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NEWS
June 19, 2005
IN 1990, Aung San Suu Kyi was legally elected the leader of Myanmar, then named Burma. But she has spent most of the time since 1989 under some form of detention, including house arrest for the last two years. From time to time, the military junta that imprisons Ms. Suu Kyi promises to release her, but today supporters around the world observe her 60th birthday with no sign of her freedom. The leader of her country's National League for Democracy is only the most well-known Burmese political prisoner.
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NEWS
By From Baltimore Sun news services | September 24, 2008
Officials ask speedy aid in the wake of Ike WASHINGTON: Gulf Coast officials asked lawmakers yesterday for fast federal money for hurricane recovery and a minimum of bureaucratic red tape. Texas is looking at $11.4 billion in damage from Ike, including $16 million in damage to Houston, Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst said. Devastation in Galveston is $2 billion, that city's mayor said. Louisiana is facing $1 billion in damage from Ike and Gustav, Lt. Gov. Mitch Landrieu said. New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin said in prepared testimony that the $40 million cost of evacuating his city for Hurricane Gustav has led to hiring freezes and a halt of any new expenditures until disaster costs are reimbursed.
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NEWS
August 16, 2008
Dr. Khin May Kyi Funeral services will be 11:30 A.M. Sunday, at the Carmel Home with Rev. Maury Riney officiating. The rosary will be prayed in the chapel at 9:30 A.M. before Holy Mass. Burial will be in Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu f flowers, Masses or donations in Dr. Khin May Kyi's name to the Carmel Home are preferred. Memorials may be directed to Carmel Home, 2501 Old Hartford Road, Owensboro, KY, 42303. Arrangements are being handled by the Glenn Funeral Home. Online condolences may be made at www.glennfuneralhome.
NEWS
August 16, 2008
Dr. Khin May Kyi Funeral services will be 11:30 A.M. Sunday, at the Carmel Home with Rev. Maury Riney officiating. The rosary will be prayed in the chapel at 9:30 A.M. before Holy Mass. Burial will be in Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu f flowers, Masses or donations in Dr. Khin May Kyi's name to the Carmel Home are preferred. Memorials may be directed to Carmel Home, 2501 Old Hartford Road, Owensboro, KY, 42303. Arrangements are being handled by the Glenn Funeral Home. Online condolences may be made at www.glennfuneralhome.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 1, 1992
LONDON -- The husband of Daw Aung Saw Suu Kyi, the Burmese dissident who won the 1991 Nobel Peace Prize, said yesterday that his wife's life was in growing peril because she was now refusing even her own family's offers of food and material support as a way to protest her continuing detention.Michael Aris, a British scholar, who met with reporters yesterday in Oxford, said, "I am now very concerned that soon she will have no means at all of sustaining life."Mr. Aris said he did not have any first-hand knowledge about either the health or medical condition of his 47-year-old wife, whom he last saw in August.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 7, 2002
BANGKOK, Thailand - Radiating joy and strength, the woman known throughout Myanmar as "The Lady" stood before a cheering crowd yesterday for the first time in years and proclaimed, "It's a new dawn for the country." Freed yesterday morning after 19 months of house arrest, Aung San Suu Kyi, the leader of the pro-democracy movement, said it was time to move forward from a period of fence-mending to the beginnings of substantive change in the former Burma. After a year and a half of what were called confidence-building talks with the military leadership, "the next step is discussions about policy," Suu Kyi said.
NEWS
December 2, 1995
OPPOSITION LEADER, Aung San Suu Kyi, was both gutty and right in pulling her National League for Democracy from the on-again, off-again National Convention writing a constitution for Burma.That body was convened by, hand-picked by and represents the military junta, which overturned the 1990 election, arrested Mrs. Suu Kyi, suppressed dissent and brooks no real opposition. It goes by the acronym SLORC, for State Law and Order Restoration Council.One of the funnier proposed constitutional articles would ban top office to anyone married to a foreigner.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 15, 1994
YANGON, Myanmar -- Aung San Suu Kyi, the Nobel Peace Prize winner and leader of the Burmese democracy movement who has been under house arrest in Yangon for more than four years, was allowed to break her silence yesterday, telling visitors that, while she was ready to negotiate with her jailers, she would never leave her homeland."
NEWS
May 12, 2004
ON MONDAY, 14 years after a pack of generals stole control of Myanmar from a legally elected democracy party, the still-ruling military junta will convene a national constitutional convention to which it has invited its long-suppressed opponents. In advance, the National League for Democracy, which won those last parliamentary elections in 1990, has been allowed to reopen an office. And there's mounting anticipation that its leader, Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, will be released from house arrest to participate in the national political conference.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 14, 1996
YANGON, Myanmar -- The lesson in democracy begins promptly at 4 each weekend afternoon. Several thousand people gather behind barricades, eyes trained on the fence surrounding a two-story lakeside home. Traffic police, dressed smartly in pressed white coats, keep two lanes open for passing cars.When Aung San Suu Kyi, pink orchids in her brushed-back hair and microphone in hand, appears from behind the fence, the crowd breaks into cheers and applause. For the next hour, the 1991 Nobel Peace Prize winner gamely conducts a forum on democracy in a country run by generals.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 28, 2008
BANGKOK, Thailand - Foreign aid workers have begun reaching remote areas of Myanmar hardest hit by the May 2-3 cyclone, relief agencies said yesterday. These first admissions of foreign workers, issued over the past two days, breach the barrier erected by the government that had delayed delivery of supplies to more than a million people in the remote Irrawaddy River delta. The opening comes more than three weeks after the cyclone, which left 135,000 people dead or missing. The United Nations estimates that 1.5 million survivors deep in the Irrawaddy delta have not yet received any aid. The permissions follow an agreement announced Friday by Ban Ki Moon, the U.N. secretary-general, after a meeting in Myanmar with the leader of that nation's junta, Senior General Than Shwe.
