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By Michael Dresser | November 8, 2000
1999 Francis Coppola Diamond Series Chardonnay, Gold Label ($15). The famed director's Napa Valley winery has expanded its line of wines with generally impressive results. This well-balanced, medium- to full-bodied California chardonnay shows a stylishness and vibrant character that is increasingly hard to find in this price range. It offers fresh flavors of apple, pear, lemon, toast and a subtle seasoning of white pepper. There's a soft, gentle texture to the wine, but good acidity in the finish.
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FEATURES
By Randy Lewis and Randy Lewis,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 24, 2003
Flat-out denials from representatives for Paul McCartney, Yoko Ono and a Los Angeles recording studio have not persuaded the curator of an auction Web site that a tape box doesn't prove the Beatles held a secret reunion in 1976. "Anything other than denials from the Beatles camp would be shocking," says Gary Zimet of the Moments in Time site (www.momentsintime.com). The Ampex tape box with the titles of five songs, a date (11-2-76) and performers listed as John, Paul, George and Rich, remains on the site.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2001
Morningbird Records has come out swinging. The Columbia company, which started in 1999 promoting its Christian singing groups over the Internet, has had its Christian jazz group, praise-and-worship ensemble and contemporary Christian band broadcast on radio stations in Australia and Zambia after the music is downloaded off the Internet. Their music is on the shelves in area Christian bookstores as well as at Record and Tape Traders and the Borders bookstore in Columbia. Since 1999, the label has sold more than 6,000 compact discs.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | November 23, 1990
"Motown 30: What's Going On" is much, much more than a celebration of the three-plus decades of this record label -- it is at once a variety show as old-fashioned as Ed Sullivan, and on the cutting edge as much as Keenan Ivory Wayans.But more importantly, producers Suzanne DePasse and Don Mischer have built this show around a theme -- the demonstration of how, during the last four decades, African-American contributions to the arts moved from the marginal to the mainstream, from the street corners of the do-wop singers to the Top 40 charts, from the 15-minute show Nat King Cole briefly had in 1957 to the hit that "In Living Color" has become in 1990.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison | July 1, 2004
Again and again, she made me smile that year. And just when I thought she'd be around for a while, just when I thought she'd lift me into the stratosphere with more of her music -- poof! -- the girl was gone. Adriana Evans is the mysterious songstress whose CD stayed in my changer and Walkman for an entire year, filling my headphones day in and out. I still play her album regularly. In '97, my sophomore year at the University of Arkansas, the San Francisco-raised artist dropped her self-titled debut.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2012
When the biggest rap tour of the season stops by 1st Mariner Arena on Saturday, opening act Machine Gun Kelly will provide a stark contrast to the flashy, dipped-in-gold Maybach Music Group trio of Wale, Meek Mill and headliner Rick Ross. While the MMG clique presents a cool, almost icy demeanor in its songs, the 22-year-old Cleveland rapper, born Richard Colson Baker, takes the opposite approach, fearlessly spitting double-time flows in the face of the audience. When his rapid-fire delivery fails to spark the crowd, MGK keeps a battering ram of a single in his back pocket.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | January 18, 2007
The timing is off -- way off. But Sunshine Anderson feels it's better late than never. After nearly six years of silence, the R&B singer has finally released her sophomore effort, Sunshine After Midnight. The CD belatedly follows her hit 2001 debut, Your Woman. Spurred by the sassy, strutting crossover smash "Heard It All Before," that album entered the Top 10 on Billboard's pop charts five Aprils ago, eventually going gold. Anderson's lyrical directness and swaggering, slightly off-key approach drew comparisons to the original 'hood-rat diva, Mary J. Blige.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun Reporter | May 3, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Federal health officials proposed new label warnings for all antidepressants yesterday, a move aimed at protecting 18- to 24-year-olds who might be at increased risk of suicidal thinking and behavior during early months of treatment. The "black box" update would follow similar changes made to antidepressants' labels in 2005 that added a warning of increased suicide risks among children and adolescents but did not give specific ages.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2000
Tucked away in the schedule for one performance in the annual Columbia Festival of the Arts lie two brief lines in small white print: "Contains brief nudity and adult content. Not recommended for young children." While the issue of nudity is not new for the burgeoning festival, the advisory label signals officials' attempts to balance the family-oriented nature of the event with the desire to attract cutting-edge performances. "The reason there is an advisory label is not so much about the nudity," said Katherine Knowles, the festival's executive director.
NEWS
By Susan Brink and Susan Brink,Los Angeles Times | May 25, 2007
When coronary arteries get dangerously narrow, the solution -- increasingly -- is to prop open the walls with a device called a drug-eluting stent. Now, two new studies are adding fuel to a growing debate about whether these stents are being overused, with ill consequences for patients. The studies, both published in the May 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, included large groups of patients who were treated for narrowing in their coronary arteries with the stents, which are tiny drug-coated cylinders used to prop open blocked arteries.
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