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NEWS
April 3, 2011
Perhaps The Sun failed to report this in May 2010, but I do not remember hearing about an arbitration finding for the unionized workers of the Maryland Transit Administration. Actually, I don't remember ever reading anything over the years in regard to contract negotiations between the MTA and the transit union. Yet, in cities like Philadelphia, New York, Boston and others, contract negotiation updates are regularly provided by those transit agencies. Why are we not seeing that in Maryland?
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NEWS
Peter Crispino and For The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
In the 2.3 acres surrounding Asbury Broadneck United Methodist Church, a subtle link to local history lies in a cemetery that dates back nearly 200 years. At least 1,800 graves - few with headstones, many belonging to former slaves - are on the grounds, each bearing a story and a key to the past. For the past 15 months, a dedicated team from the church has worked to identify each person buried there and perhaps even discover their stories. "It's important that we know who helped pave the way for us, because if this generation does not do it, I don't know what the next generation will do," said Elinor Thompson, who has led the effort.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | April 4, 2012
Women spend longer in labor than they did 50 years ago, according to a new study from the National Institutes of Health . The study of 140,000 deliveries said the main reason may be due to changes in delivery room practices. The study, published online in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, compared childbirth data in the early 1960s to data from the early 2000s. Researchers found that the first stage of labor -- when the cervix dilates but there's no pushing -- increased by 2.6 hours for first-time mothers.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
- Marylander Thomas E. Perez, who has served as secretary of the U.S. Department of Labor for a little more than a year, is now being eyed for an even more prominent position in President Barack Obama's second-term Cabinet: successor to Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. Perez, a former Maryland labor secretary and Justice Department official, is emerging as a candidate in part because of his extensive legal background but also because he has...
NEWS
February 23, 2011
The Effort by the governor of Wisconsin to restrict collective bargaining by labor unions is an unacceptable infringement on the rights of its citizens ("Wisconsin's governor to senators: Come home" Feb. 22). But the sad truth is that it demonstrates a rare sober effort by any government official in the U.S. to act seriously to diminish gross budgetary problems. It is sad that our federal government buckled to political pressures to extend Bush's tax reductions for our wealthiest citizens and that we are now asking middle class union members in Wisconsin and other citizens to pay the price for irresponsible spending.
NEWS
October 21, 2010
On behalf of my family I want to thank a number of very special people who made it possible for the clean up of the 19th century Saint Vincent DePaul cemetery in Clifton Park. First to Father Lawrence and his parish for allowing the six-acre site to be cleared and providing the matching funds to hire a contractor to clear the trash and underbrush from the site. To Jacques Kelly of The Baltimore Sun for his excellent news articles describing the progress of the cemetery clearing as well as the human-interest stories from the descendants of the families buried there.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2011
Leona K. Frederick, a retired New York State Department of Labor interviewer who was a descendant of Harriet Tubman, died Jan. 5 of pulmonary hypertension at Gilchrist Hospice Care. She was 89. Leona Keene was born and raised at 830 N. Bond St. She was a 1938 graduate of Frederick Douglass High School. She later moved to Philadelphia and then Brooklyn, N.Y., where she earned a bachelor's degree from the City University of New York. Mrs. Frederick worked for the City of New York and later was a hospital dietitian before taking a job in 1977 as an employment security clerk for the New York State Department of Labor.
NEWS
By Mark Morrill | January 14, 2013
The political wisdom of today declares that the middle class must be rescued, but it's the lower class that is the most endangered segment of America. The working poor are squeezed between pressure from illegal labor and a stagnant economy. The health of this segment of our citizenry is essential to the restoration and maintenance of our national health. Indeed, history demonstrates that a society dependent upon surrogate labor is a society in decay. Given all the attention paid these days to Civil War anniversaries, the Antebellum South provides an example worth revisiting.
NEWS
By GERMOND & WITCOVER | March 14, 1992
DetroitEver since former Gov. Edmund G. "Jerry" Brown Jr. of California entered the race for the 1992 Democratic presidential nomination, the rap against him has been that there is nothing wrong with his message of the corrupting influence of money in politics that couldn't be cured with another messenger.The argument is that "Governor Moonbeam" can't be nominated or elected, and that attitude is particularly pertinent in Michigan in advance of Tuesday's primary.With labor's favorite candidate, Sen. Tom Harkin of Iowa, out of the race, the important labor vote here is up for grabs, and by all rights Mr. Brown should have a strong claim on it as a result of his pro-labor record as governor.
