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By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | January 11, 1991
LONDON -- Britain's bipartisan consensus on Persian Gulf policy frayed yesterday as the Conservative government prepared for war and the opposition Labor Party called for more time for sanctions to work.The difference will be highlighted in a House of Commons emergency debate on the gulf next week as the United Nations' Jan. 15 deadline for Iraqi withdrawal from Kuwait arrives.Labor's leader, Neil Kinnock, who chaired a meeting of his party leadership yesterday, said that sanctions were hurting Iraq not only economically, but also militarily.
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NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | April 26, 2012
Are the French getting their Tea Party on? That's what an outsider looking at the country's first-round presidential voting results might have been led to believe. But, as with many things French, the reality is très compliquée . The weekend vote knocked out all but the two candidates long expected to square off in the May 6 final: Socialist Francois Hollande (28.6 percent) and incumbent center-right President Nicolas Sarkozy (27.2 percent). This isn't the story, though. The most striking news is the 17.9 percent score by Marine Le Pen's National Front party.
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NEWS
October 23, 1993
Question: What is the British Labor Party without labor? Answer: Ready for a comeback.British trade unions created the Labor Party. It grew from a left-wing opposition to a ruling party. A quarter-century ago, analysts said it would be dominant into the future because Labor-voting families were having more children than Conservative-voting families.Since that analysis, the Labor Party has lurched to oblivion. Conservatives have governed Britain for 19 of the last 23 years. The demographic analysis ignored the success of the Conservatives at winning adherents and the alienation of Labor voters by the knee-jerk leftism of its politicians.
NEWS
July 28, 2011
Norwegian terrorism suspect Anders Behring Breivik may have attained what he hoped for - worldwide notoriety. The young man has shaken Norway to its roots and out of its complacency. Apparently, for a whole decade, he functioned as a one-man sleeper cell, meeting his mother once a week for dinner, blogging incessantly, playing violent computer games and writing a manifesto about what he perceived as Europe's cultural annihilation by the liberal political class that has been bringing a lot of Muslims to the continent as immigrants.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | April 14, 1992
LONDON -- Neil Kinnock, the man who brought the Labor Party out of the wilderness -- but just not far enough -- resigned the party leadership yesterday.After Thursday's defeat at the hands of the Conservatives, it was expected.In a statement to his colleagues, the red-haired Welshman who rebuilt the Labor Party from a ruin of union and leftist domination, then for eight years harried and challenged Margaret Thatcher and her successor, John Major, said, "I will not be seeking re-election as leader of the Labor Party."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 15, 1993
JERUSALEM -- Israel's governing Labor Party nominated as its candidate for president yesterday Ezer Weizman, a former air force commander and defense minister who became a "super dove" while helping to make peace with Egypt.Mr. Weizman, 68, won 52 percent of the votes from 1,186 members of the Labor Party's central committee, easily defeating another liberal, Arie "Lova" Eliav, and a center-right candidate, Shlomo Hillel.Dismissed from the "national unity government" of Yitzhak Shamir, then prime minister, three years ago for talking with leaders of the Palestine Liberation Organization, Mr. Weizman symbolizes to many Israelis their quest for peace with the country's Arab neighbors, including the Palestinians.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | July 19, 1992
LONDON -- Britain's Labor Party has chosen John Smith, the steady Highland Scot from the village of Ardrishaig on the misty edge of Loch Fyne, to be its new leader.Over 90 percent of the party's electors, assembled yesterday in London's Royal Horticultural Hall, voted for the stocky, owlish man with the perpetually quizzical look. Bryan Gould, his closest competitor, got 9 percent.Mr. Smith succeeds Neal Kinnock, the fiery but burned-out Welshman who in April led the party to its fourth consecutive defeat at the hands of the Conservatives in 13 years.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Sun Staff Correspondent | April 17, 1991
LONDON -- Britain's opposition Labor Party staked its claim to power yesterday with a manifesto of new-style socialism aimed at ending 12 years of Conservative rule.Publication of the 20,000-word document is the result of the party's four-year effort to modernize its policies and prepare itself to contest the political center ground.Conservative Prime Minister John Major must call a general election in the next 15 months. Labor, now widely recognized as offering voters a viable alternative government, is urging him to set a June ballot.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 3, 1990
BLACKPOOL, England -- Labor Party leader Neil Kinnock presented himself to British voters yesterday as prime-minister-in-waiting, eager for power at home and influence abroad."
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,London Bureau of The Sun | April 28, 1995
LONDON -- Goodbye socialism. Hello capitalism.The political party that brought Britain government-run mines, government-run medical care and government-run trains is now embracing the free market.The Labor Party, out of political power since 1979, is to give up its pledge to nationalize major industries, the pledge almost every member knew as "Clause 4."When the party convenes tomorrow, Clause 4 will be replaced by a jargon-filled statement that is about as controversial as a Chamber of Commerce manifesto.
