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NEWS
September 7, 1998
HERE'S something on which labor and industry can agree: America needs to bolster its work-force skills.This year, Congress passed a bipartisan bill to help states improve job training. The Workforce Investment Act, pushed by President Clinton and earlier by former Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich, should help both sides in the years to come.Businesses certainly benefit from training programs; they need employees who are equipped to handle increasingly technical tasks that require more than a 12th-grade education.
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NEWS
By Peter Morici | August 8, 2005
ANDREW STERN has taken the Service Employees International Union out of the AFL-CIO, along with the Teamsters and United Food and Commercial Workers. Given federation President John Sweeney's failure to deliver on his 1995 promise to reinvigorate the labor movement and declining union membership, few can blame the rebels. But all the debate about organizing tactics and political strategy misses what really ails the labor movement. In the 1950s, unions made sense. Most American workers were employed as agricultural laborers, in routine factory jobs and in similar repetitive tasks.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | February 28, 1994
AT THEIR annual winter board meeting last week, America's unions emphatically mended fences with President Clinton and the Democratic Party. Concretely, they voted to put an unprecedented $10 million into Mr. Clinton's campaign for universal health insurance and to mobilize rank-and-file support. And they will resume their customary contributions to Democratic fund-raising operations.With a handful of exceptions, labor will also work to elect and re-elect Democrats to the House and Senate.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | November 12, 1993
IT'S time for a different NAFTA. To avert disaster, the president should withdraw the proposed agreement before Wednesday's vote, go back to the negotiating table with the Mexicans and do what it takes to enlist sufficient support from his own party.With the White House still at least 25 votes short, Mr. Clinton's current up-or-down strategy on NAFTA portends a donnybrook for both the president and NAFTA's congressional opponents. If NAFTA is defeated, Mr. Clinton and his party will suffer a self-inflicted wound -- and that doesn't have to happen.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | October 4, 2006
The National Labor Relations Board issued a decision yesterday that experts say expands the definition of who can be considered a supervisor. The ruling in Washington could have far-reaching implications for trade unions and at workplaces around the country. The federal panel ruled 3-2 that permanent charge nurses at hospitals should be categorized as supervisors, meaning they would not be covered by the National Labor Relations Act and would be barred from joining a union. The long-awaited NLRB decision involved nurses at Oakwood Health Care in Michigan.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 26, 1996
Displaying some of the labor movement's newfound aggressiveness, the United Steelworkers of America hopes to turn today's Indianapolis 500 into something more than a car race.Through demonstrations, banners, a blimp and a new country music song, the 700,000-member union is seeking to transform the speedway into a soapbox from which to urge consumers to boycott Bridgestone/Firestone Inc., the tire company.This is all part of a multipronged campaign, including rallies at tire dealers, to increase pressure on Bridgestone, a Japanese-owned company that the steelworkers have been fighting since they began a failed 10-month strike against it in July 1994.
NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND and JULES WITCOVER | September 26, 1997
PITTSBURGH -- The scene at the Convention Center seemed more like an old-fashioned religious revival meeting than an AFL-CIO convention as it opened under the command of president John Sweeney, who took over from labor's old guard two years ago in an insurgent movement.New union members from around the country marched up to the podium and gave personal testimony about their successful labor organizing fights in a host of professions and industries, many of them long-resistant to any union presence.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 28, 2014
Probably no single episode did more to assure President Obama's 2012 re-election than that supposedly private fundraising lunch at which Mitt Romney famously declared that "47 percent of Americans" would never vote for him. The remark, unexpectedly captured on video, spread swiftly over the Internet and the airwaves, marking the hapless Mr. Romney in his own words as an elitist icon of the rich, unable or unwilling to comprehend how the other half...
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | August 15, 1997
WASHINGTON -- As the Teamsters union's strike against the United Parcel Service drags on, raising tempers on both sides and among inconvenienced customers, organized labor is launching a TV campaign to improve its image."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Staff | February 22, 2004
Love for Sale: A World History of Prostitution, by Nils Johan Ringdal. Grove Press. 464 pages. $26. When they call prostitution the world's oldest profession, they are wrong, but only by a few months. The domestication of animals probably came first. But, my guess is, ancient man used some of what he earned on that first cattle sale to pay for sex. That's not covered in Love for Sale, but Norwegian historian and author Nils Johan Ringdal covers just about everything else in this historical survey of prostitution: from the Old Testament to today's newspaper headlines.
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