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By Richard Gorelick, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2010
La Scala in Little Italy was having a grand night when we visited on a recent Wednesday. Upstairs, the dining rooms were full of diners who looked to be evenly divided between business and family groups, first-timers and regulars. Downstairs, the bar was overflowing, and a woman reading a novel offered to make room for us. But the weather was so nice, it was even nicer to take a cocktail out to La Scala's small front porch. La Scala looks and feels better since it was expanded two years ago — the added indoor bocce court works maybe only as a conversation starter, but the natural light and the illusion at least of more elbow room are definite assets.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
Carlo Maria Giulini, the elegant and eloquent Italian conductor, was born on this date 100 years ago (he died in 2005). The centenary is a good reason to take a moment and recall his uncommon artistry. This brief audio clip -- Prelude to Act 3 of Verdi's "La Traviata," recorded live at La Scala in 1956 -- easily reveals the Giulini touch. The conductor makes every phrase speak, and the way he stretches out the very last notes communicates with a most extraordinary pathos. You just don't hear music-making like this everyday.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 5, 2005
In case you haven't heard, one of today's greatest conductors has been booted out of one of history's greatest opera houses in one of the juiciest scandals to hit the classical music biz in ages. Bowing to the inevitable, Riccardo Muti resigned Saturday as principal conductor (and untitled ruler) of La Scala in Milan - an announcement that hit news desks heavily preoccupied with events in another Italian city. The action follows charges and countercharges, at least one firing (the superintendent of the opera house, perceived as a Muti foe)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2014
The news overnight that Claudio Abbado has died is deeply affecting. The Italian conductor was responsible for some of the most sublime music-making of our time. We are fortunate that so much of it was recorded and filmed, a treasury of inspiration that will be much valued as long as people care about the art form. Mr. Abbado, who held top posts with La Scala, the Berlin Philharmonic, the London Symphony and several others, died "serenely" at the age of 80 in his home in Bologna, according to news reports.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | December 18, 2008
Centuries ago, when opera was developed, there were frequently debates about which element was more important, the music or the text. Today, the most crucial question is: Do you want butter with your popcorn? Thanks to the Metropolitan Opera, which introduced the concept of digitally transmitted performances to movie theaters a couple years ago, people all over the country and abroad are heading to the local cineplex to get their fix of Verdi, Puccini and Wagner. Locally, big movie theaters in Abingdon and Columbia signed on quickly to the Met's live simulcasts with subtitles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | April 11, 1996
Has your favorite Little Italy ristorante gotten too big, too sophisticated and too impersonal for you? Try La Scala instead, a restaurant with doll house proportions and good old-fashioned home cooking.It doesn't look like a traditional middle-class Italian restaurant any more than its predecessor, Raphael's, did. The colors are soft peach and deep green; and it's filled with fat little cherubs -- both statues and prints on the wall. There may be a few more tables this time round in the tiny dining room; I can't be sure.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 19, 2006
The most talked-about tenor in the world at the moment is Roberto Alagna, who famously - infamously? - stormed off the stage of Milan's La Scala, the most prestigious Italian opera house, after his entrance aria in Verdi's Aida was coarsely booed last week. The second most talked-about tenor is Antonello Palombi, who was pushed onstage, still in his street clothes, to pick up where Alagna left off. That didn't stop the catcalls right away - "Shame" (possibly aimed at the booers) and "buffoon" (presumably targeting Alagna)
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | December 24, 2000
Sometimes moving to larger quarters is the kiss of death for a restaurant. Not so for La Scala, which seems to be doing very well in its new location on Eastern Avenue, still in Little Italy. (It moved from rented space on High Street.) The restaurant, which is small compared with some of the bigger names in Little Italy, has a bar and a dozen or so tables downstairs. There's another dining room upstairs. The rooms have a vaguely Mediterranean air, with sunny, sponge-painted walls, exposed brick, charming sconces and rustic murals.
NEWS
April 21, 2007
CARLO MARIA BADINI, 81 Headed La Scala Carlo Maria Badini, a former superintendent of Milan's La Scala who scandalized opera buffs by introducing commercial activities to save the storied theater from financial difficulties, died in his native Bologna on Thursday, La Scala said in a statement. The current superintendent, Stephane Lissner, led a minute of silence at the theater before a Thursday evening performance of Francesco Cilea's Adriana Lecouvreur. In the statement, La Scala praised Mr. Badini's "human and pragmatic vein" and said it "remembers with affection the man who guided it with honesty and rigor for 13 years."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
Carlo Maria Giulini, the elegant and eloquent Italian conductor, was born on this date 100 years ago (he died in 2005). The centenary is a good reason to take a moment and recall his uncommon artistry. This brief audio clip -- Prelude to Act 3 of Verdi's "La Traviata," recorded live at La Scala in 1956 -- easily reveals the Giulini touch. The conductor makes every phrase speak, and the way he stretches out the very last notes communicates with a most extraordinary pathos. You just don't hear music-making like this everyday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
Biographical sources differ on when Maria Callas was born -- one book covers all bases by listing her birth date as "Dec. 2, 3 or 4, 1923" -- but every reputable source agrees that this soprano, who would have turned 90 this week, ranks among the best of the best. (Google is going with Dec. 2, which explains its nice graphic today .) Callas worship is a cliche by now (Terrence McNally built a whole play, "The Lisbon Traviata," around it), but for those of us fully under the spell of "La Divina," there's nothing cheap or silly about it. We find in Callas an incredibly satisfying artistry that gets to the heart and soul of opera -- of music, period.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2011
Check out the new Dine Downtown video, produced by the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore. The video features chefs and restaurateurs talking about how great it is to serve food to people in Downtown Baltimore. Look for Cindy Wolf (Charleston), Tony Foreman (Pazo), Jerry Pelligrino (Corks), Volker Stewart (Brewer's Art), Thomas Dunkin (B&O Brasserie), Nino Germano (La Scala) and Ezra Tilaye (Creme).      
