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By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | July 2, 1992
The Young Victorian Theatre Company is presenting Gilbert and Sullivan's "Princess Ida," an operetta with a feminist theme, July 9-11 and July 16-18 in Centennial Hall at Bryn Mawr School on West Melrose Avenue. All performances begin at 8:15 p.m. Tickets are $18.50 for general admission, $17 for seniors and patrons and $12 for children. For details, call (410) 323-3077.The company, now in its 22nd season, recently received endowment grants totaling $10,000. This year's annual operating budget is $60,000.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
A lot has happened, operatically, in Baltimore during the past few years. The city lost its proud Baltimore Opera Company after more than five decades, then gained a sort of second cousin in the form of Lyric Opera Baltimore. Opera Vivente folded its tent after more than a dozen years. Baltimore Opera Theatre came and went in what seemed like a flash. Amid these and other changes, Baltimore Concert Opera , founded by former Baltimore Opera singers, has managed to hang on and maintain a steady course.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2008
Fans of artful singing had a choice of two programs Sunday afternoon in Annapolis: the Arundel Vocal Arts Society's "Mass Appeal" holiday concert at Eastport United Methodist Church and the Annapolis Opera's "Bel Canto by Candlelight" an hour later at First Presbyterian Church. I enjoyed the best of both by hearing the major work on the AVAS program, Haydn's Lord Nelson Mass, before catching Rossini, Donizetti and Bellini arias sung by five gifted young soloists making their debut in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2008
Fans of artful singing had a choice of two programs Sunday afternoon in Annapolis: the Arundel Vocal Arts Society's "Mass Appeal" holiday concert at Eastport United Methodist Church and the Annapolis Opera's "Bel Canto by Candlelight" an hour later at First Presbyterian Church. I enjoyed the best of both by hearing the major work on the AVAS program, Haydn's Lord Nelson Mass, before catching Rossini, Donizetti and Bellini arias sung by five gifted young soloists making their debut in Annapolis.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith | November 11, 2004
Washington National Opera will celebrate its 50th anniversary season next year with six productions (down from eight this season) and an unusual triple bill of fully staged acts from different operas, each starring tenor Placido Domingo, the company's general director. The 2005-2006 lineup is packed with works new to the company's repertoire, including Mozart's La Clemenza di Tito (with Michael Schade and Tatiana Pavlovskaya), Verdi's I Vespri Siciliani (with Maria Guleghina and Franco Farina)
FEATURES
By Daniel Webster and Daniel Webster,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 23, 1992
Television has removed much of the risk of pleasing a Christmas audience. On tape, Mikhail Baryshnikov, forever young, dances on in "The Nutcracker." Snow falls annually on the Waltons and turkeys keep showing up at the Cratchits' house.Into the ever-circling Christmas legends comes a comic love story as PBS broadcasts the Metropolitan Opera's performance of not "Hansel and Gretel," but Donizetti's "L'Elisir d'Amore" (tonight at 8 on Channels 22 and 67). Nothing in this opera suggests Christmas -- unless it is to reaffirm the gift of love.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2004
Debut at Vagabond Baltimore Playwrights Festival veteran Kathleen Barber's latest entry, A Different Kind of Love, debuts tomorrow at the Vagabond Players. Barber's ninth festival play focuses on two sets of romances - one between college students and the other featuring their parents' generation and the unexpected discovery of love in midlife. Under Linda Chambers' direction, the younger lovers are played by Laurel Peyrot and Ian Bonds. The older generation, which becomes involved in a romantic triangle, is portrayed by Lynda McClary, Terry Hickey and Mark Steckbeck.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 4, 2006
Comic operas don't come more charming and tuneful than Donizetti's L'elisir d'amore. Behind the seemingly superficial surface of the plot's rustic setting is a genuine heart. As the silly games people play, seeking love or money or prestige, get a proper skewering, kernels of truth about human nature seep through the infectious score. Washington National Opera's production gets those truths across in almost entirely persuasive fashion, while providing some genuinely funny action and exceptional musical values.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 30, 2004
A ranch hand in chaps trying to do rope tricks. A monied country girl in an Annie Oakley outfit. A sergeant who looks like a General Custer wannabe. A snake oil salesman whose accoutrements include a Victrola for occasional musical backup. And a spirited dash of good old-fashioned do-si-do-ing. Sure sounds like an Italian opera to me. Actually, it's not such a stretch, when the opera is Donizetti's eternal charmer, L'elisir d'amore (The Elixir of Love). Early 19th-century Italian rusticity, the plot's original milieu, is hardly the only apt setting for a story about love, flirtation and hucksterism.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
