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By Thomas F. Schaller | September 7, 2010
Another Labor Day has come and gone. The official unemployment rate nationwide hovers near 10 percent, and the effective rate — including as it does those no longer actively seeking employment — is even higher. Many who kept their jobs have taken pay cuts, suffered furloughs or are working reduced hours. Economists continue to debate whether the $787 billion stimulus package passed by Congress and signed by President Barack Obama in February 2009 was too small or too big, and whether or not it prevented the loss of millions more jobs and a deeper recession.
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NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | September 21, 2014
The man-made catastrophe known as the "Affordable Care Act" and "Obamacare" still lurks. And nobody should interpret the absence of daily negative headlines as a sign the law's myriad problems have been rectified, or that there is substance to Harry Reid's claim of "untrue" horror stories following the law's implementation. So, how much damage has been inflicted now that gross ineptitude in foreign policy has replaced gross ineptitude in health care policy? Let me count the ways … and lies.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2012
They're facing high unemployment, depressed wages and loads of debt — and they're only in their 20s. Welcome to life after college. Though the labor market is recovering slowly, graduates this spring have only slightly better chances of landing jobs than grads did in the depths of the recession, experts say. Over the last year, unemployment has averaged 9.4 percent for college graduates under age 25. Meanwhile, researchers at the Washington-based Economic...
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2014
Simone Knighten is hunting for a job. Hunting and hunting. The 20-year-old Baltimore resident thinks it's harder now than when she landed work at restaurants in the past two years. She's spending days at one of the city's Youth Opportunity centers, getting help with her search. "I've been looking since January," said Knighten, sitting in the West Baltimore building with brightly painted walls. "I've been going all around, calling back and everything, but it didn't seem like anything was working, so that's why I came here.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2003
The number of Americans filing initial claims for unemployment benefits inched up again last week, an unsettling trend that economists say bodes badly for hopes that the labor market will turn around soon. First-time applications rose by 3,000 to 422,000, the third week of increases and the highest figure in two months, according to seasonally adjusted statistics released yesterday by the U.S. Department of Labor. Consumer spending and other economic indicators paint a rosy picture of an improved economy, but experts say it won't have staying power if businesses don't start adding jobs.
NEWS
March 29, 2013
In his attempt to prove why we don't need a Labor Department, Matt Patterson ("Why do we need a Labor Department?" Mar. 22) unwittingly demonstrates just the opposite. Free market advocates like Mr. Patterson love to lionize the business sector, and there are indeed government agencies and programs that support and promote the employer side of the labor market. Commerce and the Small Business Administration come to mind. Even the Agriculture Department is charged with, among other goals, expanding markets for American agricultural products.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | May 24, 1995
Vartta Industries, a commercial and residential cabinet manufacturer, is leaving Linthicum for New Windsor in Carroll County, taking 75 jobs with it.The 15-year-old company, whose name means "rose" in Sanskrit, signed a lease for an 80,000-square-foot building on Avondale Road May 1 and is expected to be in full operation there June 1.The building is 12,000 square feet larger than its Linthicum plant, which is closing to allow for more expansion at Baltimore-Washington...
NEWS
By Michael Corbin | May 19, 2003
PROBLEMS PLAGUING the national economy are threatening to undermine some areas of social progress in Baltimore. Nowhere is this more ominously clear than in the precipitously declining employment prospects for Baltimore City's young people. With the end of the school year fast approaching and a few thousand more young people entering a labor market that does not want or need them, Baltimore faces a daunting challenge. Many of the city's most pressing problems (homicide, juvenile crime, the drug trade)
BUSINESS
April 20, 1992
Don't hang aroundEntrepreneurs who sell their businesses but try to stay on as top executives usually don't survive, according to a new study. And that may hamper the performance of the acquired firms, according to Kim A. Stewart, a University of Denver assistant management professor who is conducting the study.In her two-part study, Ms. Stewart is looking at the experiences of 515 CEOs of firms ranging from large to small, public to private.In the recently completed first phase, she found that 56 percent of the CEOs had left by the end of the first year after acquisition and 86 percent had departed by the second year.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2003
The number of Americans out of work dropped slightly last month, but economists said it wasn't necessarily an indication that finding a job has gotten any easier. The U.S. unemployment rate declined to 6.2 percent in July, down from a nine-year high of 6.4 percent in June. But the number of people in the labor force shrank by 556,000 to 146 million, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. About 470,000 people simply stopped looking for work out of fear that they wouldn't find anything, economists said.