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 12, 2008
LONDON - British Prime Minister Gordon Brown survived a crucial battle of nerves with Parliament yesterday over expanding Britain's anti-terrorism laws, securing initial approval to hold terrorism suspects for up to 42 days before they are charged or freed. The legislation squeaked through the House of Commons by nine votes amid concerns that it could threaten innocent citizens with the loss of their homes, jobs and social networks even if they are released after spending six weeks behind bars.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 3, 2008
LONDON -- Boris Johnson, the floppy-haired media celebrity and Conservative member of Parliament who transformed himself from a shambling, amusing-aphorism-uttering figure of fun into a plausible political force, was elected mayor of London yesterday. Johnson's surprising victory was not only a triumph of his own singular style, but also a resounding public rebuke to the Labor government of Prime Minister Gordon Brown in a day full of such rebukes. As votes were tallied across the country after Thursday's elections, it emerged that the Labor Party had suffered its worst local election results in at least 40 years.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 13, 2007
JERUSALEM -- Ehud Barak, the former Israeli prime minister ousted by voters six years ago, recaptured leadership of the Labor Party yesterday. Barak's victory, by a margin of 53 percent to 47 percent over lawmaker Ami Ayalon in a party runoff, represents a remarkable political rebirth for the ambitious and strong-willed leader who lost in 2001 to the hawkish Ariel Sharon. "Today begins the journey toward restoration," Barak told supporters early today during a brief victory speech at party headquarters in Tel Aviv.
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 11, 2007
London -- Prime Minister Tony Blair, who upended the old politics of liberalism and conservatism in Britain and pushed for an "ethical" foreign policy, said yesterday that he will step down June 27 after more than a decade in power. Blair, 54, one of Britain's longest-serving prime ministers, resurrected the Labor Party from the electoral backwaters in 1997 on a wave of national optimism, only to see it founder over an unpopular war in Iraq. His successor almost certainly will be Gordon Brown, the introverted, intellectual chancellor of the exchequer who worked side by side with him to create the doctrine of New Labor but fell out with Blair in recent years over when he would be allowed to have his own day in the sun as prime minister.
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 7, 2006
LONDON -- Prime Minister Tony Blair's hold on office was dealt a strong blow yesterday when eight former loyalists quit the government in a bid to speed his departure. The political crisis engulfing one of the Bush administration's staunchest allies follows months of unease within the Labor Party as support has dwindled over issues such as immigration, health care and the cost of wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Less than 15 months since his party sailed to a historic third consecutive general election victory, Blair is seen by many of his allies as a liability, and opposition leader David Cameron has said that Labor is "in meltdown."
NEWS
By STEVEN PHILIP KRAMER and STEVEN PHILIP KRAMER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 14, 2006
George W. Bush is not alone. Tony Blair, who basked in extraordinarily high public approval ratings when he became prime minister of Britain nine years ago, is now the most unpopular Labor Party prime minister in modern times, a Daily Telegraph survey showed last week. While Bush struggles with an approval rating in the low 30s, only 26 percent of British voters are satisfied with Blair's performance, lower than Prime Minister Harold Wilson's 27 percent rating in May 1968 after devaluation of the pound.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 4, 1990
BLACKPOOL, England -- The opposition Labor Party backed Britain's military involvement in the Persian Gulf crisis yesterday but urged time for sanctions to work.The party's leadership fought off a left-wing attempt at its annual conference to subject any use of British armed force against Iraq to the "explicit authorization" of the United Nations.Labor favors international approval of the use of force, either through the U.N. Security Council or the U.N. military staff committee, but it does not want a formal U.N. resolution to be a precondition.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | April 5, 1992
LONDON -- Britain is moving into the final stage of one of the tightest electoral campaigns in its modern history, with the Labor Party holding a slight lead in the polls over the incumbent Conservatives.Three of four polls published in today's major newspapers gave Labor a two-point lead over the Conservatives. Only one, a poll in the Sunday Telegraph, showed the parties even.The apprehension now is that Thursday's election will produce a hung Parliament, with none of the parties having the necessary 326-seat majority in the House of Commons to govern on its own.Thus, Paddy Ashdown, leader of the smallest of the three major parties, the Liberal Democrats, has assumed an uncommon and unexpected importance.
NEWS
By VANORA MCWALTERS and VANORA MCWALTERS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 6, 2006
LONDON -- Reeling from his party's poor showing in local elections, British Prime Minister Tony Blair fired several senior ministers from his Cabinet yesterday in a sweeping reshuffle intended to reassert his authority and silence party members who want him to quit. But his most powerful colleague, rival and heir-apparent - Gordon Brown, the chancellor of the exchequer - distanced himself from the reshuffle, saying he had not been consulted. Brown also described the voting results as "a warning shot" that showed the Labor Party needed to be "renewed."
NEWS
By JOEL GREENBERG and JOEL GREENBERG,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 28, 2006
JERUSALEM -- The centrist Kadima Party of acting Prime Minister Ehud Olmert signed a coalition deal yesterday with the left-leaning Labor Party, forming the core of a new Israeli government expected to pursue a plan for the removal of Israeli settlements from large areas of the West Bank. Kadima won Israel's election March 28 but must build a coalition with other parties to gain a majority in the 120-member legislature. A coalition agreement was signed Wednesday with the Pensioners Party, and two religious parties, Shas and United Torah Judaism, are expected to join.
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