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By David Zurawik, and Chris Kaltenbach and David Zurawik, and Chris Kaltenbach,sun television writers | May 16, 1999
These 10 shows demonstrate what television can do in gifted hands, and don't let the elitists tell you it isn't art. Go back through the 122 episodes of the just-canceled "Homicide: Life on the Street," and you will be astonished by how many great ones there were. "Homicide" might have a higher batting average of best episodes than any series this side of "Law & Order." And the highs on "Homicide" were definitely higher. There's plenty of room for disagreement, and we could easily include another dozen, but here are our Top 10 picks.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 4, 2005
He just closed his eyes and thought of Bill Clinton. That's how Kyle Secor, the boyishly good looking, 48-year-old co-star of ABC's hit series Commander in Chief, describes his method in developing the role of Rod Calloway, husband of the first female president of the United States. "I got some books on first ladies, because I really didn't know much about the position, and that is basically what I would be taking over. I read about Dolley Madison and Jackie Kennedy, but I still couldn't feel it," the actor says.
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NEWS
September 3, 1995
"Peace In Every Step," by Tich Nhat Hanh. The book that remindes people how to breath every step of the way through life.- Kyle Secor (Detective Tim Bayliss)"Deep Politics and the Death of JFK," by Peter Dale Scott. He is a long time conspiracy theorist and this is one of the best books on the subject - So read 'em and weep.- Richard Belzer (Detective John Munch)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Terry Lawson and Terry Lawson,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | April 1, 2004
The television series Homicide: Life on the Street never actually jumped the shark, though it got close the season that Bayliss (Kyle Secor) decided to explore his repressed gayness. But by "The Complete Season 4," it had dumped the documentary-like everydayness of the original episodes and the great book that inspired it to become one of the best cop shows ever aired. The fourth season found the show without the disgraced Beau Felton (Daniel Baldwin) and the retired Stan Bolander (Ned Beatty)
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | December 9, 1991
"Delusion," which opens today at the Charles, is a nasty bit of business from a group of young people that have almost certainly read too much Jim Thompson. Why aren't these kids reading Faulkner, Wolfe, Hemingway or Melville? The answer is that they've probably never heard of Faulkner, Wolfe, Hemingway or Melville.Thompson, a hack from Annadarko, Okla., had a minor talent but such a morose view of life and human pathology that his original paperbacks always boasted a vivid spark of nihilism.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 17, 1995
Los Angeles -- NBC's "Homicide: Life on the Streets" is going through some character changes this summer. Two are going, one is coming, and there's going to be even more of Frank Pembleton (Andre Braugher), easily the most interesting African-American character in prime-time.Just as the critically acclaimed series finally won a measure of security in May with its first full order of 22 episodes from the network, it was announced that Ned Beatty and Daniel Baldwin were leaving the show.Beatty said he wanted to return to feature films.
FEATURES
May 3, 1998
To: Warren Littlefield, president of NBC EntertainmentFrom: Arts & Society StaffRe: "Elaine!" the seriesDear Mr. Littlefield:A successor to "Seinfeld"? Let's face it, that David Spade show ** jTC doesn't cut it. Instead, think spinoff: Bring Elaine Benes home to Baltimore (OK, Towson officially) for "Elaine!"Imagine: You keep your "Seinfeld" devotees, "Ally McBeal" fans tune in to see Elaine out-neurotic her, and Baltimore stays in prime time after "Homicide" dies. Talk about win-win!The comic possibilities are endless.
FEATURES
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 24, 1998
Last year at this time, the consensus was that "Homicide: Life on the Street" was starting its last season on NBC.Tomorrow, the critically acclaimed cop drama based in Baltimore will start its seventh year, and the end is now nowhere in sight.As the Emmy-Award-winning Andre Braugher put it in an interview last week, "If the quality of the writing is sustained, I believe the show has the potential to go on for many, many more years."And this, despite the loss of Braugher whose Frank Pembleton character handed in his badge last May after a shootout that left his partner, Tim Bayliss (Kyle Secor)
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | February 24, 1995
The choice at 10 p.m. is painfully tough, but it's the sort of pain that makes for good TV: Both "Homicide: Life on the Street" and "Picket Fences" offer original episodes tonight. If you are forced to choose, I'd say watch "Homicide," because "Picket Fences" is bound to be available in reruns, and "Homicide," regrettably, may not.* "The Gordon Elliott Show" (9 a.m.-10 a.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Watch during the two-minute closing segment to see Baltimoreans responding to questions about today's topic: family feuds over wedding plans.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN STAFF | March 29, 1996
"Due South" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Series star Paul Gross joins the growing ranks of actors getting done up in drag in the name of art. Mountie Fraser, trying to uncover a rare bottle of Scotch, has to go undercover as a teacher in an all-girls private school. CBS."20/20" (10 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Barbara Walters interviews Robert Shapiro, the original head man of O.J. Simpson's dream team who later had a major falling out with his fellow defense lawyers."Homicide: Life on the Street" (10 p.m.-11 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | January 30, 2000
Stanley Bolander (Ned Beatty) is retired and living in St Michael's. Frank Pembleton (Andre Braugher) is teaching at a Jesuit college. And Tim Bayliss (Kyle Secor) is standing in a river fly-fishing while taking an extended leave from police work. Those are the places that "Homicide: The Movie" finds some of our favorite detectives during its opening minutes. I know it is early to start beating the drum, with the NBC movie not airing until Sunday, Feb. 13, but the screening cassette arrived one recent morning and, of course, I put the rest of the day on hold and raced to the VCR to see what executive producer Tom Fontana and his colleagues have done with the "Homicide" crew since last we met in May. Is it worth marking your calendar?
