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By a Sun Staff Correspondent | March 22, 1991
KUWAIT CITY -- The government announced yesterday that electric power had been restored to nearly one-third of Kuwait City, but the government's spokesman remained in the dark.A tour through the neighborhoods in which the government claimed power had been restored found them still without electricity. "It came on for about 45 minutes and then went off," said Mohamud Al-Jumal, a teacher in one of the neighborhoods.In other neighborhoods, residents said the power remained on for nearly two hours but then cut off.A government spokesman had no explanation for the confusion.
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By Dan Fesperman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
The Saudi lieutenant shouted an order in Arabic. Two dozen of his men, frenzied and hollering, lowered their weapons and backed away from an encircled knot of prisoners. Kneeling at the center of this commotion in the Kuwaiti desert were 10 unarmed Iraqi soldiers with their hands on their heads. Some were in tears. Some were praying. Some were pleading for mercy. "Who brought these prisoners?" the lieutenant asked. One of his men turned and pointed at us - freelancer Michael Kelly and me - a scruffy pair of scribblers armed only with notebooks, granola bars and a beat-up Nissan Safari.
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NEWS
By Sara Fritz and Sara Fritz,Los Angeles Times | June 4, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Kuwaiti government paid more than $66,000 to fly Secretary of Commerce Robert A. Mosbacher Sr., his wife and aides to Kuwait City in early March to view the destruction of that country in the aftermath of the Persian Gulf war, according to reports made public yesterday.The trip to Kuwait was just one of more than 30 trips -- both foreign and domestic -- that Mr. Mosbacher has taken over the past 2 1/2 years at the expense of foreign governments or U.S. corporations.Although President Bush persuaded Congress two years ago to permit all top administration officials to travel at the expense of private corporations, Mr. Mosbacher, a multimillionaire, far exceeds any other Cabinet officer in using this privilege.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 15, 2003
KUWAIT CITY - A swift war has handed Jay Garner, the retired American general charged with rebuilding Iraq, a rare and daunting opportunity: to create a new state, from government ministries and police forces to money and television stations. It is a race against the clock, Garner acknowledges, against the forces of anarchy that are sapping Iraq and the growing resentment against Americans who have ridded the nation of President Saddam Hussein but left nothing, so far, in his place. "If you are absent too long, while expectations are created for our government, our people and the Iraqi people, then a vacuum occurs," Garner said yesterday.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 23, 2003
KUWAIT CITY - An Australian cameraman was killed covering the war in Iraq yesterday and at least six other journalists were missing or hiding from Iraqi soldiers and seeking rescue by Marines, according to military officials and news organizations. The cameraman was killed by an apparent car bomb at a checkpoint near a camp of the militant group Ansar al-Islam in northern Iraq. At least eight other people there were injured. The journalist was Paul Moran, 39, a free-lance cameraman with the Australian Broadcasting Corp.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 15, 2003
KUWAIT CITY - A swift war has handed Jay Garner, the retired American general charged with rebuilding Iraq, a rare and daunting opportunity: to create a new state, from government ministries and police forces to money and television stations. It is a race against the clock, Garner acknowledges, against the forces of anarchy that are sapping Iraq and the growing resentment against Americans who have ridded the nation of President Saddam Hussein but left nothing, so far, in his place. "If you are absent too long, while expectations are created for our government, our people and the Iraqi people, then a vacuum occurs," Garner said yesterday.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 31, 1992
KUWAIT CITY -- Iran has decided to expropriate 132 military and civilian Iraqi planes that sought refuge in several Iranian cities in the final phase of the Persian Gulf war to escape destruction at the hands of allied forces last year, Saudi and Kuwaiti officials here say.The number of the Iraqi planes is much larger than reported earlier, when accounts put the number at 60, including Russian-made MiG fighters and Sukhoi bombers as well as several European-made...
