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By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2011
John Fritze has a must-read front-page story about a new Labor Department requirement that would compel businesses to increase the wages of their foreign, seasonal workers. The new rule could have a crippling effect on the seafood processors that have come to rely on these workers, some say. Here's the article , which has voices from the industry, politicians and advocates for the poor weighing in the new requirement, which is set to begin on Sept. 30. UPDATE: Mikulski takes her concerns directly to White House after Labor Department rebuff.
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NEWS
August 19, 2014
The headline on the news release out of Maryland's Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation yesterday sounded pretty great: "Private Sector Gains 18,700 Jobs Over-the-Year. " Read the body of the release, though, and you'll discover the actual news was not so great. In July, it says, Maryland actually lost 9,000 jobs, one of the worst performances in the nation and a distinct outlier in a month when 36 states and Washington, D.C., gained jobs. Not that the agency was dwelling on that.
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NEWS
March 29, 2013
In his attempt to prove why we don't need a Labor Department, Matt Patterson ("Why do we need a Labor Department?" Mar. 22) unwittingly demonstrates just the opposite. Free market advocates like Mr. Patterson love to lionize the business sector, and there are indeed government agencies and programs that support and promote the employer side of the labor market. Commerce and the Small Business Administration come to mind. Even the Agriculture Department is charged with, among other goals, expanding markets for American agricultural products.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | July 29, 2014
The Labor Department is expected to report this week that the economy added 235,000 jobs in July, and the unemployment rate remained steady at 6.1 percent. But that hardly tells the story. The jobless rate may be down from its recession peak of 10 percent, but much of this results from adults - discouraged by the lack of decent job openings - having given up altogether. They are neither employed nor looking for work. Only about half of the drop in the adult participation rate may be attributed to the Baby Boom generation reaching retirement age. Lacking adequate resources to retire, a larger percentage of adults over 65 are working now than before the recession.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2011
Not me, of course, but lots of workers complain about their bosses. In fact, tens of thousands of employees each year go so far as to take their concerns to the Department of Labor — more grievances than the agency can handle. Now there's backup help. The Labor Department has established a first-of-its-kind program with the American Bar Association. The agency would put workers whose complaints it won't take up in touch with private employment lawyers. The Bridge to Justice program focuses on potential violations of overtime, minimum wage and family medical leave laws.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2010
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. accused the O'Malley administration Monday of meddling with state labor department operations for political gain, releasing documents that illustrate how employees removed a downbeat jobs assessment from their website after what workers said was pressure "from the top. " The documents, including e-mails obtained by Republicans through a public information request, show labor department officials scrambling to expunge an internal...
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2013
Six weeks after taking over the U.S. Department of Labor, Marylander Thomas E. Perez is receiving praise from unions, concern from business leaders and hope from others that he will expand the agency's mission. Perez, a former Maryland labor secretary, has stepped into the Cabinet post as the agency considers new regulations that could affect pay and working conditions for millions of Americans, from stonecutters to home health care workers. And labor analysts say the 51-year-old Takoma Park man may also be more able than past secretaries to move the agency beyond its traditional role as an enforcer of labor laws, giving it more influence over economic policy and the nation's stubbornly high unemployment.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
The U.S. Department of Labor announced Monday that it sued the former CEO of Baltimore Behavioral Health Inc. for failing to deposit workers' contributions into the company's retirement plan. Baltimore Behavioral Health, or BBH, is a drug treatment and mental health clinic on West Pratt Street that filed for bankruptcy protection from its creditors last year. It also was the subject of a 2010 investigation by The Baltimore Sun, which uncovered unusually high Medicaid billings and steep salaries among the family members who at the time controlled the Baltimore nonprofit.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2010
