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By PAUL W. BOLTZ | September 6, 1993
The essential point to grasp is that in dealing with capitalism we are dealing with an evolutionary process. --Joseph A. Schumpeter, ''Capitalism, Socialism, and Democracy.'' Payroll employment in the United States has climbed by well over 1 million so far this year, and yet scarcely a day passes without a news report of vast layoffs at some company or other. We are barraged with reports of defense-industry layoffs, cutbacks at giant computer firms, staff reductions at major retailers; even layoffs at foreign firms like Daimler Benz now merit national news time.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
Colonial Players' current production of Melanie Marnich's "These Shining Lives" tells the story of four young women in the early 1920s and 1930s who seize their chance at the American dream by finding employment at the Westclox Radium Dial Company. Marnich's poetic rendering of this true story had its world premiere six years ago at Center Stage in Baltimore, where it became a finalist for the Susan Smith Blackburn Prize and the Weissberger Award. The play's opening lines introduce its full dimensions: "This isn't a fairy tale, though it starts like one. It's not a tragedy, though it ends like one. It's something else.
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NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | June 6, 1993
Fewer people were actively looking for work between March and April, as Carroll County's unemployment rate dropped from 7 percent to 6 percent in April, Maryland Department of $l Economic and Employment Development officials said Friday.Many workers who were temporarily laid off during the survey period might not have filed for unemployment insurance, further lowering the rate, officials said. The number of people filing for unemployment insurance fell from 4,787 in March to 4,019 in April.
NEWS
May 6, 2014
The U.S. unemployment rate dropped to 6.3 percent in April from 6.7 percent in March, the lowest it has been since September 2008, when it was 6.1 percent. However , The Bureau of Labor Statistics does not count people who have given up looking for work as unemployed. There are still more than 92 million Americans who remain out of the work force. The bureau noted that the civilian labor force dropped by 806,000 last month, following an increase of 503,000 in March. The number of Americans who are not in the work force rose in April to over 92.5 million, nearly 1 million more than in the previous month, when 91.6 million were not in the labor force, including an aging population that is continuing to head into retirement.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | February 3, 1996
The news on Maryland's job front is good -- but not too good.Unemployment in Maryland fell 0.5 percent in December, but the dip to an impressive-sounding 4.5 percent rate came mostly because the state's labor force shrank by 31,000 workers, masking the loss of 16,000 jobs from November.An even 5.0 percent of Maryland's workers were out of work in November. "If unemployment fell, that's always good news," said Michael A. Conte, director of the University of Baltimore's Regional Economic Studies Program.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 27, 2003
PITTSBURGH - Worn down by job searches that have stretched for months, demoralized by disappointing offers or outright rejections, some unemployed people have simply stopped the search. As the United States enters a third year of difficult economic times, these unemployed - from factory workers to investment bankers - have dropped out of the labor force and entered the invisible ranks of people not counted in the unemployment rate. Some are going back to school or getting new job training.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2005
Maryland employers added 2,000 jobs in February, but unemployment inched upward as the labor force swelled, the Labor Department said yesterday. The jobless rate rose to 4.2 percent from 4.1 percent in January, adjusted for the effect of seasonal variations. That remains well below the national unemployment rate of 5.4 percent. The strongest Maryland industries during the month of February were leisure and hospitality; professional and business services; and trade, transportation and utilities.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2012
Maryland employers added 1,500 jobs in March - thanks entirely to growth in the private sector - but the state's unemployment rate inched up as the pool of would-be workers expanded more rapidly. The jobless rate was 6.6 percent in March, up from 6.5 percent in February, the U.S. Department of Labor estimated Friday. That's because the labor force, the number of adults working or looking for work, grew by 4,200 people in March, according to the agency. An improving economic situation typically brings out more job seekers, as people who had been discouraged by earlier difficulties get back in the hunt.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2005
Maryland employers added nearly 5,000 jobs last month, helping nudge the unemployment rate down to 4.2 percent, the U.S. Labor Department said yesterday. The agency also reported that the state's labor force of 2.9 million soared by 20,500 people in May, an unusually large monthly increase that could signal growing faith in the economy - though local economists warned that the figure is based on preliminary data and will probably be revised downward. Labor force and unemployment numbers are culled from a separate survey than job creation numbers, which explains why they don't add up. But everything points to the same conclusion about the economy, experts said.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | March 3, 2013
Those of you paying attention have noticed that the Obama administration is actually doing what it promised: transforming America into a gigantic welfare state. And there are plenty of takers willing to cash in on it and "get mine. " Numbers don't lie. Forty percent of the population was on some form of public assistance when the president took office; today, that number stands at 55 percent. And fraud is rampant. "Exhibit A" is the Social Security Disability Insurance program (SSDI)
