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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | September 16, 2009
Officials at the Baltimore Lab School realized the old building at 2220 St. Paul St. had all the criteria they wanted: It looked like a castle. It sat squarely in a city neighborhood. Its $1.5 million purchase price proved as affordable as the rent they were paying on it. The private school, whose 130 students work to overcome learning disabilities, recently bought the old Goucher Hall, a landmark granite structure that was Goucher College's main academic structure before the school moved to Towson.
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NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | March 25, 2014
Doug and Gretchen Moran, owners of a home-based software company in California, said they can live wherever they want. And what they want are good schools for their children, Jack, 5, and Isabel, 8 - especially Jack, who they say is both a special-needs and a gifted student, reading far above his grade level but hampered by Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Last week, the family toured the private Baltimore Lab School in the Old Goucher neighborhood in south Charles Village during an open house.
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NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2002
When the Knights and Ladies Club at The Lab School meets each day, the children pack a lot of learning into an hour. The pupils in this academic club learn passwords to enter and leave the simulated castle in their classroom, dress in period costumes, play the roles of monks and work on calligraphy. They listen to the teacher read aloud from The Canterbury Tales, by Geoffrey Chaucer, and learn about Medieval England, the Battle of Hastings and William the Conqueror. More important, they learn to focus so they can decode words - break them into chunks to sound them out - for reading.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | September 16, 2009
Officials at the Baltimore Lab School realized the old building at 2220 St. Paul St. had all the criteria they wanted: It looked like a castle. It sat squarely in a city neighborhood. Its $1.5 million purchase price proved as affordable as the rent they were paying on it. The private school, whose 130 students work to overcome learning disabilities, recently bought the old Goucher Hall, a landmark granite structure that was Goucher College's main academic structure before the school moved to Towson.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2000
A NEW SCHOOL opens in Baltimore today - in a museum. The Lab School of Washington, a respected school for children with learning disabilities, opens its first branch in the Port Discovery "kid-powered" children's museum near the Inner Harbor. Eighteen kids, ages 7 to 10, are expected. It seems a perfect fit. The Lab School employs all the art forms to teach pupils with learning disabilities. Port Discovery is a "hands-on" museum chock-full of art that children can see, hear, feel, even taste and smell.
NEWS
February 3, 2002
Area schools and literacy programs seek volunteers to help children and adults improve reading skills, and to assist with related projects. Among them: The Lab School of Washington: Baltimore Campus, 35 Market Place, Baltimore, needs tutors who have Orton-Gillingham training to work with children ages 6 to 12 with learning disabilities. Tutors are needed weekdays from 8 a.m. to noon. Information: Colleen Kane, 410-727-5203. If your school or organization would like to be included in this listing, call Sundial at 410-783- 1800 and enter code 6130.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2002
Two Baltimore lawyers who advised the late Bea Gaddy launched a scholarship fund yesterday in her honor to help low-income minority children with learning disabilities. Brothers Phillip and Bryan Potts are starting the Bea Gaddy Scholarship Fund at the Lab School of Washington, a school for students with learning disabilities that opened a Baltimore branch two years ago. The lawyers' father, Bernard Potts, was one of Gaddy's longtime mentors as she built a charitable enterprise to serve the homeless and hungry.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 24, 2003
An influential planning consultant hired to assist the Baltimore Lab School in its attempt to lease the old Northern District police station is striving to warm up interest in a plan that has drawn public censure throughout Hampden. The small special-education school has retained Alfred W. Barry III to meet with several neighborhood associations and make the case that the school is a good catch for the blue-collar community. Hampden residents have expressed skepticism about the school's bid and said it did not meet their criteria for the building, which community leaders hope to convert into a retail center with a variety of shops and offices.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2003
The developer recycling Hampden's vacant Northern District police building is considering leasing part of the historic structure to a special education school -- an idea that is receiving a cool reception from community activists. Stanley Keyser, a lead developer in a deal approved in 2000 by the city and community, said yesterday that his original proposal for a $3.5 million "Heritage Savings Centre" with a bank, offices and a restaurant has been overtaken by events. The bank he expected to be the lead tenant, Heritage Savings, has folded, he said.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2002
Jonathan Mooney knows what it's like to be labeled stupid, lazy and crazy. He was told as a teen-ager that he would end up "flipping burgers" at a fast-food restaurant. Now, at age 25, Mooney is an author who speaks about the problems he faced growing up with dyslexia. His message to more than 200 parents and educators this week at the St. James Academy in Monkton could not have been more clear: Children with learning disabilities are not "broken" and do not need to be "fixed." "It's an issue of diversity," Mooney told the heads of private schools and members of the Parents Council of Greater Baltimore Inc. "Schools need to lower their barriers for cognitive diversity in schools.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | January 26, 2004
