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Labor Dispute

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SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | February 9, 2010
While the NFL's union and management suits prepare to tarnish another one of our favorite pastimes with a protracted labor dispute, I'd like to join in the chorus of common sense. I certainly will not be the first to caution the owners and players that they've got too much going for them to turn pro football into a collective bargaining trainwreck. The warning signs have become more and more visible over the past year. Former Ravens coach Brian Billick even devoted a large chunk of his recent book -- "More Than a Game" -- to the notion that everyone associated with the NFL has way too much to lose in this greedy game of chicken.
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NEWS
July 8, 2014
The tentative contract reached early Tuesday between Johns Hopkins Hospital and the labor union representing about 2,000 of its service workers represents a victory not only for the hospital and members of 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East but for Baltimore. The contract raises wages, in some case dramatically so, allowing Hopkins to set an example of what a "living wage" can mean for the health and security of workers in this city. It was a hard-fought effort that included a three-day strike in April and, more recently, intervention by Gov. Martin O'Malley to avert another such action.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
Discord has erupted within the longshoremen's union at the heart of the labor dispute at the port of Baltimore, with some members calling for an end to the union's standoff with port employers and others promising to push on. The dissension is growing as the standoff begins to affect trade. Some customers have diverted cargo, fearing a second labor disruption in four months, a development some longshoreman believe portends more trouble for the business they depend on for survival.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley's intervention in the wage fight between Johns Hopkins Hospital and its service workers reflects the lingering dispute's significance but also signals that it may be resolved soon. The hospital and members of the 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East labor union, which represents 2,000 Hopkins workers, went back to the bargaining table Tuesday after the governor asked them to take a cooling-off period. Union leaders also called off a four-day strike that was to have begun Friday.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
The port of Baltimore's continuing labor dispute, which boiled over in a three-day dockworkers strike in October before a three-month "cooling-off" period, now simmers with uncertainty. Labor peace in the port seems precarious. A contract covering the handling of vehicles and other local matters has expired, and workers voted down a new contract. The union says it won't strike and management says it won't lock out the dockworkers. The only certainty is that the port has lost work, and some of it might never return, port officials said.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley's intervention in the wage fight between Johns Hopkins Hospital and its service workers reflects the lingering dispute's significance but also signals that it may be resolved soon. The hospital and members of the 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East labor union, which represents 2,000 Hopkins workers, went back to the bargaining table Tuesday after the governor asked them to take a cooling-off period. Union leaders also called off a four-day strike that was to have begun Friday.
FEATURES
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 15, 2004
HOLLYWOOD -- A labor dispute at the Century Plaza Hotel in Century City left Hollywood producers scrambling to find other venues to stage their annual black-tie awards shows. The Producers Guild of America, which had scheduled its show at the hotel for Jan. 22, found a last-minute reprieve when the new owners of Culver Studios offered one of its large sound stages for the producers' dinner as well as its historic New York street on the back lot for guests to mingle and drink cocktails before and after the show.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Sun Staff Writer | May 4, 1995
Forget the popular notion that everybody was a loser during the long, boring baseball labor dispute. The real umpires went back to work yesterday, and, make no mistake about it, they came back as clear-cut winners.There might have been some some anxious moments, but even the players have to be envious of the settlement negotiated in baseball's "other" labor dispute. Don Fehr, executive director of the players association, always drives a good bargain for his clients, but he'll be hard-pressed to match the deal made by Richie Phillips, his counterpart for the umpires.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | September 28, 2012
Thursday night's game between the Ravens and Cleveland Browns was relatively uneventful, which is just the way the NFL wanted it. The regular refs parachuted in after the resolution of the labor dispute -- got a nice ovation when they took the field at M&T Bank Stadium -- and did something we haven't seen in awhile. They took control of the game. That was Job One. Sure, they threw their share of flags and even dropped a costly unsportsmanlike penalty on the Browns bench late in the game.
