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Kyra Sedgwick

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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 14, 2008
Kyra Sedgwick has her own personal take on the appeal of her hit cable series, The Closer, and it goes dead against the conventional wisdom of character growth as the key to great drama. Sedgwick believes LAPD Deputy Police Chief Brenda Leigh Johnson is such a fan favorite in large part because she shows no real growth, emotional or otherwise - ever. "You know, it's funny, but that's sort of the thing about her, she's really not that changed since the start of the series," says Sedgwick, who also serves as co-executive producer.
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By DAVID ZURAWIK | January 26, 2009
TNT is using its hit The Closer to serve as lead-in tonight to the premiere of Trust Me, a new series starring Eric McCormack and Tom Cavanagh. Trust me, there is almost nothing in this drama that works. The series is set in an ad agency with McCormack and Cavanaugh playing two best friends since childhood who now work together thinking up ads for products like cell phones. In the opening scenes, the two are shown mid-day stretched out at a pool, recovering from hangovers. They lie shamelessly about how hard they are working when the boss calls.
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FEATURES
September 10, 2007
Critic's Pick -- Brenda (Kyra Sedgwick) must deal with her prime suspect's unbreakable alibi in the season finale of The Closer (9 p.m., TNT).
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 18, 2008
Once upon a time, there was a land called Basic Cable TV that was filled with televangelists, infotainment, Atlanta Braves baseball, wrestling and endless reruns of the 1960s sitcom The Andy Griffith Show. That world of 1980s cable TV seemed centuries away yesterday as AMC's Mad Men, a brilliant series about post-World War II Madison Avenue, and FX's Damages, a hard-edged legal drama starring Glenn Close, made history as the first basic cable series to earn nominations as best dramas. They joined a field of finalists for the 60th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards that was dominated by cable productions - at the expense of the broadcast networks.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK | January 26, 2009
TNT is using its hit The Closer to serve as lead-in tonight to the premiere of Trust Me, a new series starring Eric McCormack and Tom Cavanagh. Trust me, there is almost nothing in this drama that works. The series is set in an ad agency with McCormack and Cavanaugh playing two best friends since childhood who now work together thinking up ads for products like cell phones. In the opening scenes, the two are shown mid-day stretched out at a pool, recovering from hangovers. They lie shamelessly about how hard they are working when the boss calls.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | July 3, 1996
Painted in sepia tones from a golden palette of sentimentality, "Phenomenon" courts diabetic coma with its persistent sweetness. Despite all that, it's hard to resist.John Travolta stars as an auto mechanic in a little farming town that could have been cast in "Field of Dreams." (Is this heaven? No, it's Iowa. I mean, Northern California.) He plays George Malley, the quintessential nice guy, who takes a breather from his 37th birthday party in a local bar to walk out in the street and toast the stars.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 18, 2008
Once upon a time, there was a land called Basic Cable TV that was filled with televangelists, infotainment, Atlanta Braves baseball, wrestling and endless reruns of the 1960s sitcom The Andy Griffith Show. That world of 1980s cable TV seemed centuries away yesterday as AMC's Mad Men, a brilliant series about post-World War II Madison Avenue, and FX's Damages, a hard-edged legal drama starring Glenn Close, made history as the first basic cable series to earn nominations as best dramas. They joined a field of finalists for the 60th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards that was dominated by cable productions - at the expense of the broadcast networks.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 4, 2005
SUN SCORE ** 1/2 The Woodsman clicks mostly when it depicts the brooding romance between a child molester (Kevin Bacon) just released from prison and the fierce, determined woman (Kyra Sedgwick) who breaks into his zone of privacy. In real life, Bacon and Sedgwick are husband and wife. Their scenes mark one of the rare times an off-screen couple's intimacy enriches on-screen passion. Bacon plays a man petrified by his own impulses; emotionally and physically, he's blanched. Sedgwick plays a robust, chin-first woman who works with him at a lumberyard and senses that he has "a dark, deep secret."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | September 18, 1992
Whoever said youth is too precious to be wasted on the young didn't really get it right; on the basis of "Singles" it would appear that depression, anomie, self-loathing and fear are entirely too precious to be wasted on the young -- they simply don't know how to enjoy them yet."Singles" examines the lives of a set of young men and women in Seattle, Wash., evidently a bastion of counterculture values in the far Northwest. Not only is it wet and rainy there, it's still the '60s.The setting isn't exactly a commune, but almost: It's an apartment building, each of whose units has been rented by a twentysomething yearner after happiness.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 19, 2003
Garth and Hub McCann are the kind of uncles we all wish we had. And Secondhand Lions, the story of a summer spent as reluctant mentors to a great-nephew they didn't know they had, is the kind of movie we all hope for. Entertaining, thrilling and honestly sentimental, it's an equal-opportunity crowd-pleaser: Kids will love the adventure aspects, adults will like the memories it evokes of the fun relatives they grew up adoring, and everyone should appreciate...
