Advertisement
HomeCollectionsKwasniewski
IN THE NEWS

Kwasniewski

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 19, 1995
WARSAW, Poland -- On an election swing into the Polish countryside imitating Bill Clinton's 1992 campaign bus trip, Alexander Kwasniewski's arm gestures seemed remarkably Clintonesque.It turned out that Mr. Kwasniewski, the Polish presidential contender and former Communist, not only borrowed the idea of the bus but knowingly copied President Clinton's body language."It's not precisely the Clinton style, but we have adapted it to the Polish conditions," said Zbigniew Siemiatkowski, the campaign press secretary, who returned from a visit to the United States this year with a suitcase full of presidential debate tapes from Kennedy-Nixon through Bush-Clinton-Perot for Mr. Kwasniewski.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 3, 2004
AS THE PROSPECTS for a sensible solution to the Ukrainian election crisis increase, so too does the emphasis on face-saving. Outgoing President Leonid D. Kuchma zigs and zags; yesterday he flew unexpectedly to Moscow, to meet his hard-line backer, President Vladimir V. Putin, but it's becoming evident that he's quite prepared to throw his hand-picked successor, Viktor F. Yanukovych, overboard if need be. Mr. Yanukovych, declared the winner of an unsavory...
Advertisement
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 12, 1995
WARSAW, Poland -- In classrooms and on campuses, in living rooms and workplaces, a week before the presidential runoff election young Poles are saying: Forget their favorite candidate's Communist past. He is, many of them argue, the force for the future.Many first-time voters in next Sunday's election say they will choose Aleksander Kwasniewski, 40, a telegenic former Communist, because as a man who speaks English and knows some economics, he is a modern man.Lech Walesa, 52, who as leader of the Solidarity labor movement cracked the Communist system and who has been president for five years, is an emblem of history and should remain that way, they assert.
NEWS
By Tom Hundley and Tom Hundley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 9, 2003
WARSAW - In a weekend referendum, Poles voted overwhelmingly in favor of joining the European Union but needed a second-day surge in voter turnout to push past the 50 percent threshold necessary to make the result binding. Exit polls showed 81.7 percent in favor of joining the EU and 18.3 percent opposed. But the critical number was the 58.8 percent turnout. On Saturday, Polish and EU officials were alarmed by the low turnout: Only 17.6 percent of the electorate cast ballots on the first day of the referendum.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 21, 1995
WARSAW, Poland -- The undoing of a living legend with the historical stature of Polish President Lech Walesa comes rarely in politics.But for all the emotion surrounding Mr. Walesa's election defeat Sunday, there was little fear yesterday that his successor would veer the country from the democratic and economic reforms Mr. Walesa toiled to secure."
NEWS
By Elizabeth Pond | January 19, 1996
BONN -- Alexander Kwasniewski's visit to Germany last week and to NATO this week illustrates three axioms of the new Europe.First, the starting point of any European country's foreign policy has to be good relations with the continent's powerhouse. Bonn and Berlin were the first ports of call of the new Polish president, less than a month after his inauguration.Second, the election of ex-Communists like Mr. Kwasniewski in Central Europe (Russia is different) demonstrates the conversion Communists to capitalism, not the reversion of capitalism to central planning.
NEWS
November 3, 1995
LECH WALESA AND his Solidarity movement played such an epic role in the collapse of the Soviet empire that Poland's presidential elections Sunday will be watched closely throughout the world. No fewer than 13 candidates are seeking the chief executive's office, but the only ones likely to get through the first round are Mr. Walesa himself and Aleksander Kwasniewski, a former communist official who is now campaigning as a Social Democrat.That Mr. Walesa is even regarded as a finalist shows how this one-time shipyard electrician should never be underestimated.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 1995
WARSAW, Poland -- Fighting for a second term as president, Lech Walesa staged a remarkable comeback in the first round of the election yesterday, gaining enough votes to face a former Communist in a runoff, surveys of voters leaving the polls showed.Mr. Walesa, who trailed so badly several months ago that many Poles were writing his political obituary, was just behind Aleksander Kwasniewski, the surveys indicated. The Polish state television reported Mr. Kwasniewski with 34 percent of the vote and Mr. Walesa with 33.2 percent.
NEWS
November 28, 1995
POLAND'S POWERFUL Roman Catholic church took a big gamble in recent presidential elections. It did everything it could to assure the re-election of Lech Walesa, the Solidarity labor movement hero and a practicing Catholic. About the best thing Cardinal Jozef Glemp, the head of Poland's church, managed to say about the opponent, Aleksandr Kwasniewski, was that the former communist advocated "neo-pagan values.""Leftist politicians do not respect the people," Archbishop Ignacy Tokarczuk declared in a sermon to 150,000 pilgrims before the election.
