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La Traviata

NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 27, 2003
To bring off Giuseppe Verdi's perennial favorite, La Traviata, you need three excellent soprano voices. That's the easy part. The hard part is that they all must emanate from the same throat. For Violetta Valery - the flighty Parisian courtesan who falls for handsome, aristocratic Alfredo Germont, only to let him go at his father's request - is no ordinary role. Violetta the Act I party girl must be nimble and lyrical enough to sprint through the fearsome coloratura passages of Sempre libera, her hyperactive ode to free love.
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NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 27, 2003
To bring off Giuseppe Verdi's perennial favorite, La Traviata, you need three excellent soprano voices. That's the easy part. The hard part is that they all must emanate from the same throat. For Violetta Valery - the flighty Parisian courtesan who falls for handsome, aristocratic Alfredo Germont, only to let him go at his father's request - is no ordinary role. Violetta the Act I party girl must be nimble and lyrical enough to sprint through the fearsome coloratura passages of "Sempre libera," her hyperactive ode to free love.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 13, 2003
Annapolis Opera conductor and artistic director Ronald J. Gretz and his cast of singers are in the final week of rehearsal of Verdi's La Traviata. The second fully staged opera of this 30th anniversary season is to be presented March 21 and 23 at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts. Often described as the world's most popular opera because of its compelling love story and its relatively small cast and orchestra size requirements, La Traviata is also the most contemporary Verdi opera. Having premiered six years after the death at age 22 of Marie Duplessis, the woman that Alexandre Dumas loved and described in his La Dame Aux Camelias, Verdi's opera was criticized when it opened in Venice in 1853 for being too modern.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith | January 22, 2003
One-fourth of Wagner's Ring Cycle, an operatic treatment of Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire, and the original 1853 version of Verdi's La Traviata are among the attractions of Washington Opera's 2003-2004 season. Artistic director Placido Domingo spent part of his 62nd birthday yesterday holding a news conference to announce the lineup and discuss the company's new temporary home at DAR Constitution Hall. That hall is currently being refurbished and reconfigured to accommodate Washington Opera productions for a year, starting next month with Aida and continuing with Don Giovanni and Fidelio this season, while the Kennedy Center Opera House is being renovated.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 22, 2002
Annapolis Opera's 2002-2003 season will feature two popular favorites, Die Fledermaus, Johann Strauss' operetta celebrating 19th-century Viennese life, and Verdi's La Traviata, the incomparable love story of the ravishing Violetta Valery and romantic Alfredo Germont. A new event next month, "Opera on the Half Shell," will open this 30th anniversary season, which also includes two fund-raisers, "Pasta, Puccini, Verdi and Friends" and the annual Opera Gala and Auction. The season also will include a holiday candlelight "Mozart, Beethoven and Others" concert, and the annual Vocal Competition in February.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 2, 2000
Opera buffs enjoyed a dinner of fettuccine followed by spumoni topped with even more delicious fare in arias by Puccini and Verdi at the Annapolis Opera's opera suppers Friday and Sunday. Last year, in an effort to make opera accessible and enjoyable to a wider audience, Annapolis Opera President Anna Marie Darlington-Gilmour held one sold-out opera supper, which has grown to two sold-out events at the Naval Academy Officers' Club. Not only did the president succeed in making opera fun, this year she also raised $8,000, enough to pay off the remaining "Tosca" debts after ticket sales covered only 40 percent of production costs.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2000
When the Baltimore Opera Company opens its new season this fall, it will mark a half century of music. "We are delighted to bring to our city this spectacular season for our 50th anniversary and know that both seasoned opera-lovers and newcomers will love what they see and hear," says Michael Harrison, the general director of the opera company. As usual, the season will have a definite international flair reflected in the casts, directors and conductors. The new season features five grand opera productions in the Lyric Opera House.
NEWS
November 25, 1999
To our readers:On Nov. 15, The Sun published a review of the Baltimore Opera Company's performance of "La Traviata."After the review appeared, a reader wrote the newspaper to point out striking similarities between a passage in the review and one about a recording of "La Traviata" from a commonly used musical reference book, "The Metropolitan Opera Guide to Recorded Opera," published in 1993.The critic who wrote The Sun's review, when asked about the similarity, acknowledged having committed plagiarism.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | November 11, 1999
'La Traviata'Enter the glittering world of the Paris demimonde and listen to the story of the consumptive Violetta, a courtesan who gives up the man she truly loves for the sake of his family, when the Baltimore Opera Company presents Verdi's "La Traviata" Saturday through Nov. 21 at the Lyric Opera House, 140 W. Mount Royal Ave. Performances are 8:15 p.m. Saturday and Nov. 19; 3 p.m. Sunday and Nov. 21; 7:30 p.m. Wednesday and next Thursday. Tickets are $25-$112. Call 410-727-6000.BSO spotlights Russian artistsRussian natives Dmitri Kitaenko (guest conductor, pictured)
FEATURES
By Pierre Ruhe and Pierre Ruhe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 15, 1997
Asterisks in the program booklet best explained the Washington Opera's new production of Verdi's "La Traviata." An asterisk beside a name denotes a debut with the company. All the major players -- the romantic leads on stage, the conductor and the production team -- were making debuts for its opening, Thursday night.Ensemble counts for much in opera. Good timing relies on familiarity. So even a small company can succeed handsomely when all the parts flow smoothly. For this "Traviata," the debutants knew their own roles but seemed oblivious to one another.
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