NEWS
May 1, 2014
As an advocate for returning citizens, I can truly say Monday was a great day for the city of Baltimore. For individuals to finally be judged by their merits, work experience and skill, gives individuals hope ( "Council passes 'Ban the Box' legislation," April 29). The business community will benefit greatly from an untapped labor force - a labor force that is comprised of extraordinarily dedicated workers. When individuals with a criminal background are given a chance in the workforce, they are the first to arrive and the last to leave because they are grateful that someone thought enough about them to give them an opportunity.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
Maryland's employment base shrank by nearly 10,000 jobs in January and grew at a much weaker pace last year than originally estimated, the federal government said Monday. The state had about 23,000 more jobs in December than a year earlier, down from the initial report of 36,000 additional jobs, according to the U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics. That revision is enough to change 2013 from the state's best year since the recession to its worst for job creation.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
Maryland employers added 7,300 jobs in December, a strong end to a year with the most job creation since 2004, the federal government estimated Tuesday. The state's businesses and government agencies added 36,000 jobs in 2013, modestly better than the year before despite losses in some months as federal contractors and other employers struggled with budget cuts under sequestration. Most of the gains came in the private sector. Government agencies accounted for 300 of the jobs added last month and 1,900 of the jobs added last year, according to the U.S. Department of Labor estimates.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | March 3, 2013
Those of you paying attention have noticed that the Obama administration is actually doing what it promised: transforming America into a gigantic welfare state. And there are plenty of takers willing to cash in on it and "get mine. " Numbers don't lie. Forty percent of the population was on some form of public assistance when the president took office; today, that number stands at 55 percent. And fraud is rampant. "Exhibit A" is the Social Security Disability Insurance program (SSDI)
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2012
Maryland employers added 1,500 jobs in March - thanks entirely to growth in the private sector - but the state's unemployment rate inched up as the pool of would-be workers expanded more rapidly. The jobless rate was 6.6 percent in March, up from 6.5 percent in February, the U.S. Department of Labor estimated Friday. That's because the labor force, the number of adults working or looking for work, grew by 4,200 people in March, according to the agency. An improving economic situation typically brings out more job seekers, as people who had been discouraged by earlier difficulties get back in the hunt.
BUSINESS
Jay Hancock and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 2, 2011
As the wire reports say, November's unemployment drop from 9.0 percent to 8.6 percent puts the jobless rate at its lowest point in more than two years. But there are still more than 13 million unemployed folks -- Americans who want to work, have looked for a job in recent weeks and haven't been hired. And that doesn't count the folks who have given up. If you want to work but you're not actively looking for a job, you're not counted as unemployed. Hundreds of thousands seem to have given up looking last month, which is what partly explains the drop in unemployment.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | September 8, 1991
The county's unemployment rate essentially remained stable in July, state figures released Friday show.The state Department of Economic and Employment Development reported that Carroll's jobless rate was 5.1 percent in July, compared to 5.2 percent in June.In July 1990, county unemployment was 4.0 percent.The national rate for August remained unchanged at 6.8 percent, the Labor Department reported Friday. (U.S. numbers are one month ahead of state numbers.)Only four fewer people were employed in July in the county than were in June, DEED said.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | November 6, 1994
Carroll County's unemployment rate remained stable at 3.9 percent from August to September, a period that state economic development officials said usually shows an increase in joblessness.Statewide, the unemployment rate rose slightly, from 5.1 percent in August to 5.2 percent in September, said Marco Merrick, spokesman for the state Department of Economic and Employment Development."Even though the unemployment rate went up, it's not a drastic increase," he said Friday. "This is the norm, and it's a good norm because it's not as significant as it could be."
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2011
Maryland's unemployment rate improved in October as employers added 3,100 jobs, a bit of good news for residents to chew on heading into Thanksgiving and - retailers hope - holiday shopping. The state's jobless rate dropped to 7.2 percent from 7.4 percent in September, the U.S. Department of Labor said Tuesday. The job growth estimates suggest that 60 percent of the net gains came from the private sector in October, with most of the rest coming from state government agencies. Job growth has bumped up and down over the past year, producing only a relative inching-up in employment - to the chagrin of the more than 215,000 unemployed Marylanders.
NEWS
September 17, 2011
For some time, I have been reading about the problems created by the vast number of baby boomers reaching retirement age. This week, I became part of the problem. After almost 34 years writing for The Baltimore Sun, I am saying so long. I applied for a buyout - or voluntary separation plan - that the newspaper offered, and since acceptance was based on seniority and I have been around longer than the presses that print the paper, I was a shoo-in. As my last day approached, I prepared to leave the labor force by doing some research about the group I am joining: the retired.
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