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 14, 2008
Kyra Sedgwick has her own personal take on the appeal of her hit cable series, The Closer, and it goes dead against the conventional wisdom of character growth as the key to great drama. Sedgwick believes LAPD Deputy Police Chief Brenda Leigh Johnson is such a fan favorite in large part because she shows no real growth, emotional or otherwise - ever. "You know, it's funny, but that's sort of the thing about her, she's really not that changed since the start of the series," says Sedgwick, who also serves as co-executive producer.
FEATURES
December 3, 2007
Critic's Pick -- Brenda (Kyra Sedgwick) searches for a gang that killed two guards during an armored-car heist in a holiday-themed The Closer (8 p.m., TNT).
NEWS
December 2, 2007
THEATER JOE TURNER'S COME AND GONE / / Previews start 7 p.m. Friday. Showtimes vary through Jan. 13. Center Stage, 700 N. Calvert St. 410-332-0033 or centerstage.org ....................... Herald Loomis has lost his wife and his soul in August Wilson's play, set in a Pittsburgh boardinghouse in 1911. Released after seven years on a chain gang, Loomis has been on an endless search for Martha. As he is led through his darkest hour by a succession of guides, both contemporaries and spiritual ancestors, Loomis' journey becomes a haunting allegory for the African-American experience.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley | May 27, 2007
KATHARINE HEPBURN 100TH ANNIVERSARY COLLECTION -- Warner Home Video / $59.92 Every time I watch a movie starring the wondrous Katharine Hepburn, I'm reminded of all the ways in which she was a feminist symbol, and all the ways in which she failed to be. Ample evidence for both sides of the argument runs through The Katharine Hepburn 100th Anniversary Collection, which is being released Tuesday. The six-disc box set is a compendium of early films, cult classics and prestige items, and includes The Corn is Green, Morning Glory, Dragon Seed, Sylvia Scarlett, Undercurrent and Without Love.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 4, 2005
SUN SCORE ** 1/2 The Woodsman clicks mostly when it depicts the brooding romance between a child molester (Kevin Bacon) just released from prison and the fierce, determined woman (Kyra Sedgwick) who breaks into his zone of privacy. In real life, Bacon and Sedgwick are husband and wife. Their scenes mark one of the rare times an off-screen couple's intimacy enriches on-screen passion. Bacon plays a man petrified by his own impulses; emotionally and physically, he's blanched. Sedgwick plays a robust, chin-first woman who works with him at a lumberyard and senses that he has "a dark, deep secret."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 19, 2003
Garth and Hub McCann are the kind of uncles we all wish we had. And Secondhand Lions, the story of a summer spent as reluctant mentors to a great-nephew they didn't know they had, is the kind of movie we all hope for. Entertaining, thrilling and honestly sentimental, it's an equal-opportunity crowd-pleaser: Kids will love the adventure aspects, adults will like the memories it evokes of the fun relatives they grew up adoring, and everyone should appreciate...
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley | May 27, 2007
KATHARINE HEPBURN 100TH ANNIVERSARY COLLECTION -- Warner Home Video / $59.92 Every time I watch a movie starring the wondrous Katharine Hepburn, I'm reminded of all the ways in which she was a feminist symbol, and all the ways in which she failed to be. Ample evidence for both sides of the argument runs through The Katharine Hepburn 100th Anniversary Collection, which is being released Tuesday. The six-disc box set is a compendium of early films, cult classics and prestige items, and includes The Corn is Green, Morning Glory, Dragon Seed, Sylvia Scarlett, Undercurrent and Without Love.
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