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Kweisi Mfume

NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN and ANDREW A. GREEN,SUN REPORTER | August 12, 2006
An Anne Arundel County circuit judge ruled yesterday that the General Assembly's plan to allow voters to cast ballots in the week before Election Day is unconstitutional, a victory for the governor, who has made opposition to early voting a central issue in the fall campaign. Judge Ronald A. Silkworth ruled that the General Assembly's plan violated the clear language of the Maryland Constitution, which says that citizens may vote in their local election districts on a specific day, the Tuesday after the first Monday in November.
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NEWS
By JENNIFER SKALKA AND SUMATHI REDDY and JENNIFER SKALKA AND SUMATHI REDDY,SUN REPORTERS | June 17, 2006
Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele has remained largely silent during the electric rates debate that has dominated Maryland politics for the past three months, while attempting to cast himself as an independent thinker. Since declaring his bid for U.S. Senate, he has rarely mentioned his Republican affiliation, avoided a recent state party fundraiser featuring President Bush, and even showed up yesterday at campaign breakfast for a prominent Democrat, Rep. Albert R. Wynn. But yesterday, Steele's aides said he would be at Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s side Tuesday during a public hearing called by the governor to criticize the General Assembly's rates relief bill and to gauge support for a veto, though both houses passed the measure with veto-proof majorities.
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE and JOHN FRITZE,SUN REPORTER | April 13, 2006
Two leading candidates for U.S. Senate are expected to post comparable fundraising totals for the first three months of this year in a race that is likely to require record spending, campaign officials said yesterday. Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele, a Republican, will report having nearly $1.8 million in the bank at the end of the first quarter, compared with Democratic Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin's $2.6 million on hand, the campaigns said. The quarterly campaign finance reports, which are due at the Federal Election Commission this weekend, will show that Steele has out-raised Cardin this year - $1.3 million to the Democrat's $950,000.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Andrew A. Green and David Nitkin and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2005
Senate hopeful Kweisi Mfume said yesterday that unnamed Democratic Party "operatives" were trying to block his nomination by orchestrating which candidates ran against him, and he said the party risked losing traditional support from black voters as a result. "I think there may be some Democratic operatives in and out of the official party that would like to guide the process, much like they have guided other processes in the past," Mfume said in an interview last night. The party, he said, could lose its long-standing support from minority groups if leaders actively work against the candidacy of a prominent black politician, he said.
NEWS
June 18, 2005
An article in Thursday's editions of The Sun said that Kweisi Mfume was forced to resign as president and chief executive officer of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Sources within the NAACP leadership have described his departure that way. Mfume and an NAACP spokesman have said that Mfume left the organization voluntarily.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and William Patalon III and Kelly Brewington and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2005
CLARIFICATION An article in Thursday's editions of The Sun said that Kweisi Mfume was forced to resign as president and chief executive officer of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Sources within the NAACP leadership have described his departure that way. Mfume and an NAACP spokesman have said that Mfume left the organization voluntarily. Throughout its nearly 100-year history, the NAACP has chosen charismatic public figures to lead the nation's oldest civil rights group: social activists, ministers and political leaders.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Andrew A. Green and David Nitkin and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2005
Kweisi Mfume's bid for the U.S. Senate has not been mortally wounded by reports of sexual harassment and favoritism under his watch at the NAACP, political experts said yesterday. The accusations might undermine Mfume's ability to raise money and reach out to voters beyond his historic base of support in the Baltimore area, experts said. But the campaign could suffer fatal damage, they said, if additional revelations emerge. "If there is nothing new- and this is the end of it -then depending on how effective his campaign team is, he can possibly survive it," said Julius Henson, a longtime Baltimore campaign strategist schooled in the art of bare-knuckle urban politics.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2005
Kweisi Mfume sat alone at the back of the room yesterday morning, scribbling remarks he was about to deliver at a Big Brothers Big Sisters promotion at a Baltimore museum. There were no handlers to keep crowds away from the candidate for Senate. No entourage to rebuff the fresh allegations - which he denies - about nepotism and a hostile work environment at the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, where he was president. Mfume did not mention his candidacy during the event about mentors for children of imprisoned parents, which he emceed.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2005
Allegations that Kweisi Mfume promoted women at the NAACP based on personal relationships with them could harm his fledgling campaign for Senate, political experts and several allies said yesterday. "I think it is damaging," said Del. Curt Anderson, a Baltimore Democrat and longtime supporter of the former Baltimore congressman. "Any time you are unfair or show favoritism, that is a general knock against a person's ability to do a good job as an elected official." Mfume, who resigned late last year as president of the national civil rights group, has denied the charges, first reported yesterday in The Washington Post.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 15, 2005
ON THE WAY to see Kweisi Mfume yesterday, I drove through the lower end of Park Heights Avenue just to let my eyeballs bleed. Mfume was announcing his run for the U.S. Senate. Park Heights, from Belvedere Avenue to Park Circle, was announcing its usual catastrophes: burned-out buildings, abandoned homes and drug traffic that has sparked 30 years of murderous street crime. Mfume reminds us of individual triumph over such troubles, as well as their enduring hold on entire neighborhoods. He runs for the Senate with his life already a remarkable story of human redemption.
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