Now that the sanctuary of Lovely Lane United Methodist Church has been restored, the historic building just north of it will be renovated next. Goucher Hall, the first building on the original Goucher College campus, will be the new home of Baltimore Lab, a division of the Lab School of Washington. Investor Neil Katz heads a group that acquired the gray granite landmark at 2220 St. Paul St. last year and has agreed to lease it to the school, which educates students with learning disabilities such as dyslexia.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 24, 2003
An influential planning consultant hired to assist the Baltimore Lab School in its attempt to lease the old Northern District police station is striving to warm up interest in a plan that has drawn public censure throughout Hampden. The small special-education school has retained Alfred W. Barry III to meet with several neighborhood associations and make the case that the school is a good catch for the blue-collar community. Hampden residents have expressed skepticism about the school's bid and said it did not meet their criteria for the building, which community leaders hope to convert into a retail center with a variety of shops and offices.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2003
The developer recycling Hampden's vacant Northern District police building is considering leasing part of the historic structure to a special education school -- an idea that is receiving a cool reception from community activists. Stanley Keyser, a lead developer in a deal approved in 2000 by the city and community, said yesterday that his original proposal for a $3.5 million "Heritage Savings Centre" with a bank, offices and a restaurant has been overtaken by events. The bank he expected to be the lead tenant, Heritage Savings, has folded, he said.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2002
Two Baltimore lawyers who advised the late Bea Gaddy launched a scholarship fund yesterday in her honor to help low-income minority children with learning disabilities. Brothers Phillip and Bryan Potts are starting the Bea Gaddy Scholarship Fund at the Lab School of Washington, a school for students with learning disabilities that opened a Baltimore branch two years ago. The lawyers' father, Bernard Potts, was one of Gaddy's longtime mentors as she built a charitable enterprise to serve the homeless and hungry.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2002
Jonathan Mooney knows what it's like to be labeled stupid, lazy and crazy. He was told as a teen-ager that he would end up "flipping burgers" at a fast-food restaurant. Now, at age 25, Mooney is an author who speaks about the problems he faced growing up with dyslexia. His message to more than 200 parents and educators this week at the St. James Academy in Monkton could not have been more clear: Children with learning disabilities are not "broken" and do not need to be "fixed." "It's an issue of diversity," Mooney told the heads of private schools and members of the Parents Council of Greater Baltimore Inc. "Schools need to lower their barriers for cognitive diversity in schools.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2002
When the Knights and Ladies Club at The Lab School meets each day, the children pack a lot of learning into an hour. The pupils in this academic club learn passwords to enter and leave the simulated castle in their classroom, dress in period costumes, play the roles of monks and work on calligraphy. They listen to the teacher read aloud from The Canterbury Tales, by Geoffrey Chaucer, and learn about Medieval England, the Battle of Hastings and William the Conqueror. More important, they learn to focus so they can decode words - break them into chunks to sound them out - for reading.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2001
IN THE HALLS of Congress, countervailing forces are at work. Lawmakers are poised to approve the centerpiece of President Bush's education agenda: yearly reading and math testing in grades three through eight. Next on the agenda, though, is legislation that would give parents the right to pull their kids out of the testing. The National Education Association, meeting last week in Los Angeles, voted to put its considerable influence behind that legislation, sending a chilling message to state education departments and the testing industry.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | May 27, 1998
RACE IN AMERICA today, says James D. Tschechtelin, "is a taboo topic, like sex in the Victorian era. Now we talk about sex all the time and repress talk about race."Tschechtelin, president of Baltimore City Community College, is on a campaign to encourage a dialogue on race -- one that, for a change, isn't sparked by an "incident." He said BCCC has taken a number of steps to raise the issue to the level of civil dialogue.Tschechtelin, 55, knows a little about the topic, and that's his point: You can be white and address racial issues.
NEWS
February 3, 2002
Area schools and literacy programs seek volunteers to help children and adults improve reading skills, and to assist with related projects. Among them: The Lab School of Washington: Baltimore Campus, 35 Market Place, Baltimore, needs tutors who have Orton-Gillingham training to work with children ages 6 to 12 with learning disabilities. Tutors are needed weekdays from 8 a.m. to noon. Information: Colleen Kane, 410-727-5203. If your school or organization would like to be included in this listing, call Sundial at 410-783- 1800 and enter code 6130.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2001
IN THE HALLS of Congress, countervailing forces are at work. Lawmakers are poised to approve the centerpiece of President Bush's education agenda: yearly reading and math testing in grades three through eight. Next on the agenda, though, is legislation that would give parents the right to pull their kids out of the testing. The National Education Association, meeting last week in Los Angeles, voted to put its considerable influence behind that legislation, sending a chilling message to state education departments and the testing industry.
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