NEWS
By Oren Levin-Waldman | December 23, 2013
Fast food workers in more than a hundred cities across the country went on strike for a $15 an hour wage earlier this month. They were calling it a strike for a livable wage. Fast food workers epitomize the low-skilled working poor in America, but a $15 an hour wage is not about poverty. Rather it speaks to their desire to become respected members of the middle class. Opponents, particularly those in the fast food industry and other low-wage employers, will naturally trot out the standard economic model that such an increase can only lead to lower employment.
NEWS
By Martha Holleman | September 1, 2013
Labor Day weekend - the annual celebration of the American worker and our last summer fling - seems also a fitting time to review the state of working Baltimore. The facts are these: •Baltimore City's unemployment rate, as of July, is 10.8 percent. That's almost 4 percentage points higher than the state's rate (at 7.1 percent) and equates to some 30,700 adults who are actively seeking work to support their families. •When added together with those who are no longer seeking work, according to the U.S. Census/American Community Survey, a full 46 percent of the city's adults between ages 16 and 64 are either unemployed or out of the labor force altogether.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Michael Lofthus, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2013
Jackie Carter had it all mapped out. She would attend college year-round and graduate early, land a job in criminal justice, start paying off student loans, move into her own apartment and invest in her first smartphone. But the 22-year-old Towson University graduate has seen her life after college veer off course. Carter, who graduated in December with a degree in sociology/anthropology with a criminal justice concentration, is living with her parents in Fallston, working as an intern and wondering whether her original goals are forever out of reach.
NEWS
March 29, 2013
In his attempt to prove why we don't need a Labor Department, Matt Patterson ("Why do we need a Labor Department?" Mar. 22) unwittingly demonstrates just the opposite. Free market advocates like Mr. Patterson love to lionize the business sector, and there are indeed government agencies and programs that support and promote the employer side of the labor market. Commerce and the Small Business Administration come to mind. Even the Agriculture Department is charged with, among other goals, expanding markets for American agricultural products.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2012
Borrowers overwhelmed by private student loan debt often discover an ugly truth too late — these loans can't be discharged in bankruptcy like other types of consumer loans. A new report on private student loans by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and the U.S. Department of Education suggests it may be time to change that. The agencies say these loans offer so little flexibility to struggling borrowers that Congress might consider revising the bankruptcy law given today's tough economy.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2012
They're facing high unemployment, depressed wages and loads of debt — and they're only in their 20s. Welcome to life after college. Though the labor market is recovering slowly, graduates this spring have only slightly better chances of landing jobs than grads did in the depths of the recession, experts say. Over the last year, unemployment has averaged 9.4 percent for college graduates under age 25. Meanwhile, researchers at the Washington-based Economic...
NEWS
By Leo Troy | September 1, 1997
NEWARK, N.J. -- The success of the Teamsters' strike at United Parcel Service has prompted union leaders, columnists, journalists and academics to predict a resurgence of unionism.Will it happen? In a word, no.On the contrary, more erosion in the share of private-sector jobs that are unionized can be expected. Global competition and structural changes in labor markets, the forces that have brought organized labor to its current low ebb, will not only continue, but grow.Unionization in the American private-sector work force has declined from its 1953 peak of 36 percent of the jobs to 10 percent today.
BUSINESS
By T. Shawn Taylor and T. Shawn Taylor,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 29, 2003
Barbara Scarborough can't catch a break. First, she lost her production job at a contact lens manufacturer after Sept. 11. "I had a 401(k) and benefits for the first time. That was a good job," said the 41-year-old single mother on Chicago's South Side. Then she was laid off in March from a packaging house. And in July, after working only a month as a part-time telephone market researcher, earning far less than before, she was laid off again. Scarborough had prospered during the 1990s economic boom, when blacks flooded the labor market.
NEWS
By Thomas F. Schaller | September 7, 2010
Another Labor Day has come and gone. The official unemployment rate nationwide hovers near 10 percent, and the effective rate — including as it does those no longer actively seeking employment — is even higher. Many who kept their jobs have taken pay cuts, suffered furloughs or are working reduced hours. Economists continue to debate whether the $787 billion stimulus package passed by Congress and signed by President Barack Obama in February 2009 was too small or too big, and whether or not it prevented the loss of millions more jobs and a deeper recession.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2010
Sudesna Batajoo had resigned herself to another summer job in retail sales. The 20-year-old rising Loyola University junior faced one of the worst job markets in decades and feared she would never get an internship related to her business major, much less one that paid. But then came the unexpected: three offers. After sharply scaling back during the recession, many companies are again expanding internship programs. Both employers and university career centers are seeing stronger demand for interns this year.
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