NEWS
By Gilbert A.Lewthwaite and Gilbert A.Lewthwaite,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 2, 1990
BLACKPOOL -- Britain's Labor Party, poll-positioned for electoral victory on current performance, celebrated yesterday its political ascendancy with a series of swinging attacks on the past 11 years of Thatcherism.Lambasting the government's economic management, industrial policy and education reforms, Labor opened its annual conference here with a claim to be a viable alternative government.It hit Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher particularly hard where it hurts most these days -- on the economy.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Maryland received a roughly $400,000 bonus Monday for its crackdown on businesses that misclassify workers, part of more than $2 million the state won in federal grants. It is the first time the U.S. Department of Labor has focused funding on efforts to combat worker misclassification. The bonus is a portion of nearly $100 million in grants the U.S. Department of Labor announced Monday. About $1.14 million of the funding is to help Maryland adopt new technologies in unemployment insurance programs.
NEWS
September 3, 2014
A post-Labor Day start for Maryland public schools is a very good idea ( "Late start a non-starter," Sept. 2). It is also the recommendation of a state task force appointed by Gov. Martin O'Malley and which included public school teachers, parents of students in public elementary, middle and high schools as well as members of the General Assembly. Much like members of a jury, task force members gave full consideration to the positions of supporters and opponents of this concept.
NEWS
September 1, 2014
Students go back to school for the first time Tuesday in only one school system in Maryland. That would be Worcester County, home of Ocean City where the lure of sun, sand - and the availability of teen labor - convinced the local school board to rewrite the academic calendar for the 2014-2015 year. Elsewhere, public school systems opened last week, and they appear universally satisfied with their choice. That 23 of Maryland's 24 school systems continue to prefer a pre-Labor Day starting date would seem to present a teachable moment to everyone but Comptroller Peter Franchot, who continues his quixotic crusade to force a longer summer break.
NEWS
By Alexander E. Hooke | September 1, 2014
Ask some neighbors or colleagues about their Labor Day weekend tomorrow, and prepare to hear how busy it was. Several malls featured back to school sales, kids had a baseball tournament, lots of e-mails to catch up with at work, and the house needed some cleaning. We're too busy, goes the lament, to enjoy free time. Yet social scientists claim that the average work week for full-time employees since 1970 has fluctuated between 39 and 41 hours. This claim does include a range of variations.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
Vacationers heading back to the Baltimore area from the Eastern Shore Monday night were experiencing some of the worst traffic of the summer. As late as 8 p.m., cars heading westbound were backed up to Exit 42, the east side of Kent Narrows Bridge, or about 5.4 miles from the Bay Bridge, according to a recorded traffic report. There were no delays for eastbound traffic, according to the traffic report. mary.mccauley@baltsun.com
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
A ruling by a federal judge in a lawsuit filed by federal employees over the government shutdown last fall has given the workers hope that they could soon be eligible for a payout. U.S. Court of Federal Claims Chief Judge Patricia Campbell-Smith declined to dismiss the lawsuit brought by some 2,000 workers who were deemed essential during the during the 16-day shutdown. The plaintiffs worked through the shutdown but didn't get paid on time for their labor. Campbell-Smith wrote in an opinion that the federal government violated the Fair Labor Standards Act, but she didn't go as far as saying that the government needed to pay the plaintiffs.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2003
Dominic N. Fornaro, a former Baltimore steelworker and union leader who was Maryland's labor commissioner in the early 1980s, died Tuesday at Maryland Shock Trauma Center of complications from a fall. The Denton resident was 84. Nick Fornaro was born in Clarksburg, W.Va., the eldest of five children of Italian immigrants. His family soon moved to Baltimore, and his father went to work for Bethlehem Steel Corp. Mr. Fornaro attended city schools but left Patterson Park High at age 18 to take a job at the Bethlehem Steel shipyard.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 30, 2014
Like Thanksgiving, Labor Day is a national holiday. Unlike Thanksgiving, it does not have an official meal. One-hundred-and-twenty years on, it's time we had one. I'm nominating the peppers-and-eggs sandwich as the official meal of Labor Day, and I'll tell you why in a moment. First, some declarations. 1. Most people only think of Labor Day as a day off at the end of summer, or a good day to buy a dishwasher. Lost is its original meaning: a "national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity and well-being of our country.
NEWS
August 29, 2014
This schedule will be in effect Monday: Government offices Closed in Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll, Harford, Howard and Frederick counties, and in Baltimore City and Annapolis. Courts Closed in all jurisdictions. Public schools Closed in all jurisdictions. Libraries Closed in all jurisdictions. Trash No pickup in Anne Arundel, Baltimore and Howard counties, and in Baltimore City (landfills and transfer stations closed)
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