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | February 3, 1994
W. Hall Harris III, retired supervisor of labor relations at the Western Electric Co. and a volunteer in a program that studied migratory swans, died Sunday of heart failure at the Keswick Home in Roland Park. He was 87.He retired in 1970 after a 41-year career in labor relations at the Point Breeze plant of the wire, cord and telephone apparatus manufacturer. He was an original employee of the plant when it opened in 1929.He was a 1925 graduate of the Gilman School and received his bachelor's degree at Yale University in 1929.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2013
A hearing into allegations of unfair labor practices filed against the Hyatt Regency Baltimore began late Monday after hours of ultimately fruitless discussion about settling the complaint. National Labor Relations Board attorneys began their case against the hotel by describing the situation as a "predictable pattern" of "unlawful" management responses to unionizing efforts by employees working with Unite Here, a union that represents employees in fields such as hospitality. "It's a classic nip-in-the-bud case," said Sean R. Marshall, a senior trial attorney for the board.
NEWS
By David Horsey | November 27, 2012
The Great American Twinkie Crisis illuminates what is wrong with the relationship between management and labor in this country. Hostess, the company that, since the 1930s, has provided our nation with snacks that are nearly indestructible, now threatens to go out of business and leave us bereft of Ding Dongs, Sno Balls, Ho Hos, CupCakes, Wonder Bread and a variety of other baked goods that are probably not good for us but, at least to a kid's palate,...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 2, 2005
The rulings of the National Labor Relations Board have poured out one after another in recent months, with many decisions tilting in favor of employers. The Republican-dominated board has made it more difficult for temporary workers to unionize and for unions to obtain financial information from companies during contract talks. It has ruled that graduate students working as teaching assistants do not have the right to unionize at private universities, and it has given companies greater flexibility to use a powerful anti-union weapon - locking out workers - in labor disputes.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | January 22, 2004
Charles Thomas "Red" Muntain, a one-time ironworker who became a labor relations official and aide to the secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, died Jan. 15 in Centreville. He was 82. Family members said Mr. Muntain suffered from dementia and drowned after falling off a Corsica River pier adjacent to his home. He had moved to Centreville from Crofton in 1987. Born in Baltimore and raised in Highlandtown, he attended Calvert Hall College High School and served in the Navy aboard the USS Overton in the North Atlantic during World War II. After the war, he worked on construction projects as a member of the AFL-CIO International Association of Bridge, Structural and Ornamental Iron Workers Local 16 in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2003
Douglas V. Dorman, who headed labor relations for Martin Marietta Corp., died Tuesday of pneumonia at Edenwald retirement community, where he had lived for nearly 13 years. The former Lutherville resident was 89. Born in Tarrytown, N.Y., he attended public schools in New York and New Jersey, and began work as a clerk at the New York Life Insurance Co. Family members said he had ambitions of becoming an aircraft pilot and applied to the Army Air Corps but was rejected because he was 6 feet 5 inches tall, too tall for the cockpits of World War II-era military planes.
NEWS
September 17, 2003
William Arthur Bailey Jr., retired chief of labor relations for the old Western Electric Corp., died Monday at Magnolia Hall Nursing Center in Chestertown of complications after surgery. He was 89 and had moved to the Eastern Shore 15 years ago from Bel Air. Born in Baltimore and raised in the 2700 block of Guilford Ave., he was a 1932 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. He earned a degree in business administration from Lehigh University. During World War II, he joined the Army Air Forces and was stationed in the Pacific.
NEWS
By Mary Ellen Gambon and Mary Ellen Gambon,States News Service | March 3, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The chairwoman of the Federal Labor Relations Authority recently told a congressional subcommittee that the agency has reduced the number of pending cases to its lowest number in years despite a growing caseload and a dwindling budget.Jean McKee, the chairwoman, said the FLRA has steadily improved its handling of cases, closing 522 during the 1992 fiscal year, a jump of 11 percent over the previous year.At the end of January 1993, the number of cases pending was 179, the lowest in the history of the agency, she said.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2003
Douglas V. Dorman, who headed labor relations for Martin Marietta Corp., died Tuesday of pneumonia at Edenwald retirement community, where he had lived for nearly 13 years. The former Lutherville resident was 89. Born in Tarrytown, N.Y., he attended public schools in New York and New Jersey, and began work as a clerk at the New York Life Insurance Co. Family members said he had ambitions of becoming an aircraft pilot and applied to the Army Air Corps but was rejected because he was 6 feet 5 inches tall, too tall for the cockpits of World War II-era military planes.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 13, 2003
What was at stake in the just-settled Broadway musicians' strike wasn't simply preserving jobs, it was preserving the sound of Broadway musicals. There's a reason, after all, that these shows are called "music-als," and the danger of diluting the way they sound is real. In Florida earlier this year, I attended a production of the 1998 Alfred Uhry-Jason Robert Brown musical Parade, which was performed to prerecorded accompaniment. The oddity of the experience began as soon as I entered the theater and wondered where the orchestra was. At first, I thought it might have been out of sight - not an unreasonable assumption since nowadays it's not unusual for the orchestra to be under the stage, over the stage or stuffed onto the sides of the stage.
NEWS
December 17, 2002
Warren Malcolm Davison, a retired labor relations attorney, died of a heart attack Saturday at his Pikesville home. He was 69, and had retired in April as a partner and manager of the Baltimore office of Littler Mendelson at the World Trade Center. Born in Boston, Mr. Davison earned his undergraduate and law degrees from Harvard University. For many years, he interviewed prospective Harvard students as part of their application process. After a brief stint in the Army, he became an attorney with the National Labor Relations Board in Washington.
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