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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN STAFF | November 23, 2000
Olney Theatre Center concludes its 2000 season with the hit 1960s musical, "Man of La Mancha," currently in previews and opening Sunday. Adapted from Cervantes' classic, "Don Quixote," with a book by Dale Wasserman, music by Mitch Leigh and lyrics by Joe Darion, the musical uses a play-within-a-play format to tell the story of both Cervantes and his fictitious hero, Quixote, the undaunted knight who tilted at windmills. Olney's production is directed by John Going and stars Broadway veterans Richard White (the voice of Gaston in Disney's animated "Beauty and the Beast")
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By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2009
Dale Wasserman's musical retelling of Cervantes' Don Quixote opened on Broadway in 1965 as Man of La Mancha, becoming one of the first dramatic musicals, and followed two decades later by Phantom of the Opera and Les Miserables, among others. Man of La Mancha ran for 2,328 performances and won five Tony Awards, including best musical and best actor for Richard Kiley. Running more than 300 performances, the most recent of repeated Broadway revivals starred Brian Stokes Mitchell as Quixote in 2002.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck | April 25, 1995
Two-time Tony Award winner John Cullum will star as Don Quixote in the touring production of "Man of La Mancha" coming to the Lyric Opera House from May 23 to June 4. Though he is currently best known as bartender Holling Vincoeur on CBS' "Northern Exposure," Cullum has a long and distinguished stage career that includes playing Quixote in the original Broadway production of "La Mancha."He won Tony Awards in 1975 for "Shenandoah" and in 1978 for "On the Twentieth Century." His most recent Broadway credit was Andrew Lloyd Webber's "Aspects of Love."
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By Thomas McGonigle and Thomas McGonigle,Special to the Sun | July 15, 2007
Crossing the Sierra de Gredos By Peter Handke Farrar, Straus and Giroux / 480 pages / $30 Peter Handke is controversial. There is no getting around this, and sadly there is a danger that it may distract attention from the fact that Crossing the Sierra de Gredos is one of the most emotionally rewarding and intellectually demanding novels of the year. Handke is controversial but in a way that is different from that of his countryman, Gunter Grass, who, as an outspokenly leftist progressive novelist, has only recently revealed in his memoir Peeling the Onion that he served in the Waffen-SS during World War II. No, with Handke it is more complicated than that.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | May 25, 1995
In a season when new musicals seem to be an impossible dream, musical theater lovers must content themselves with revisiting past glories, and the creditable revival of "Man of La Mancha" at the Lyric Opera House is a solid reminder of those glories.It's also an opportunity to see a mint-condition re-creation of this 1965 modern musical classic, with its majestic score by Mitch Leigh and Joe Darion, and its shrewdly crafted book, in which writer Dale Wasserman combined the story of Miguel de Cervantes, imprisoned during the Inquisition, with that of the cockeyed idealistic hero of his masterpiece, "Don Quixote."
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | May 21, 1995
You might say Michael Dansicker is a conductor who lights a fire under his musicians.At least that's what you'd say if you caught his performance in the little-known 1992 film comedy gem "Brain Donors." In that loose remake of the Marx Brothers' "A Night at the Opera," Dansicker is conducting "Swan Lake" when his baton is suddenly set on fire.The Baltimore-born conductor wasn't hired to act in the movie, merely to conduct and arrange the dance music. But the movie's star, John Turturro, suggested during filming that it might be funny if they lighted a match to the baton.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 28, 2003
The past few years have given us a handful of wonderful "making-of" documentaries, including Paul Seydor's The Wild Bunch: An Album in Montage and Richard Rush's The Sinister Saga of Making The Stunt Man. And now for something completely different (as Monty Python used to say), there's a vivid "un-making of" documentary, Lost in La Mancha, starring Terry Gilliam - the American-born Monty Python member beloved for his collage-like animations and his own out-there movies like Brazil. This engaging and enraging movie chronicles Gilliam's doomed attempt to film a Cervantes-inspired script called The Man Who Killed Don Quixote.
NEWS
March 6, 1999
Richard Kiley, 76, a strong-voice baritone who was Broadway's original "Man of La Mancha" and performed dozens of other dramatic and musical roles in movies and television since the 1950s, died yesterday in Warwick, N.Y. Mr. Kiley played Don Quixote in the 1965 musical "Man of La Mancha" and sang its hit, "The Impossible Dream." The show ran more than five years on Broadway and toured the world. He also played the role in 1972 and 1977.Pub Date: 3/06/99
NEWS
November 25, 1991
The comptroller of Garrett County Community College has been arrested on felony theft charges after more than $3,600 in sales from a college theater production last spring was discovered missing.The comptroller, John F. Culp, submitted his resignation to the college last week. He could not be reached for comment yesterday. Mr. Culp was arrested by the Garrett County Sheriff's office Tuesday and released on his own recognizance.A financial audit earlier this month could not account for $3,651 in receipts from GCC's spring production of "The Man of La Mancha," which the drama department forwarded for deposit butwas never sent to the bank, the auditors said.
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By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Sun Staff Writer | August 10, 1994
Producer Gary Wheeler promises that the papier-mache figures he's painting will look like rocks by Friday night when his Actors Company Theatre takes to the stage at North County High School to perform the first of four benefit performances of the musical "Man of La Mancha."The Glen Burnie-based amateur theater company was formed in June 1993 when Mr. Wheeler and two longtime friends, Wayne Shipley and John Strawbridge, decided to combine their talents and interests in local theater.Mr. Shipley, who is English chairman at North County, has directed some shows.
