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By Rachel Marsden | December 22, 2011
In a victory for common sense, America's top trading partner has become the first country to bail on the Kyoto Protocol before the nearly $7 billion in noncompliance costs comes due next year. Thus ends a pointless and pricey exercise in martyrdom. Having committed to reducing 1990-level carbon emissions by 6 percent, Canada somehow managed to go in the other direction by about a third. Not that anyone in Canada would have noticed by any tangible common-sense measure, except perhaps for all the Canadian plants and trees quietly cheering the abundance of carbon dioxide and overproducing fresh oxygen as a result.
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NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | December 22, 2011
In a victory for common sense, America's top trading partner has become the first country to bail on the Kyoto Protocol before the nearly $7 billion in noncompliance costs comes due next year. Thus ends a pointless and pricey exercise in martyrdom. Having committed to reducing 1990-level carbon emissions by 6 percent, Canada somehow managed to go in the other direction by about a third. Not that anyone in Canada would have noticed by any tangible common-sense measure, except perhaps for all the Canadian plants and trees quietly cheering the abundance of carbon dioxide and overproducing fresh oxygen as a result.
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NEWS
By Hector Tobar and Hector Tobar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 12, 2004
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina - The United States is the big odd man out as diplomats, scientists and environmentalists from more than 190 countries gather at the 10th meeting of the United Nations' Convention on Climate Change. The convention's Kyoto Protocol, with its mandatory reduction of "greenhouse gases" that cause global warming, goes into force next year. Discussions of new limits are expected to begin here when official delegations arrive Wednesday, near the end of the 12-day conference.
NEWS
By Robert Maranto | January 20, 2010
As we observe today's first anniversary of Barack Obama's inauguration, Sen. John McCain must be having quite a laugh. Back during the 2008 presidential election, my liberal friends warned me that if I voted for Mr. McCain, America would stay in Iraq and escalate in Afghanistan, propping up the corrupt government there. They said that Guantanamo would stay open, harming America's image abroad. Unemployment would rise, and the Bush-era deficits would continue to mortgage America's future.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 24, 2001
BONN, Germany - With the Bush administration on the sidelines, the world's leading countries hammered out a compromise agreement yesterday finishing a treaty that for the first time would formally require industrialized countries to cut emissions of gases linked to global warming. The agreement, announced here yesterday after three days of marathon bargaining, rescued the Kyoto Protocol, the preliminary accord framed in Japan in 1997, that was the first step toward requiring cuts in such gases.
NEWS
December 15, 2009
- The atmosphere at the U.N. climate conference grew more tense after talks were suspended for most of Monday's session - a sign of the developing nations' deep distrust of the promises by industrial countries to cut greenhouse gas emissions. The Africa-led suspension went to the core of suspicions by poor countries that wealthier ones were trying to soften their commitments and evade penalties for missing their targets. Talks were halted most of the day, resuming only after conference president Connie Hedegaard of Denmark assured developing countries she was not trying to kill the Kyoto Protocol, the 1997 document that requires industrial nations to cut emissions and imposes penalties if they fail to do so. Kyoto makes no demands on developing countries.
NEWS
April 2, 2001
THE KYOTO international treaty to combat global warming -- as written -- is a flawed document, and it's unlikely the U.S. Senate would ratify it. But President Bush's brusque dismissal of the world climate treaty, claiming it will harm the American economy, creates a crisis for both the environment and for U.S. diplomacy. The president's action threatens to doom the 1997 treaty, which aims to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases below 1990 levels by 2012. While no industrial nation has yet ratified the treaty, there are strong commitments for joint action in Europe and Japan and in much of the rest of the world.
NEWS
April 7, 2002
IF OUR PATCH of warm winters hasn't provoked some wondering about global warming, then that huge chunk of ice that recently and dramatically broke off Antarctica was certainly cause to sit up and take notice. This was a staggering geophysical event that unfolded with startling rapidity, over just 35 days. About 650 feet thick and larger than Rhode Island, the disintegrated ice shelf probably was part of the Antarctic Peninsula for 12,000 years. At minimum, its collapse highlights the daunting scientific, political and economic crosscurrents in the long-running war over the climatic effects of greenhouse gases.