A lot has happened, operatically, in Baltimore during the past few years. The city lost its proud Baltimore Opera Company after more than five decades, then gained a sort of second cousin in the form of Lyric Opera Baltimore. Opera Vivente folded its tent after more than a dozen years. Baltimore Opera Theatre came and went in what seemed like a flash. Amid these and other changes, Baltimore Concert Opera , founded by former Baltimore Opera singers, has managed to hang on and maintain a steady course.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 4, 2006
Comic operas don't come more charming and tuneful than Donizetti's L'elisir d'amore. Behind the seemingly superficial surface of the plot's rustic setting is a genuine heart. As the silly games people play, seeking love or money or prestige, get a proper skewering, kernels of truth about human nature seep through the infectious score. Washington National Opera's production gets those truths across in almost entirely persuasive fashion, while providing some genuinely funny action and exceptional musical values.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith | November 11, 2004
Washington National Opera will celebrate its 50th anniversary season next year with six productions (down from eight this season) and an unusual triple bill of fully staged acts from different operas, each starring tenor Placido Domingo, the company's general director. The 2005-2006 lineup is packed with works new to the company's repertoire, including Mozart's La Clemenza di Tito (with Michael Schade and Tatiana Pavlovskaya), Verdi's I Vespri Siciliani (with Maria Guleghina and Franco Farina)
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 30, 2004
A ranch hand in chaps trying to do rope tricks. A monied country girl in an Annie Oakley outfit. A sergeant who looks like a General Custer wannabe. A snake oil salesman whose accoutrements include a Victrola for occasional musical backup. And a spirited dash of good old-fashioned do-si-do-ing. Sure sounds like an Italian opera to me. Actually, it's not such a stretch, when the opera is Donizetti's eternal charmer, L'elisir d'amore (The Elixir of Love). Early 19th-century Italian rusticity, the plot's original milieu, is hardly the only apt setting for a story about love, flirtation and hucksterism.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2004
Debut at Vagabond Baltimore Playwrights Festival veteran Kathleen Barber's latest entry, A Different Kind of Love, debuts tomorrow at the Vagabond Players. Barber's ninth festival play focuses on two sets of romances - one between college students and the other featuring their parents' generation and the unexpected discovery of love in midlife. Under Linda Chambers' direction, the younger lovers are played by Laurel Peyrot and Ian Bonds. The older generation, which becomes involved in a romantic triangle, is portrayed by Lynda McClary, Terry Hickey and Mark Steckbeck.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | March 29, 1993
In real life, one occasionally sees wealthy and powerful men romantically squiring women who are young enough to be their daughters and even their granddaughters. In the operatic world this is almost unheard of. The rare tenor who goes on singing past his later 50s has usually left behind romantic roles to assume character roles. Basses and baritones occasionally sing well into their 60s -- but they take the parts of older men.This makes the case of Carlo Bergonzi little less than amazing.
FEATURES
By Daniel Webster and Daniel Webster,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 23, 1992
Television has removed much of the risk of pleasing a Christmas audience. On tape, Mikhail Baryshnikov, forever young, dances on in "The Nutcracker." Snow falls annually on the Waltons and turkeys keep showing up at the Cratchits' house.Into the ever-circling Christmas legends comes a comic love story as PBS broadcasts the Metropolitan Opera's performance of not "Hansel and Gretel," but Donizetti's "L'Elisir d'Amore" (tonight at 8 on Channels 22 and 67). Nothing in this opera suggests Christmas -- unless it is to reaffirm the gift of love.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | March 29, 1993
In real life, one occasionally sees wealthy and powerful men romantically squiring women who are young enough to be their daughters and even their granddaughters. In the operatic world this is almost unheard of. The rare tenor who goes on singing past his later 50s has usually left behind romantic roles to assume character roles. Basses and baritones occasionally sing well into their 60s -- but they take the parts of older men.This makes the case of Carlo Bergonzi little less than amazing.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | July 2, 1992
The Young Victorian Theatre Company is presenting Gilbert and Sullivan's "Princess Ida," an operetta with a feminist theme, July 9-11 and July 16-18 in Centennial Hall at Bryn Mawr School on West Melrose Avenue. All performances begin at 8:15 p.m. Tickets are $18.50 for general admission, $17 for seniors and patrons and $12 for children. For details, call (410) 323-3077.The company, now in its 22nd season, recently received endowment grants totaling $10,000. This year's annual operating budget is $60,000.
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