Maryland's private-sector employers picked up the pace in October, helping propel the state to a 5,900-job gain despite cuts by government agencies. The U.S. Department of Labor estimated Tuesday that the private sector in Maryland added 7,000 jobs, from high-tech to retail. That's one of the highest one-month gains in the past five years and the biggest jump since employment began rebounding in March. Government employment dropped by 1,100 jobs, the federal agency estimated. The figures, which are preliminary, are adjusted to account for seasonal fluctuations in hiring and layoffs.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2012
Maryland employers added nearly 25,000 jobs last year, according to new estimates - the best performance since 2006, but one that still leaves the state with more than 80,000 jobs to make up, given the recession's losses. At this rate of employment growth, it will take Maryland until 2015 to dig out of the job-loss hole. Getting back to a truly normal employment situation would take even longer because population growth calls for the constant creation of new jobs. Economist Richard Clinch thinks Marylanders shouldn't count on faster job growth this year because efforts to rein in the federal budget are rippling through the state's sizable base of government contractors.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance and Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
Summer's arrival brought Maryland a slight uptick in unemployment despite a larger-than-normal employment bump in June, but it also contributed to significantly more job losses in May than previously thought, state labor officials said Friday. Maryland employers added 7,700 jobs last month, with the strongest gains in tourism-related industries, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. But the bureau revised May's losses to 6,800 jobs, substantially worse than preliminary estimates of 1,300 fewer jobs.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
The former CEO of Baltimore Behavioral Health Inc. was ordered to pay $60,750 for failing to deposit workers' contributions in the organization's retirement plan, the Department of Labor announced Thursday. BBH, a non profit drug treatment and mental health clinic on West Pratt Street, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in December 2012. The clinic was found in a 2010 Baltimore Sun investigation to have unusually high Medicaid billings and steep salaries among family members who previously operated the center.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
Operators of nine McDonald's in the Baltimore area and on the Eastern Shore agreed to pay more than $250,000 in back wages and damages to 138 workers for violations of minimum wage, overtime and child labor provisions, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Tuesday. Annapolis-based franchise operators Gold Hat Inc. and Gold Hat II Inc., which have the same owner, will also pay $4,300 in civil penalties for the child labor violations, under the agreement. "The restaurant industry employs some of the most at-risk workers that we see," Mark Lara, director of the Labor Department's wage and hour division's Baltimore district office, said in a statement.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Maryland lost 600 jobs in February but also saw its overall unemployment rate dip to 5.7 percent, in part thanks to a revision of much steeper losses reported in January, according to new estimates from the U.S. Department of Labor. February's unemployment rate, a hair lower than January's revised 5.8 percent, is the lowest in the state since November 2008. Despite the hundreds of job losses estimated in February, January's reported reduction of 9,800 jobs was revised to a loss of 6,100 jobs.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
Winner Distributing Co., the Anheuser-Busch distributor for Baltimore and parts of Baltimore County, will lay off 125 workers at the end of the month, the company said in a notice to Maryland's labor department. The layoffs are the result of a plant closure at the business on Canton Center Drive in eastern Baltimore County, according to the Jan. 29 notice to the state Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation. Marc M. Winner, Winner's president, did not respond to a request for comment Wednesday.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
Maryland employers added 7,300 jobs in December, a strong end to a year with the most job creation since 2004, the federal government estimated Tuesday. The state's businesses and government agencies added 36,000 jobs in 2013, modestly better than the year before despite losses in some months as federal contractors and other employers struggled with budget cuts under sequestration. Most of the gains came in the private sector. Government agencies accounted for 300 of the jobs added last month and 1,900 of the jobs added last year, according to the U.S. Department of Labor estimates.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
A California-based unit of Legg Mason Inc. agreed to pay more than $21 million to settle government charges that it defrauded clients by not properly informing them of losses caused by improper investments and by engineering trades between clients that shorted the sellers. The Securities and Exchange Commission announced the settlement in conjunction with the Department of Labor on Monday, identifying actions that they allege occurred at Western Asset Management Co. between 2007 and 2010.
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