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Kweisi Mfume

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By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Staff Writer | February 10, 1993
Maryland's nimble 7th District congressman, Kweisi Mfume, has figured out one way to handle talk show democracy.Join it.L Move over Rush, Montel, Phil and Oprah, make way for Kweisi.Mr. Mfume now presides over "The Bottom Line," an issues-oriented television program featuring a panel of experts and a participatory, in-studio audience of 80 or so.In his first four outings, Mr. Mfume has tackled topics such as guns, abortion, and the contraceptive Norplant and its use among teen-agers.The show, which airs at 11 a.m. Sundays, is watched by about 50,000 Baltimore-area viewers, says WBAL-TV producer Terry Todesco.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
A man was shot multiple times Tuesday night in Turner Station, Baltimore County police said. Police were called at 11:45 p.m. to the 100 block of Kweisi Mfume Ct. where they found a man in an alley suffering from multiple gunshot wounds to his lower body. He was taken to a local hospital for treatment, but police did not know his current condition Wednesday. Police said the suspect fled the scene. The department's violent crimes unit is investigating. Anyone with information on the shooting may call police at 410-307-2020.
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FEATURES
September 24, 1994
Rep. Kweisi Mfume, the Baltimore Democrat who is chairman of the congressional Black Caucus, will be the lead story tomorrow night on CBS' "60 Minutes," which airs at 7 p.m. on WBAL (Channel 11)."The piece is titled 'The New Black Power,' and it looks at the congressional Black Caucus through a profile and interview with Kweisi Mfume," CBS's Roy Brunette said yesterday.The segment, which is scheduled to run during the first 15 minutes of the show, is reported by Steve Kroft and includes interviews conducted this week in Baltimore, "with Kroft and Mfume walking the streets where the congressman grew up,"` Mr. Brunette said.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2012
Kweisi Mfume, the former Maryland congressman and NAACP leader, endorsed Sen. Ben Cardin on Friday for a second term, backing his one-time rival. Mfume is the latest prominent black leader in the state to announce support for Cardin, who lost Baltimore city and Prince George's County in his 2006 primary against Mfume. Cardin secured an endorsement from Prince George's County Executive Rushern Baker earlier this week, and already has the backing of Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | January 27, 2002
KWEISI Mfume, race hustler? According to some e-mailers, he is. Mfume, they say, is right up there with the Revvums Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton and Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan as America's leading race hustlers. Maybe attacking "race hustlers" sounds better if they're attacked four at a time, as opposed to three at a time. Jackson, Sharpton and Farrakhan seem to be the top three who arouse the dudgeon of some white Americans. The trio, whatever their faults, fill a need some white Americans have to hate somebody black.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | December 14, 1995
When he was growing up around West Baltimore's Robert and Division streets, anxious and angry and out of control, Kweisi Mfume always knew about an organization called the NAACP, whose national leadership he is about to assume.The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People was the great godsend to black people searching for white America's conscience. It was Clarence Mitchell and Lillie Mae Jackson, whose faces humanized the civil rights struggle throughout Mfume's neighborhood.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Staff Writer | August 1, 1993
After the rush-hour commute to Baltimore for the Friday night taping of his TV talk show, Kweisi Mfume splashes cold water onto his face, washing away the arched-brow gravitas of the Washington player who has met with the president, wrangled over the budget package and worked the levers of the town all week.On this night, with the Baltimore County school superintendent as his guest, he is a loose and affable TV personality, a regular Phil Donahue in a better suit. But his remarkable political rise and clear-eyed ambition are never far from the surface.
NEWS
February 16, 1996
PAT SCHROEDER, Norman Mineta, Tom Bevill. In all, 20 Democrats have decided the Republican takeover of the House means it's time for them to move on. The result could be a firmer hold on the reins of power by the Republican majority. The liberal Democrat likely to replace Kweisi Mfume is in for some rough times.It will take an exceptional person to take on this job. Mr. Mfume had the benefit of Democratic leadership during most of his five House terms. But as Congress changed, so did he, from a --iki-wearing activist to a tailored-suit conciliator able to gain praise even from conservative House Speaker New Gingrich.
NEWS
May 5, 1999
IT'S NOT as though Kweisi Mfume couldn't reasonably be expected to know better.The former City Council member, former member of the U.S. House of Representatives and current chief executive of the nation's oldest and largest civil rights organization should know a thing or two about voting.Common sense suggests Mr. Mfume would understand what political boundaries are. His electoral successes, thus far, have been in running for offices that represent the people of a specific district. He wasn't elected at large to Congress or the council but by voters living within a specific area.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 15, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Kweisi Mfume used to run away from it. All of it. All of the litter and mess from his past that had nothing to do with his life now within the stately halls of Congress.Dropping out of school. Shooting craps and swigging wine from a bottle on a street corner in West Baltimore. Fathering five sons, as he says, "before my time.""I didn't think there was much inspiration there," says the Democratic congressman from Baltimore, sitting in his Capitol Hill office and reflecting on his past.