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | October 10, 1999
Under the heading "Zen Boy Finds Work," one of the nicer little surprises of the new fall season is Kyle Secor showing up on "Party of Five" as a publisher who hires Julia (Neve Campbell) to write a book for his firm. If you missed the sixth- season premiere of the critically acclaimed family drama Tuesday, don't worry, Secor will be appearing in the next seven episodes as Julia comes to work for him. Ultimately, he and Julia will even sleep together. (Hey, this is Fox, after all. Workplaces exist on Fox mainly so characters can meet other characters with whom to mate.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 21, 1999
The final moments of "Homicide: Life on the Street" find Detectives Meldrick Lewis (Clark Johnson) and Rene Sheppard (Michael Michele) in an alley in the dark searching for clues to the murder of a man whose body lays nearby.Lewis probes a clump of weeds with the toe of his shoe and the beam of his flashlight. "If I could just find this thing, I could go home," he says, not explaining what exactly the "thing" is."You won't find what you're looking for," Sheppard says dismissively, shining her flashlight on the other side of the alley.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, and Chris Kaltenbach and David Zurawik, and Chris Kaltenbach,sun television writers | May 16, 1999
These 10 shows demonstrate what television can do in gifted hands, and don't let the elitists tell you it isn't art. Go back through the 122 episodes of the just-canceled "Homicide: Life on the Street," and you will be astonished by how many great ones there were. "Homicide" might have a higher batting average of best episodes than any series this side of "Law & Order." And the highs on "Homicide" were definitely higher. There's plenty of room for disagreement, and we could easily include another dozen, but here are our Top 10 picks.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 24, 1998
For the first half hour of the interview, Michael Michele has been playing nice-nice. She carefully considers each word and chooses only the positive ones about her new best friends at "Homicide: Life on the Street."Then she is asked about the background of her character, Detective Rene Sheppard, which, according to executive producers Tom Fontana and Barry Levinson, includes being a former beauty queen."I hated it," she says without hesitation. "I hated it."And now the words start coming faster.
FEATURES
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 24, 1998
Last year at this time, the consensus was that "Homicide: Life on the Street" was starting its last season on NBC.Tomorrow, the critically acclaimed cop drama based in Baltimore will start its seventh year, and the end is now nowhere in sight.As the Emmy-Award-winning Andre Braugher put it in an interview last week, "If the quality of the writing is sustained, I believe the show has the potential to go on for many, many more years."And this, despite the loss of Braugher whose Frank Pembleton character handed in his badge last May after a shootout that left his partner, Tim Bayliss (Kyle Secor)
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | April 28, 1995
More sweeps tactics are on display on CBS, while cable's Discovery Channel takes a sweeping look at the dramatic U.S. evacuation of Saigon, which occurred 20 years ago today.* "Diagnosis Murder" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Sweeps ploy #1: The network's nighttime series aren't doing so hot but "The Young and the Restless" is number one among daytime soaps. Thus, members of that cast do a night shift in this show, including Eric Braeden, Lauralee Bell, Melody Thomas Scott and Doug Davidson.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | January 30, 2000
Stanley Bolander (Ned Beatty) is retired and living in St Michael's. Frank Pembleton (Andre Braugher) is teaching at a Jesuit college. And Tim Bayliss (Kyle Secor) is standing in a river fly-fishing while taking an extended leave from police work. Those are the places that "Homicide: The Movie" finds some of our favorite detectives during its opening minutes. I know it is early to start beating the drum, with the NBC movie not airing until Sunday, Feb. 13, but the screening cassette arrived one recent morning and, of course, I put the rest of the day on hold and raced to the VCR to see what executive producer Tom Fontana and his colleagues have done with the "Homicide" crew since last we met in May. Is it worth marking your calendar?
FEATURES
May 3, 1998
To: Warren Littlefield, president of NBC EntertainmentFrom: Arts & Society StaffRe: "Elaine!" the seriesDear Mr. Littlefield:A successor to "Seinfeld"? Let's face it, that David Spade show ** jTC doesn't cut it. Instead, think spinoff: Bring Elaine Benes home to Baltimore (OK, Towson officially) for "Elaine!"Imagine: You keep your "Seinfeld" devotees, "Ally McBeal" fans tune in to see Elaine out-neurotic her, and Baltimore stays in prime time after "Homicide" dies. Talk about win-win!The comic possibilities are endless.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 17, 1997
There's a new star detective in Homicide, and Pembleton (Andre Braugher) doesn't like it one bit."She's Laura Ballard, flavor of the month, detective du jour," Munch (Richard Belzer) says, sarcastically welcoming Pembleton and Bayliss (Kyle Secor) back from their three months of duty in robbery."Which makes the rest of us?" Pembleton says, not finishing the question as his blood pressure starts to rise."Well, the phrase chopped liver does come to mind," Munch says, excusing himself to pose for a picture with Ballard (Callie Thorne)
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