NEWS
February 9, 1995
Barely a week from what should be the start of baseball's spring training, major league owners and players are no closer to settling their labor dispute than they were six months ago. When the president of the United States can't jawbone a settlement in a labor dispute with high public interest, a voluntary agreement is nowhere near in sight. And Mr. Clinton's call on Congress to impose binding arbitration holds little promise.Union leaders have long seemed to be relying on eventual federal action of one sort or another to break the deadlock with the owners.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
The port of Baltimore's continuing labor dispute, which boiled over in a three-day dockworkers strike in October before a three-month "cooling-off" period, now simmers with uncertainty. Labor peace in the port seems precarious. A contract covering the handling of vehicles and other local matters has expired, and workers voted down a new contract. The union says it won't strike and management says it won't lock out the dockworkers. The only certainty is that the port has lost work, and some of it might never return, port officials said.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
Discord has erupted within the longshoremen's union at the heart of the labor dispute at the port of Baltimore, with some members calling for an end to the union's standoff with port employers and others promising to push on. The dissension is growing as the standoff begins to affect trade. Some customers have diverted cargo, fearing a second labor disruption in four months, a development some longshoreman believe portends more trouble for the business they depend on for survival.
SPORTS
November 14, 2012
Drop egos and drop puck Harvey Fialkov Sun Sentinel Absolutely. It's no secret that NHL Players' Association chief Donald Fehr plays hardball. Ask baseball fans about the cancellation of the 1994 World Series. This is the third work stoppage under the condescending guidance of NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman, including the entire 2004-05 season. Let Fehr's brother, Steve, and deputy commissioner Bill Daly iron out any contractual issues. The billionaire owners should absorb the lockout costs because they turned the key. There's time to salvage the season.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | September 28, 2012
Thursday night's game between the Ravens and Cleveland Browns was relatively uneventful, which is just the way the NFL wanted it. The regular refs parachuted in after the resolution of the labor dispute -- got a nice ovation when they took the field at M&T Bank Stadium -- and did something we haven't seen in awhile. They took control of the game. That was Job One. Sure, they threw their share of flags and even dropped a costly unsportsmanlike penalty on the Browns bench late in the game.
NEWS
September 24, 2012
On Sunday night, Ravens fans spoke for millions of fellow football fans across the nation when they repeatedly thundered an 8-letter response to what might easily have been the worst officiated professional football game ever held at M&T Bank Stadium. For much of the end of the 4 t h quarter, and even as the Ravens came back to defeat the New England Patriots with a last-second field goal that, appropriately enough, was disputed by the losing team, the crowd seemed to speak with one (very loud)
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2011
Because of a disagreement between the Harford County executive and teachers union, teachers and others who work for the school system will not receive a $1,250 bonus like every other county employee this year. After County Executive David R. Craig introduced legislation in November for council approval of the one-time bonuses for all county employees, the teachers' union said it couldn't accept the payments because of collective-bargaining laws. The teachers union has been involved in a continuing dispute with the school board over raises.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | February 1, 1995
The city of Chicago once sweated out a strike by firefighters. It was a very nervous time. Every building and every person in those buildings was at risk.But I don't remember the president of the United States saying he was going to step in and somehow get the firefighters to return to work before somebody burned to death.As dangerous as the strike was to Chicagoans, it was a municipal labor dispute -- none of the federal government's business -- and it had to be settled by municipal officials and the firefighters' union.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | September 1, 2002
NEW YORK -- The new labor agreement reached by Major League Baseball and the players union signals four years of temporary labor peace, but it does not guarantee a cure for the game's economic problems and does not assure a warm and fuzzy relationship between the players and owners. What it does is keep the game on the field without a labor-related interruption for the first time since 1972, and it gives the industry a chance to improve competitive balance between the high-revenue and low-revenue franchises.
SPORTS
By Bloomberg News | July 15, 2011
Negotiators for the NFL and its players are near an agreement on rookie pay, clearing a major obstacle toward reaching a new labor accord and reopening football a week before training camps are scheduled to start, three people familiar with the talks said. Rookie pay dominated negotiations this week after the sides neared a deal on how to divide a projected $9.3 billion in revenue that would give just less than half to players, according to the people, who were granted anonymity because they weren't authorized to discuss the talks publicly.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray, THE BALTIMORE SUN | April 28, 2011
Told twice in three days by a federal judge to abandon its contentious lockout, the NFL set a timetable Thursday to return to the business of football. If only it were that easy. After six weeks on the outside, players finally will be permitted to enter team facilities Friday morning for the purpose of working out, receiving medical treatment, collecting playbooks and getting instruction from coaches. Ravens wide receiver Derrick Mason said he will make an appearance at the team's Owings Mills facility.
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