NEWS
By Kweisi Mfume | August 15, 2011
When we think of the technological advances of the past 20 years, one in particular will probably come to mind for most Americans: wireless technology, which now enables us to access the Internet from anywhere. But when most Americans think of the top uses for the wireless Internet, health care is probably not the first thing on that list. Perhaps, in the near future, it will be. The current revolution in medicine will use the full potential of technology to transform medical practice to save lives and improve health.
NEWS
December 30, 2007
Born Frizzell Gray, Baltimore native Kweisi Mfume began his career as a political activist, first elected to the Baltimore City Council in 1979. After two terms on the council, in 1986, the Democrat was elected to the House of Representatives and went on to serve as the congressman from Maryland's 7th District for five terms. From 1996 to 2004 he was president and CEO of the Baltimore-based National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Since a failed bid for the Senate in 2006, Mfume has toured the country on public speaking engagements.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | September 7, 2007
It is quiet at Equinox Hair in West Baltimore on a recent weekend morning. The only customers, Quinn Cokley and his two boys, are rotating between a couch along the wall and the barber's chair. No one smiles when Sheila Dixon walks in. The mayor introduces herself, and Cokley quietly -- gently, even -- begins asking tough questions. He notes that many residents have put their children in public schools against their better judgment. He wants to know what Dixon has done to improve education and, more importantly, what she's going to do if elected.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | June 6, 2007
They came in droves to pay tribute yesterday to a man they lauded as a civil rights pioneer, mentor and uncompromising activist for social justice. And together, the political dignitaries, civic leaders and family members made one promise: The legacy of Parren J. Mitchell will live on. Mitchell, who died May 28 of complications from pneumonia, was remembered during a four-hour memorial service at West Baltimore's cavernous St. James Episcopal Church for...
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun Reporter | February 1, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin added his support yesterday to a measure that would make it a federal crime to distribute campaign literature that makes false claims about political endorsements -- an issue that came up during his campaign last fall. Maryland Democrats say brochures sponsored in part by the campaign of Michael S. Steele -- Cardin's Republican opponent for the Senate in the November election -- were designed to mislead African-American voters about Steele's party affiliation and his support from prominent black leaders.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | December 10, 2006
The "draft Mfume" movement is gaining momentum - and the draftee is not resisting. The former Baltimore congressman, Kweisi Mfume, has politely deflected the incessant questions about whether he might run for mayor next year. His friend, Council President Sheila Dixon, becomes mayor automatically when Martin O'Malley leaves the mayor's office in January to become governor. In recent days, Mr. Mfume says, people are all but chanting "Run, Kweisi, run." Last Tuesday evening, he arrived at a meeting of the Baltimore BLEWS, the local Black/Jewish Forum, to echoes of that same clamor.
NEWS
February 22, 1996
THE CIVIL RIGHTS organization that Kweisi Mfume took over Tuesday is going to change considerably under his direction. That was clear in remarks he made during swearing-in ceremonies attended by both the president and vice president of the United States. Not only did the new NAACP president criticize far-right policies that "punish the elderly, restrict the poor and deny opportunity to our children," he acknowledged the damage done by liberal policies whose sole objective has been maintenance of the poor.
NEWS
February 18, 1996
THOUGH REDISTRICTING has spread Maryland's 7th Congressional District well into suburban Baltimore County, its core is in those areas of inner-city Baltimore that struggle daily against crime, poor schools and the lack of opportunity to retain some semblance of better days.This is a historic district. In 1970, it sent to Washington Maryland's first black member of Congress -- Parren J. Mitchell. Kweisi Mfume succeeded Mr. Mitchell in 1986 and easily won re-election five times.The seat is now open, due to Mr. Mfume's decision to take over the financially struggling National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun Reporter | November 14, 2006
City Council President Sheila Dixon has more money on hand for a 2007 mayoral campaign than nearly a dozen other potential candidates combined - meaning that Dixon may have an edge in fundraising on top of the advantage she is guaranteed by incumbency. Though the primary is still 9 1/2 months away - and fundraising for the mayor's race is not expected to get under way in earnest until January - Dixon has amassed a significant treasury of $278,000, more than double that of the next-best-funded candidate.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | November 8, 2006
The many Democrats who admire him and who voted for him in the September primary might have wondered what happened to Kweisi Mfume during the past couple of months. He conceded defeat to Ben Cardin after a narrow loss, then seemed to disappear. "Ben and I gave this race our best," Mfume said. "However, there can only be one nominee from our party, and he is it. He's a great public servant, and I have absolutely no doubt that he is going to make a terrific United States senator. He has my full support."
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