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By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,Special to The Sun | March 30, 2007
The Naval Academy's Distinguished Artists Series ushered in spring with the ballet Don Quixote, performed by the Moscow Festival Ballet dance company at the academy's Alumni Hall. The 40-member Moscow Festival Ballet was founded in 1989 by Bolshoi Ballet principal dancer Sergei Radchenko, who wanted to form a troupe that featured classical elements of the Bolshoi and Kirov companies and would stage new productions of classics like Don Quixote as well as 20th-century ballets such as Romeo and Juliet and Cinderella.
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By ROB KASPER | May 24, 2006
The midweek suppers and our house were leaning toward the ho-hum. So in an attempt to put a little spice in our weekday meals, I made pork chops La Mancha. La Mancha is in the center of Spain and is perhaps best known as the land of Don Quixote. Don Quixote is the fictional 17th-century knight who livened up his life by riding around the Spanish countryside on horseback, righting wrongs and attacking windmills. It made for a good novel, if not a great career path. I found a pork-chop recipe that looked promising in a new cookbook about this region of Spain, Cooking From the Heart of Spain, by Janet Mendel (Morrow Cookbooks, 2006)
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BY MICHAEL HILL and BY MICHAEL HILL,SUN REPORTER | October 23, 2005
In a certain village in La Mancha, which I do not wish to name, there lived long ago a gentleman . . . It has been four centuries since Miguel de Cervantes wrote those words. And, unlike most other words written that long ago, we are still reading them. Don Quixote celebrates its 400th birthday in 2005, which has made it the subject of celebrations, seminars, exhibits and commemorations throughout the year. The George Peabody Library in Mount Vernon Square is displaying its collection of Don Quixote editions through Jan. 15. The exhibit, Celebrating 400 Years of Don Quixote de la Mancha, traces "the publication history of a work that has been translated more frequently than any other work except the Bible."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 28, 2003
The past few years have given us a handful of wonderful "making-of" documentaries, including Paul Seydor's The Wild Bunch: An Album in Montage and Richard Rush's The Sinister Saga of Making The Stunt Man. And now for something completely different (as Monty Python used to say), there's a vivid "un-making of" documentary, Lost in La Mancha, starring Terry Gilliam - the American-born Monty Python member beloved for his collage-like animations and his own out-there movies like Brazil. This engaging and enraging movie chronicles Gilliam's doomed attempt to film a Cervantes-inspired script called The Man Who Killed Don Quixote.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 25, 2002
Man of La Mancha has returned to Broadway repeatedly since its 1965 debut. And it has always hewed to the original design and staging. Until now. When the curtain rises on the Broadway-bound production at Washington's National Theatre, it reveals a new look and a cast of actors who bring fresh interpretations to their roles. Although there's some fine-tuning yet to be done, all indications suggest that this retelling of the beloved Don Quixote musical - with a powerhouse company headed by Brian Stokes Mitchell and Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio - will be warmly welcomed when it opens in New York Dec. 5. British director Jonathan Kent has not attempted a wholesale re-envisioning.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 23, 2002
Tony Award-winning actor Brian Stokes Mitchell performs two rituals whenever he begins a play in a new theater. He burns sage throughout the building to drive out evil spirits. And before the first performance, he gathers the cast on stage and shares the history of the theater. Observing rituals reinforces the actor's belief that his life has followed definite patterns. These patterns go all the way back to his birth, which happened to fall on Halloween, a holiday he believes is an ideal birthday for an actor.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 23, 2002
Tony Award-winning actor Brian Stokes Mitchell performs two rituals whenever he begins a play in a new theater. He burns sage throughout the building to drive out evil spirits. And before the first performance, he gathers the cast on stage and shares the history of the theater. Observing rituals reinforces the actor's belief that his life has followed definite patterns. These patterns go all the way back to his birth, which happened to fall on Halloween, a holiday he believes is an ideal birthday for an actor.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | February 13, 1992
Washington -- To deluded Don Quixote, all that glitters is truly gold. But the Broadway-bound revival of "Man of La Mancha," now at the National Theatre, has a glitter deficit.For this musical rendition of Cervantes' classic to succeed, the audience must share Quixote's sparkling vision. However, despite an ennobling performance by Raul Julia in the title role, the overall production is lackluster. And for a show whose basic theme is idealism, lackluster is a serious offense.The casting of the leading lady is an ideal example.
NEWS
September 23, 2002
William Rosenberg, 86, the food franchising pioneer who founded the Dunkin' Donuts chain and saw it spread from coast to coast and into 37 countries, died Friday of bladder cancer at his home in Mashpee, Mass., on Cape Cod. After World War II, Mr. Rosenberg had cashed in $1,500 in war bonds and borrowed an additional $1,000 to start a business serving coffee, pastries and sandwiches to factory workers. He opened his first coffee and doughnut shop, called the Open Kettle, in Quincy, Mass.
NEWS
June 25, 2001
Dennis H. Weaver, 67, master electrician Dennis H. Weaver, a retired master electrician and longtime Harford County resident, died Friday of cancer at his home in Street. He was 67. He started in electrical work in the Navy, and served as an aviation electrician from 1951 to 1954, during the Korean War. He was stationed in Norfolk, Va., for most of the time he was in the Navy. Mr. Weaver was among the first electricians to join what was a new Local 24 of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers in Baltimore about 40 years ago. He was employed by Howard P. Foley Co. in Baltimore for more than 30 years.
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