NEWS
By Tom Hundley and Tom Hundley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 9, 2003
WARSAW - In a weekend referendum, Poles voted overwhelmingly in favor of joining the European Union but needed a second-day surge in voter turnout to push past the 50 percent threshold necessary to make the result binding. Exit polls showed 81.7 percent in favor of joining the EU and 18.3 percent opposed. But the critical number was the 58.8 percent turnout. On Saturday, Polish and EU officials were alarmed by the low turnout: Only 17.6 percent of the electorate cast ballots on the first day of the referendum.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 1, 1997
WROCLAW, Poland -- On a cold, wet day, Pope John Paul II returned to Poland yesterday and expressed pleasure at being back "under the roof of the parental home" where he said even the smallest details and objects recalled what was most precious to him. Even the weather, he noted in a smiling, unscripted aside, was familiar."
NEWS
January 26, 1996
FREE MARKET REFORMS have been an economic success in Poland but a political liability. They brought victory in 1993 parliamentary elections to a coalition of former Communists and collaborators. Last March, the former Communist Jozef Oleksy became prime minister. He was poised to become even more powerful after a former Communist ally, Aleksander Kwasniewski, was elected president in November, ousting the anti-Communist Lech Walesa.Instead, Mr. Oleksy has announced his resignation to fight charges of having been a Soviet and Russian spy up to last year.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Pond | January 19, 1996
BONN -- Alexander Kwasniewski's visit to Germany last week and to NATO this week illustrates three axioms of the new Europe.First, the starting point of any European country's foreign policy has to be good relations with the continent's powerhouse. Bonn and Berlin were the first ports of call of the new Polish president, less than a month after his inauguration.Second, the election of ex-Communists like Mr. Kwasniewski in Central Europe (Russia is different) demonstrates the conversion Communists to capitalism, not the reversion of capitalism to central planning.
NEWS
November 28, 1995
POLAND'S POWERFUL Roman Catholic church took a big gamble in recent presidential elections. It did everything it could to assure the re-election of Lech Walesa, the Solidarity labor movement hero and a practicing Catholic. About the best thing Cardinal Jozef Glemp, the head of Poland's church, managed to say about the opponent, Aleksandr Kwasniewski, was that the former communist advocated "neo-pagan values.""Leftist politicians do not respect the people," Archbishop Ignacy Tokarczuk declared in a sermon to 150,000 pilgrims before the election.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 21, 1995
WARSAW, Poland -- The undoing of a living legend with the historical stature of Polish President Lech Walesa comes rarely in politics.But for all the emotion surrounding Mr. Walesa's election defeat Sunday, there was little fear yesterday that his successor would veer the country from the democratic and economic reforms Mr. Walesa toiled to secure."
NEWS
November 21, 1995
PRESIDENT LECH WALESA'S narrow defeat Sunday in the run-off election for president of Poland was not unexpected. Although the hero of the Solidarity labor union had staged a surprising comeback, he simply could not regain the popularity he had lost in his five years as his country's first post-communist leader.As Aleksander Kwasniewski takes over as Poland's new chief executive, the former communist cabinet minister faces a difficult task convincing his badly divided country that he can implement the Western-style social democratic platform on which he campaigned.
NEWS
November 21, 1995
PRESIDENT LECH WALESA'S narrow defeat Sunday in the run-off election for president of Poland was not unexpected. Although the hero of the Solidarity labor union had staged a surprising comeback, he simply could not regain the popularity he had lost in his five years as his country's first post-communist leader.As Aleksander Kwasniewski takes over as Poland's new chief executive, the former communist cabinet minister faces a difficult task convincing his badly divided country that he can implement the Western-style social democratic platform on which he campaigned.
NEWS
January 26, 1996
FREE MARKET REFORMS have been an economic success in Poland but a political liability. They brought victory in 1993 parliamentary elections to a coalition of former Communists and collaborators. Last March, the former Communist Jozef Oleksy became prime minister. He was poised to become even more powerful after a former Communist ally, Aleksander Kwasniewski, was elected president in November, ousting the anti-Communist Lech Walesa.Instead, Mr. Oleksy has announced his resignation to fight charges of having been a Soviet and Russian spy up to last year.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 19, 1995
WARSAW, Poland -- On an election swing into the Polish countryside imitating Bill Clinton's 1992 campaign bus trip, Alexander Kwasniewski's arm gestures seemed remarkably Clintonesque.It turned out that Mr. Kwasniewski, the Polish presidential contender and former Communist, not only borrowed the idea of the bus but knowingly copied President Clinton's body language."It's not precisely the Clinton style, but we have adapted it to the Polish conditions," said Zbigniew Siemiatkowski, the campaign press secretary, who returned from a visit to the United States this year with a suitcase full of presidential debate tapes from Kennedy-Nixon through Bush-Clinton-Perot for Mr. Kwasniewski.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 12, 1995
WARSAW, Poland -- In classrooms and on campuses, in living rooms and workplaces, a week before the presidential runoff election young Poles are saying: Forget their favorite candidate's Communist past. He is, many of them argue, the force for the future.Many first-time voters in next Sunday's election say they will choose Aleksander Kwasniewski, 40, a telegenic former Communist, because as a man who speaks English and knows some economics, he is a modern man.Lech Walesa, 52, who as leader of the Solidarity labor movement cracked the Communist system and who has been president for five years, is an emblem of history and should remain that way, they assert.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.