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Kyrgyzstan

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By David Huwiler | October 12, 2001
BISHKEK, Kyrgyzstan - Bishkek remains peaceful, but there are moments of tension. My anxiety increased appreciably at a little past 1 on Monday morning when the U.S. Embassy phoned to tell me that "U.S. and other forces" have begun attacking locations in Afghanistan, the border of which is less than 60 miles from southern Kyrgyzstan (pronounced keer-ghi-STON). I was further advised to "maintain as low a public profile as possible" and to "remain at home for the time being." There are other signs of worry here.
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NEWS
By Mike Miller and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 16, 2010
The 10th annual Under Armour Baltimore Marathon has begun in cool temperature under sunny skies. Nearly 5,000 runners began to cross the starting line at Russell and Camden Streets at 8:01 a.m. Saturday, embarking on the 26.2-mile course that will take a serpentine route through city neighborhoods. The course remains the same for a second consecutive year. Event organizers have sold out all four of its races for a fourth consecutive year, and are expecting a record 22,281 runners representing 25 countries and all 50 states to run the streets before the finish line closes at approximately 3 p.m. This year's purse of $140,000 places Baltimore among the top 10 most lucrative marathons in the country.
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NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 25, 2005
MOSCOW - With the swift, chaotic collapse yesterday of the government of Kyrgyzstan and with President Askar Akayev's decision to flee, autocrats seem to be toppling across the states of the former Soviet Union. But the triumph of opposition demonstrators in Kyrgyzstan, Ukraine and Georgia in the past 18 months may have shored up rather than eroded the positions of the remaining post-Soviet strongmen, especially in strategic Central Asia. With surprising speed, a protest yesterday by thousands of opposition supporters on the streets of the Kyrgyz capital, Bishkek, turned into a rout of government forces, as demonstrators overran government offices and the state-run television network.
NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | February 4, 2009
Iraqi video describes luring female bombers BAGHDAD: A woman accused of helping recruit dozens of female suicide bombers looked into the camera and described the process: trolling society for likely candidates and then patiently converting the women from troubled souls into deadly attackers. The accounts were in a video released yesterday by Iraqi police. In a separate prison interview with the Associated Press, with interrogators nearby, the woman said she was part of a plot in which young women were raped and then sent to her for matronly advice.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | April 16, 1992
PISHPEK, Kyrgyzstan -- North of town, the land is flatter than Kansas, and seems to stretch on forever, but the border is nearby so not much of it belongs to Kyrgyzstan.South of town -- by a matter of yards, not miles -- the mountains rise up, to 16,000 feet or so, and they march steadily southward and upward, hoisting the whole country as they go, until they reach China and India and join the Himalayas.Pishpek sits on Kyrgyzstan's tiny brim of arable land, a flange of usable space. It used to be an unexciting administrative center, a provincial town.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 31, 1995
BISHKEK, Kyrgyzstan -- Yuldash Yusupov, a car mechanic, is preparing to sacrifice a sheep near his tent in this mountain-ringed capital, then feast on the animal's blood."
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 3, 2005
MOSCOW - Kyrgyzstan President Askar Akayev has agreed in principle to resign, a move that would clear the way for the nation's revolutionary government to proceed with new presidential elections in June, authorities said yesterday. In a development that signaled a possible end to the political impasse that has threatened the nation with instability since Akayev was driven from power on March 24, Parliament leaders said they would meet with the ousted president today in Moscow to discuss his formal abdication.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 31, 2002
BEIJING - A little-known Muslim group from western China that Washington recently branded as terrorists planned attacks on Western embassies in neighboring Kyrgyzstan, a U.S. official said yesterday. During a friendly visit to Beijing this week, Deputy U.S. Secretary of State Richard L. Armitage disclosed that the United States had placed the group, the East Turkestan Islamic Movement, on Washington's terror list, freezing any U.S.-based assets it might hold. The group has killed civilians, he said.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 22, 2005
MOSCOW - Thousands of demonstrators took over government buildings, blocked roads and airports and staged demonstrations across Kyrgyzstan yesterday to protest alleged fraud in recent elections in the impoverished Central Asian nation that is the site of a major United States air base. Government officials and eyewitnesses agree that the government no longer appears to be in control of Osh and Jalalabad, two of Kyrgyzstan's largest urban centers, in the face of escalating protests. Protesters demanding the resignation of President Askar Akayev took to the streets of those cities to find them deserted of police or troops.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 24, 2005
MOSCOW - After days of tumultuous public protests, the Central Asian nation of Kyrgyzstan, a U.S. ally in an impoverished and restive region, may be on the brink of greater upheavals and even civil war, analysts here are warning. "The situation to me seems to be sliding into chaos," Andrei A. Piontkovsky, director of the Center for Strategic Studies said here yesterday. "And nobody knows the way out. Not Askar Akayev" - Kyrgyzstan's president - "not the opposition, not the leaders in Moscow and Washington."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 5, 2005
MOSCOW - President Askar Akayev of Kyrgyzstan resigned yesterday after receiving assurances that he would not face prosecution for any wrongdoing during his 14 years as the country's only post-Soviet leader. Akayev's resignation, effective today, removed the last legal obstacle to holding a new presidential election, now scheduled for June, and could reduce political tensions that have divided the opposition leaders jockeying for power. Akayev, who fled to Russia in the days after opposition protests toppled his government March 24, signed his resignation in the Kyrgyz Embassy here after a day of talks with leaders of the country's new Parliament, including its speaker, Omurbek Tekebayev.