NEWS
By Jared Genser and Meghan Barron | October 26, 2007
This week, on the other side of the world, a 62-year-old woman marks 12 years of sitting alone in her home. The telephone is silent because the line is disconnected. The doorbell never rings because visitors are forbidden. There is no mail or news. For our client, Aung San Suu Kyi, the democratically elected leader of Myanmar and Nobel Peace laureate, little has changed for years - there is almost complete isolation. It has been more than a month since the world witnessed tens of thousands of Buddhist monks in saffron robes marching in solidarity with the Burmese people, protesting the military junta in that country.
NEWS
June 19, 2005
IN 1990, Aung San Suu Kyi was legally elected the leader of Myanmar, then named Burma. But she has spent most of the time since 1989 under some form of detention, including house arrest for the last two years. From time to time, the military junta that imprisons Ms. Suu Kyi promises to release her, but today supporters around the world observe her 60th birthday with no sign of her freedom. The leader of her country's National League for Democracy is only the most well-known Burmese political prisoner.
NEWS
By Richard C. Paddock and Richard C. Paddock,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 19, 2005
YANGON, Myanmar - She is known simply as The Lady. She lives in isolation in her old family home on a quiet lake in the northern part of the city. Armed guards make sure she doesn't leave. Her only known visitor is the doctor who checks on her monthly. She is said to spend her time meditating and reading. The world's only imprisoned Nobel Peace Prize winner, Aung San Suu Kyi has spent nearly 10 of the past 16 years under house arrest or behind bars. There is no sign that Myanmar's military regime plans to free her anytime soon.
NEWS
November 8, 2004
IN RELATIVE terms, Gen. Khin Nyunt was the moderate face of the illegitimate military junta suppressing democracy in long-suffering Myanmar, as Burma's generals renamed their country. But his so-called road map to democracy -- and his talk of reaching an accommodation with arrested pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi -- proved not much more than an illusion to deflect international pressure on the repressive regime. Nonetheless, Gen. Khin Nyunt's recent sacking as prime minister by the junta's strongman, Gen. Than Shwe, is yet more bad news from Yangon.
NEWS
May 12, 2004
ON MONDAY, 14 years after a pack of generals stole control of Myanmar from a legally elected democracy party, the still-ruling military junta will convene a national constitutional convention to which it has invited its long-suppressed opponents. In advance, the National League for Democracy, which won those last parliamentary elections in 1990, has been allowed to reopen an office. And there's mounting anticipation that its leader, Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, will be released from house arrest to participate in the national political conference.
NEWS
October 18, 1991
Burma has been led by isolationists for so long that most of the world had all but forgotten its existence when, in 1989, its military rulers changed the country's name to Myanmar. The regime had come to power a year earlier, when widespread protests forced the resignation of U Ne Win, the country's dictatorial ruler for almost 30 years. Those protests brought to the fore a remarkable woman, who this week was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.Daw Aung San Suu Kyi was born to leadership. Her father is regarded as the founder of modern Burma and would almost certainly have served as its first prime minister had he not been assassinated in 1947, only months before the country became free of British rule.
NEWS
By Jared Genser and Meghan Barron | October 26, 2007
This week, on the other side of the world, a 62-year-old woman marks 12 years of sitting alone in her home. The telephone is silent because the line is disconnected. The doorbell never rings because visitors are forbidden. There is no mail or news. For our client, Aung San Suu Kyi, the democratically elected leader of Myanmar and Nobel Peace laureate, little has changed for years - there is almost complete isolation. It has been more than a month since the world witnessed tens of thousands of Buddhist monks in saffron robes marching in solidarity with the Burmese people, protesting the military junta in that country.
NEWS
October 29, 2003
LAST SUMMER -- after Myanmar's military junta murdered an estimated 100 followers of Aung San Suu Kyi and detained the democracy leader for the third time in 14 years -- President Bush signed into law tough sanctions barring all U.S. imports from the country formerly known as Burma. Many other nations similarly acted: Japan suspended new aid, the European Union tightened its sanctions, and even China, a good friend of the Yangon regime, called for the Nobel Laureate's release. So with the approach of Mr. Bush's trip to Asia last week to attend the 21-nation Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum, 35 U.S. senators sent him a letter asking him to put on a "full-court press" to highlight at that gathering Myanmar's repression, and the administration sent out strong advance signals that the president would significantly raise the profile of U.S. concerns.
NEWS
June 12, 2003
A YEAR AGO, when the military junta illegally controlling Myanmar last released its democratically elected leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, from house arrest, the generals promised a dialogue aimed at national reconciliation. True dialogue in the nation once known as Burma would lead to a decided weakening, if not the total loss, of the generals' power, so that hasn't happened. And as of yesterday, Ms. Suu Kyi, a Nobel Peace Prize laureate, remained back in detention after a violent government attack late last month on her and her supporters - and even after a United Nations envoy spent days trying to gain her release.
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