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2010
La Scala in Little Italy was having a grand night when we visited on a recent Wednesday. Upstairs, the dining rooms were full of diners who looked to be evenly divided between business and family groups, first-timers and regulars. Downstairs, the bar was overflowing, and a woman reading a novel offered to make room for us. But the weather was so nice, it was even nicer to take a cocktail out to La Scala's small front porch. La Scala looks and feels better since it was expanded two years ago — the added indoor bocce court works maybe only as a conversation starter, but the natural light and the illusion at least of more elbow room are definite assets.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | December 18, 2008
Centuries ago, when opera was developed, there were frequently debates about which element was more important, the music or the text. Today, the most crucial question is: Do you want butter with your popcorn? Thanks to the Metropolitan Opera, which introduced the concept of digitally transmitted performances to movie theaters a couple years ago, people all over the country and abroad are heading to the local cineplex to get their fix of Verdi, Puccini and Wagner. Locally, big movie theaters in Abingdon and Columbia signed on quickly to the Met's live simulcasts with subtitles.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | March 28, 2008
A film portrait of Billie Holiday, including most of the movie and TV footage of the singer known to exist, will be shown Wednesday at An die Musik Live, 409 N. Charles St. The clips date from 1935 through 1957 and include a jam session with Duke Ellington. There is also an audio interview with a young Mike Wallace and a performance of the legendary "Strange Fruit." Showtime is 7 p.m., and tickets are $8. Information: 410-385-2638 or andiemusik live.com. Self-help onscreen You Can Heal Your Life: The Movie, a film centering on the life and philosophy of self-help advocate Louise L. Hay, will be shown at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow and 7 p.m. Sunday at Your Prescription for Health's Learning Center, 10210 S. Dolfield Blvd.
FEATURES
By Jennifer Choi and Jennifer Choi,Sun reporter | January 25, 2008
Curt Heavey of art-rock band Boister will play guitar and banjo music to accompany a showing of rarely screened shorts by Buster Keaton, 7:30 p.m. tomorrow at the Creative Alliance at the Patterson, 3134 Eastern Ave. The shorts include The Scarecrow, which involves madcap chases, The Paleface, which deals with evil oil barons and American Indians, and One Week, a comedy about newlyweds and a do-it-yourself home project. Tickets are $8-$12. Information: 410-276-1651 or go to creativealliance.
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | July 1, 2006
The first thought in Nino Germano's mind when he woke up yesterday was not the homemade pasta or savory sauces he would cook up in his Little Italy restaurant. It was soccer. "First thing I did, I put on my lucky jersey," Germano said, flaunting the blue shirt that he's worn for all of Italy's World Cup soccer matches. "I'm not washing it until it's over." Native Italians and soccer fanatics crowded around the TV in Germano's La Scala restaurant to bite their nails, jump out of their chairs and thump each other on the back as the Italian team trounced Ukraine and advanced to the World Cup semifinals.
NEWS
February 6, 1996
Gianandrea Gavazzeni, 86, composer, musician and a former artistic director of Milan's La Scala opera house, died yesterday at his home in northern Italy, his family said.Mr. Gavazzeni, who had been ill for several months, began his career as a pianist and composer and wrote copiously for 20 years. He began working with La Scala in 1948 and served as its artistic director from 1966-1968.He conducted all the greats in theaters throughout Italy and wrote guides to the operas of Mozart, Wagner and others.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | January 18, 2008
Celebrate what would have been Edgar Allan Poe's 199th birthday with a free program of three short films based on his stories, set for 3 p.m. tomorrow at the Enoch Pratt Free Library's Southeast Anchor branch, 3601 Eastern Ave. The three shorts, culled from the Pratt's vast 16 mm film archives, are The Tell-Tale Heart, The Masque of the Red Death and The Haunted Palace. Information: 410-396- 1580 or prattlibrary.org/calendar. Hitchcock retrospective The Charles' Alfred Hitchcock retrospective continues this weekend with 1940's Rebecca, the great director's first American film and the only one to win a Best Picture Oscar.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | November 20, 2007
It's looking like a trend. A year after the Metropolitan Opera shook things up by beaming live, high-def performances to movie theaters throughout this country and beyond, several famed Italian opera houses will take advantage of the same technology to enter the U.S. market this season. A production from last season of Verdi's Aida from Milan's La Scala will launch this new venture, which uses live performances on tape, rather than simulcasts. The cast will include Roberto Alagna as Radames - this is apparently the one complete performance he gave of the role at La Scala last year, a couple of nights before he was booed and, famously, walked out. Violeta Urmana sings the title role, and Riccardo Chailly conducts.
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