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NEWS
March 22, 1994
The proclamation of independence for KwaZulu by King Goodwill Zwelethini is a dread omen for his Zulu people. It is saying that the April 26-28 election in South Africa will not apply to KwaZulu, and that the king is not willing to live in a South Africa governed largely by the African National Congress (ANC).This comes as the king's kinsman, Prime Minister Mangosuthu Buthelezi, head of the Inkatha Freedom Party, is the last major black holdout against the election and against the great national settlement hatched largely by the ANC's Nelson Mandela and white South Africa's President F. W. de Klerk.
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NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | April 30, 1994
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Partisan rhetoric cooled down yesterday as South Africa ended four days of voting in its first nonracial election.Though the air had been full of charges of electoral improprieties from almost every political party, an added day of voting in several rural sections of the country seemed to take care of most of the objections.In the first two days of general voting, many of those areas received few ballots and were missing other equipment,frustrating would-be voters.
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NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | April 30, 1994
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Partisan rhetoric cooled down yesterday as South Africa ended four days of voting in its first nonracial election.Though the air had been full of charges of electoral improprieties from almost every political party, an added day of voting in several rural sections of the country seemed to take care of most of the objections.In the first two days of general voting, many of those areas received few ballots and were missing other equipment,frustrating would-be voters.
NEWS
March 22, 1994
The proclamation of independence for KwaZulu by King Goodwill Zwelethini is a dread omen for his Zulu people. It is saying that the April 26-28 election in South Africa will not apply to KwaZulu, and that the king is not willing to live in a South Africa governed largely by the African National Congress (ANC).This comes as the king's kinsman, Prime Minister Mangosuthu Buthelezi, head of the Inkatha Freedom Party, is the last major black holdout against the election and against the great national settlement hatched largely by the ANC's Nelson Mandela and white South Africa's President F. W. de Klerk.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | March 19, 1994
PRETORIA, South Africa -- Top South African Police officials have armed and aided the Inkatha Freedom Party in its war against the African National Congress (ANC), a commission investigating violence in this country reported yesterday.According to testimony gathered by the prestigious Goldstone Commission, three generals in the South African Police were among those involved in gun running, weapons manufacture and political hit squads, as well as organizing violence in hostels and on trains, for at least the last four years.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau | December 15, 1993
CAPE TOWN, South Africa -- The Transitional Executive Council (TEC) has set up a confrontation over one of the thorniest issues bedeviling the creation of a new South Africa -- the power of the central government over the semi-independent homelands.At its third meeting yesterday, the TEC took on these apartheid creations, designed to take South African citizenship away from blacks by making them citizens of tribal homelands.The leaders of three of these homelands, facing the loss of their power and patronage, pulled out of the negotiations that wrote the country's new constitution and set up the TEC as a super-advisory body to the government leading up to the first nonracial elections on April 27.Though current proposals call for homeland residents to regain South African citizenship Jan. 1 and for the homelands to cease to exist after the election, some homeland leaders claim that their "independence" means that these laws do not apply within their borders.
NEWS
March 16, 1994
The brutal small civil war fought out in the streets of dusty little Mmabatho in recent days moved South Africa closer to a successful election leading to majority rule.The town is the capital of some noncontiguous black islands in northern South Africa that supposedly were set free in 1977 as the black homeland of Bophuthatswana. It was a sham, but the despotic "president," Lucas Mangope, liked his authority and determined not to allow his homeland to be reincorporated into South Africa, not to allow the election to be held and not to allow the African National Congress of Nelson Mandela to campaign.
NEWS
March 29, 1994
Zulu defiance of the constitutional settlement threatens to tear South Africa apart. It is a monster that the white National Party government helped create by arming and training Zulu fighters to undermine the African National Congress and by creating such spurious homelands as KwaZulu, giving power and a stake in perpetuating apartheid to black leaders there.Most of the homelands are succumbing to the fact of their own fiction, and the certainty of being taken into one South Africa after the April 26-28 election.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | March 26, 1994
DURBAN, South Africa -- The battle for Natal, which has led to an increasing amount of bloodshed in black townships over the last week, took to the streets of this coastal city yesterday with a huge, peaceful, display of support for the African National Congress (ANC).An estimated 50,000 marchers gathered here in the first of what ANC officials say will be a series of actions in response to the threats of Mangosuthu Buthelezi's Inkatha Freedom Party to resist violently any attempt to hold the election April 26-28 in Natal.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | March 31, 1994
ULUNDI, South Africa -- Mangosuthu Buthelezi -- the Zulu chief who opposed both apartheid and trade sanctions -- was once praised as the black who would save South Africa from communist domination. Now he is denounced as the obstructionist who could drag it into civil war.The four weeks remaining between now and South Africa's first multiracial elections will tell whether he is reduced to a historical footnote. He and his Inkatha Freedom Party are boycotting the vote, certain to be won by his avowed enemy, Nelson Mandela's African National Congress (ANC)
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | March 19, 1994
PRETORIA, South Africa -- Top South African Police officials have armed and aided the Inkatha Freedom Party in its war against the African National Congress (ANC), a commission investigating violence in this country reported yesterday.According to testimony gathered by the prestigious Goldstone Commission, three generals in the South African Police were among those involved in gun running, weapons manufacture and political hit squads, as well as organizing violence in hostels and on trains, for at least the last four years.
NEWS
March 16, 1994
The brutal small civil war fought out in the streets of dusty little Mmabatho in recent days moved South Africa closer to a successful election leading to majority rule.The town is the capital of some noncontiguous black islands in northern South Africa that supposedly were set free in 1977 as the black homeland of Bophuthatswana. It was a sham, but the despotic "president," Lucas Mangope, liked his authority and determined not to allow his homeland to be reincorporated into South Africa, not to allow the election to be held and not to allow the African National Congress of Nelson Mandela to campaign.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau | December 15, 1993
CAPE TOWN, South Africa -- The Transitional Executive Council (TEC) has set up a confrontation over one of the thorniest issues bedeviling the creation of a new South Africa -- the power of the central government over the semi-independent homelands.At its third meeting yesterday, the TEC took on these apartheid creations, designed to take South African citizenship away from blacks by making them citizens of tribal homelands.The leaders of three of these homelands, facing the loss of their power and patronage, pulled out of the negotiations that wrote the country's new constitution and set up the TEC as a super-advisory body to the government leading up to the first nonracial elections on April 27.Though current proposals call for homeland residents to regain South African citizenship Jan. 1 and for the homelands to cease to exist after the election, some homeland leaders claim that their "independence" means that these laws do not apply within their borders.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | September 22, 1990
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- After weeks of blaming each other for the outbreak of fighting between their followers, black nationalist leader Nelson Mandela and Zulu Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi plan to meet next month to discuss the violence plaguing black townships.But the Oct. 5 meeting will not be the one-on-one affair that MrButhelezi has sought with Mr. Mandela ever since the African National Congress deputy president was released from prison in February. Instead, the ANC has invited Mr. Buthelezi to a meeting that will include leaders of all 10 of South Africa's tribal homelands.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | September 16, 1990
ULUNDI, South Africa -- Mangosuthu Buthelezi becomes visibly annoyed at the suggestion that he might enhance his stature by rubbing shoulders with Nelson Mandela.He waves his arms. He locks his fingers and twiddles his thumbs. He twists around in his chair. And he dismisses the suggestion with colorful terms like "balder--," "rubbish" and "crap."Mr. Buthelezi is a prince of the Zulu tribe, which once reigned supreme in southern Africa, and he speaks proudly of the "warrior blood in our veins."
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