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La Traviata

ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2005
THEATER PRINCE'S TOUCH Harold Prince, who won a 1980 Tony Award for his direction of the Andrew Lloyd Webber-Tim Rice musical Evita, has always said one of the musical's central themes is manipulation by the media. Returning to supervise the revival that opens at the Hippodrome on Tuesday, Prince points out that the theme is even more relevant today, considering "how much more media there is now than when we [first] did that show." The account of the rise and fall of the late Argentine first lady Eva Peron is co-directed by Prince and Larry Fuller (who is also re-creating his original choreography)
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FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 22, 2004
Two sopranos dying of consumption, another prone to sleepwalking, and a baritone facing capital punishment by lethal injection - all part of the action planned for the Baltimore Opera Company's 2005-2006 season. Particularly noteworthy is the local premiere of Jake Heggie's Dead Man Walking, which has enjoyed remarkable success with the public and the press since it was introduced by the San Francisco Opera in 2000. Baltimore Opera joined six other companies to fund the compact, visually potent co-production that will be seen at the Lyric Opera House in March 2006.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 15, 2003
A heady lineup of musical happenings in Philadelphia and New York last weekend exerted an irresistible pull and offered a welcome reminder of the good old-fashioned attribute known as star quality. With Renee Fleming, you've got that quality in abundance, as demonstrated by her first appearance as Violetta in Verdi's La traviata at the Metropolitan Opera, probably the most talked about event so far this season in New York. She was to have sung the role there a few years ago but changed her mind, feeling unready.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 27, 2003
To bring off Giuseppe Verdi's perennial favorite, La Traviata, you need three excellent soprano voices. That's the easy part. The hard part is that they all must emanate from the same throat. For Violetta Valery - the flighty Parisian courtesan who falls for handsome, aristocratic Alfredo Germont, only to let him go at his father's request - is no ordinary role. Violetta the Act I party girl must be nimble and lyrical enough to sprint through the fearsome coloratura passages of Sempre libera, her hyperactive ode to free love.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 27, 2003
To bring off Giuseppe Verdi's perennial favorite, La Traviata, you need three excellent soprano voices. That's the easy part. The hard part is that they all must emanate from the same throat. For Violetta Valery - the flighty Parisian courtesan who falls for handsome, aristocratic Alfredo Germont, only to let him go at his father's request - is no ordinary role. Violetta the Act I party girl must be nimble and lyrical enough to sprint through the fearsome coloratura passages of "Sempre libera," her hyperactive ode to free love.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 13, 2003
Annapolis Opera conductor and artistic director Ronald J. Gretz and his cast of singers are in the final week of rehearsal of Verdi's La Traviata. The second fully staged opera of this 30th anniversary season is to be presented March 21 and 23 at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts. Often described as the world's most popular opera because of its compelling love story and its relatively small cast and orchestra size requirements, La Traviata is also the most contemporary Verdi opera. Having premiered six years after the death at age 22 of Marie Duplessis, the woman that Alexandre Dumas loved and described in his La Dame Aux Camelias, Verdi's opera was criticized when it opened in Venice in 1853 for being too modern.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith | January 22, 2003
One-fourth of Wagner's Ring Cycle, an operatic treatment of Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire, and the original 1853 version of Verdi's La Traviata are among the attractions of Washington Opera's 2003-2004 season. Artistic director Placido Domingo spent part of his 62nd birthday yesterday holding a news conference to announce the lineup and discuss the company's new temporary home at DAR Constitution Hall. That hall is currently being refurbished and reconfigured to accommodate Washington Opera productions for a year, starting next month with Aida and continuing with Don Giovanni and Fidelio this season, while the Kennedy Center Opera House is being renovated.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 22, 2002
Annapolis Opera's 2002-2003 season will feature two popular favorites, Die Fledermaus, Johann Strauss' operetta celebrating 19th-century Viennese life, and Verdi's La Traviata, the incomparable love story of the ravishing Violetta Valery and romantic Alfredo Germont. A new event next month, "Opera on the Half Shell," will open this 30th anniversary season, which also includes two fund-raisers, "Pasta, Puccini, Verdi and Friends" and the annual Opera Gala and Auction. The season also will include a holiday candlelight "Mozart, Beethoven and Others" concert, and the annual Vocal Competition in February.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 2, 2000
Opera buffs enjoyed a dinner of fettuccine followed by spumoni topped with even more delicious fare in arias by Puccini and Verdi at the Annapolis Opera's opera suppers Friday and Sunday. Last year, in an effort to make opera accessible and enjoyable to a wider audience, Annapolis Opera President Anna Marie Darlington-Gilmour held one sold-out opera supper, which has grown to two sold-out events at the Naval Academy Officers' Club. Not only did the president succeed in making opera fun, this year she also raised $8,000, enough to pay off the remaining "Tosca" debts after ticket sales covered only 40 percent of production costs.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2000
When the Baltimore Opera Company opens its new season this fall, it will mark a half century of music. "We are delighted to bring to our city this spectacular season for our 50th anniversary and know that both seasoned opera-lovers and newcomers will love what they see and hear," says Michael Harrison, the general director of the opera company. As usual, the season will have a definite international flair reflected in the casts, directors and conductors. The new season features five grand opera productions in the Lyric Opera House.
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