NEWS
By MIGUEL BUSTILLO and MIGUEL BUSTILLO,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 8, 2005
MONTREAL -- Canada's Prime Minister Paul Martin took aim yesterday at the United States for its refusal to negotiate a new global warming treaty, telling a United Nations conference that the world's most powerful economy needs to resume participating in international talks to reduce greenhouse gases. "Climate change is a global challenge that demands a global response. Yet there are nations that resist, voices that attempt to diminish the urgency or dismiss the science, or declare, either in word or indifference, that this is not our problem to solve.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 15, 1998
After an all-night session in Buenos Aires, Argentina, negotiators from more than 150 countries set a deadline early yesterday of two years for adopting operational rules for cutting emissions of industrial waste gases that are believed to cause global warming.With that, proponents of the Kyoto Protocol, a treaty under which the reductions are to be made, declared victory in the two-week round of talks.The treaty's backers said the conference revealed a shift in the worldwide debate on how to deal with the possibility of disruptive climate change brought about by emissions of heat-trapping greenhouse gases, mainly carbon dioxide, produced by the burning of oil, coal, wood and natural gas.Buenos Aires made clear, they said, that industry and developing countries were becoming more engaged in the effort to control emissions and in trying to make the Kyoto Protocol work.
NEWS
December 15, 2009
- The atmosphere at the U.N. climate conference grew more tense after talks were suspended for most of Monday's session - a sign of the developing nations' deep distrust of the promises by industrial countries to cut greenhouse gas emissions. The Africa-led suspension went to the core of suspicions by poor countries that wealthier ones were trying to soften their commitments and evade penalties for missing their targets. Talks were halted most of the day, resuming only after conference president Connie Hedegaard of Denmark assured developing countries she was not trying to kill the Kyoto Protocol, the 1997 document that requires industrial nations to cut emissions and imposes penalties if they fail to do so. Kyoto makes no demands on developing countries.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 24, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Dozens of world leaders are to gather at the United Nations today for a full agenda of talks on how to fight global warming, and President Bush is skipping all of the day's events but the dinner. His focus instead is on his own gathering of leaders in Washington later this week, a meeting with the same stated goal: a reduction in the emissions blamed for climate change, but a fundamentally different idea of how to achieve it. Bush's aides say that the parallel meeting does not compete against the United Nations' process - hijacking it, as his critics contend.
NEWS
By MIGUEL BUSTILLO and MIGUEL BUSTILLO,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 8, 2005
MONTREAL -- Canada's Prime Minister Paul Martin took aim yesterday at the United States for its refusal to negotiate a new global warming treaty, telling a United Nations conference that the world's most powerful economy needs to resume participating in international talks to reduce greenhouse gases. "Climate change is a global challenge that demands a global response. Yet there are nations that resist, voices that attempt to diminish the urgency or dismiss the science, or declare, either in word or indifference, that this is not our problem to solve.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 16, 2005
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was justified in refusing to regulate carbon dioxide, the primary greenhouse gas linked to global warming, as a pollutant under the Clean Air Act, a federal court ruled yesterday in a major legal victory for the Bush administration. A coalition of 12 states and numerous groups - including the city of Baltimore - had argued that the EPA was legally bound to regulate carbon dioxide under the Clean Air Act because global warming was a demonstrable threat to public health and safety.
NEWS
By Tom Hundley and Mark Silva and Tom Hundley and Mark Silva,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 7, 2005
EDINBURGH, Scotland - As leaders of the world's wealthiest industrialized nations assembled yesterday for their summit at the Gleneagles resort and police scuffled with protesters, British Prime Minister Tony Blair tried to lower expectations for breakthroughs on global warming and aid to Africa. For Blair, the host of this year's Group of Eight summit, it was a roller-coaster day. Just before noon, he received word that London had been selected as the site for the 2012 Olympics, beating Paris by four votes.
NEWS
By Hector Tobar and Hector Tobar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 12, 2004
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina - The United States is the big odd man out as diplomats, scientists and environmentalists from more than 190 countries gather at the 10th meeting of the United Nations' Convention on Climate Change. The convention's Kyoto Protocol, with its mandatory reduction of "greenhouse gases" that cause global warming, goes into force next year. Discussions of new limits are expected to begin here when official delegations arrive Wednesday, near the end of the 12-day conference.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 12, 2000
WASHINGTON - President Clinton called yesterday for new federal regulations limiting power plants' emissions of carbon dioxide, a gas thought to cause global climatic change, through a system similar to the rules in place for pollutants that cause smog and acid rain. It would be the first time federal regulations would specifically control emissions of carbon dioxide, the main so-called greenhouse gas. Clinton called for similar controls on emissions of mercury, another pollutant that is given off by some power plants but is not regulated under air pollution laws.
NEWS
July 28, 2001
DESPITE the effusion of self-congratulation demonstrated by European politicians at the Bonn summit on global warming, many obstacles remain to achieving meaningful reductions in greenhouse gases. Agreement by 178 nations on basic rules for cutting climate-changing emissions will not lead to notable reductions for a decade. And the net effect of this week's compromise accord would be a cut of less than 2 percent in warming gases rather than the 5.8 percent reduction for 2012 set by the original Kyoto Protocol.
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