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 3, 2005
MOSCOW - Kyrgyzstan President Askar Akayev has agreed in principle to resign, a move that would clear the way for the nation's revolutionary government to proceed with new presidential elections in June, authorities said yesterday. In a development that signaled a possible end to the political impasse that has threatened the nation with instability since Akayev was driven from power on March 24, Parliament leaders said they would meet with the ousted president today in Moscow to discuss his formal abdication.
NEWS
By Michael Rosenthal and Ben Barry | March 31, 2005
THIS MONTH, in the last days of President Askar Akayev's rule in Kyrgyzstan, a police officer pulled over our car of election observers in a blatant attempt at extortion. The officer, like many of his colleagues in other post-Soviet states, flagged us down on foot, because the police force was too poor to afford patrol cars. Our local driver confidently refused to pay, saying that he had broken no rules and that the foreigners in the car could attest to that. The officer sheepishly replied, "So you're saying it's useless" to keep pressing for money?
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 30, 2005
MOSCOW - Speaking publicly for the first time since fleeing from the uprising that overthrew his government last week, ousted Kyrgyzstan President Askar Akayev accused his country's new leaders yesterday of engineering a well-planned plot but made conflicting remarks about whether he would step down. In a telephone interview on Russia's Ekho Moskvy radio network, Akayev said he refused to recognize the authority of opposition leader Kurmanbek Bakiyev, Kyrgyzstan's interim prime minister and president, saying he and other opposition figures seized the government by force.
NEWS
March 29, 2005
THEY HAVE THEIR OWN way of pulling off revolutions in Central Asia, but however peculiar the uprising in Kyrgyzstan has been so far, it holds powerful implications for an entire region of ruthless despots, crooked cops, destitute workers and radical underground Islamists. It's not quite a new day dawning for the Kyrgyz - not yet, anyway - as the squabbling for power mostly involves opposition leaders who until recently were part of the now-defunct government. They include a former police chief who may have been railroaded into prison by the previous regime but who is, after all, a former police chief.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 28, 2005
BISHKEK, Kyrgyzstan - Former opposition leaders who took power here last week after protests ousted President Askar A. Akayev were at risk yesterday of splitting into rival camps. The political contest pitted a departing parliament against a new parliament chosen in disputed elections that sparked the country's political crisis. Yesterday, former opposition leader Felix Kulov, newly appointed as chief of security forces, surprised many of his supporters by bluntly declaring that the departing parliament must yield authority to the new legislators, who are strongly pro-Akayev.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 5, 2005
MOSCOW - President Askar Akayev of Kyrgyzstan resigned yesterday after receiving assurances that he would not face prosecution for any wrongdoing during his 14 years as the country's only post-Soviet leader. Akayev's resignation, effective today, removed the last legal obstacle to holding a new presidential election, now scheduled for June, and could reduce political tensions that have divided the opposition leaders jockeying for power. Akayev, who fled to Russia in the days after opposition protests toppled his government March 24, signed his resignation in the Kyrgyz Embassy here after a day of talks with leaders of the country's new Parliament, including its speaker, Omurbek Tekebayev.
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 30, 2005
MOSCOW - Speaking publicly for the first time since fleeing from the uprising that overthrew his government last week, ousted Kyrgyzstan President Askar Akayev accused his country's new leaders yesterday of engineering a well-planned plot but made conflicting remarks about whether he would step down. In a telephone interview on Russia's Ekho Moskvy radio network, Akayev said he refused to recognize the authority of opposition leader Kurmanbek Bakiyev, Kyrgyzstan's interim prime minister and president, saying he and other opposition figures seized the government by force.
NEWS
March 27, 2005
NATIONAL Funerals begin for Minn. victims The first funerals for the victims of the school shootings in Red Lake, Minn., began yesterday. Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty, Sen. Norm Coleman and more than 100 police officers attended services for Daryl Lussier, 58, a tribal police officer, and his longtime companion, Michelle Sigana, 31. [Page 3a] Schiavo family rift escalates As legal prospects dimmed for the parents of Terri Schiavo, lawyers for her husband and parents clashed over her condition and whether the removal of the brain-damaged woman's feeding tube was causing her undue suffering.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 27, 2005
BISHKEK, Kyrgyzstan - Parliament approved plans yesterday for a June presidential election as Kyrgyzstan's new authorities struggled to solidify the legal basis for their takeover of power from ousted President Askar A. Akayev. Acting President Kurmanbek Bakiyev, a former opposition leader, said he expected to run. As many as 3,000 Akayev supporters rallied yesterday in his home region of Chym Korgon, 55 miles from Bishkek, saying they would march on the capital. In Moscow, the Kremlin issued a statement yesterday implying that Akayev was in Russia.
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