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 28, 1991
KUWAIT CITY -- Barely 18 hours after exchanging gunfire with Iraqi soldiers, Abdel Mohammed raced through the city firing his automatic rifle to celebrate the liberation of Kuwait, ignoring the gunshot wound in his left foot.The Kuwaiti resistance fighter rejoiced with soldiers from the Kuwaiti and Saudi armies, which rolled into the city to proclaim victory over the Iraqi military forces that had virtually destroyed Kuwait's oil economy during a brutal seven-month occupation.Young men hung out of car windows firing their guns, while other Kuwaitis embraced or gathered with friends to wrap themselves in their country's flag.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 19, 1991
KUWAIT CITY -- The man wore only dirty white boxer shorts. His black pants were used to tie his hands behind him. His pink shirt was used as a blindfold. Nothing covered the black bruises on his muscular arms or the crudely stitched gash in his forehead.But sometime early Sunday, he was taken to an underpass on the Magreb Highway, the capital's main artery, and forced to kneel. Then he was shot in the head, left shoulder and chest, and propped upright for passing traffic to see, bullet holes and blood in the baby-blue wall behind him."
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 11, 1991
KUWAIT CITY -- Army Reserve Lt. Col. Jeffrey Greenhut of Olney, Md., expected to see damage when he got to Kuwait City, but this was worse than he thought."
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 23, 2003
KUWAIT CITY - U.S. officials from President Bush on down have cautioned that war with Iraq could be difficult, and there was growing evidence yesterday that American and British troops, at least in some pockets of fighting, are facing more resistance than military planners expected. The glimpses of war as seen on television and in newspaper stories carrying Iraq datelines offer a view of the war mostly in narrow slices - what a camera on a hotel roof can capture of the bombing of Baghdad, what reporters traveling with troops can see in an extremely limited field of view.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 23, 2003
KUWAIT CITY - An Australian cameraman was killed covering the war in Iraq yesterday and at least six other journalists were missing or hiding from Iraqi soldiers and seeking rescue by Marines, according to military officials and news organizations. The cameraman was killed by an apparent car bomb at a checkpoint near a camp of the militant group Ansar al-Islam in northern Iraq. At least eight other people there were injured. The journalist was Paul Moran, 39, a free-lance cameraman with the Australian Broadcasting Corp.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 25, 2003
KUWAIT CITY, Kuwait - It's after midnight, but the dozen men of the Sabah al-Salem neighborhood gathered in a second-floor banquet room have no plans to go home yet. They order more cups of tea and coffee. They light cigarettes. They prop themselves up on plush crimson pillows. They want to talk more about a possible U.S.-led war against their neighbor, Iraq. A young schoolteacher opposed to war asks how an Iraqi family would feel if U.S. soldiers accidentally killed an innocent son or daughter during an attack.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 31, 1992
KUWAIT CITY -- Iran has decided to expropriate 132 military and civilian Iraqi planes that sought refuge in several Iranian cities in the final phase of the Persian Gulf war to escape destruction at the hands of allied forces last year, Saudi and Kuwaiti officials here say.The number of the Iraqi planes is much larger than reported earlier, when accounts put the number at 60, including Russian-made MiG fighters and Sukhoi bombers as well as several European-made...
NEWS
By Patrick L. Hickerson and Patrick L. Hickerson,Staff writer | July 3, 1991
"Imagine being the mayor of New York City and waking up one morning and finding out that there is no food in the city, no water. There's no way for the people to get to work, they can't call in because there's no telephone; no radios, no TVs. Where do you start?"Only through an analogy can Brig. Gen. Howard T. Mooney Jr. of Ellicott City begin to explain the role his soldiers played in Kuwait City during the Persian Gulf war.Mooney, 48, led the 352nd Civil Affairs Command, an Army reserve unit headquartered near College Park.
NEWS
By Sara Fritz and Sara Fritz,Los Angeles Times | June 4, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Kuwaiti government paid more than $66,000 to fly Secretary of Commerce Robert A. Mosbacher Sr., his wife and aides to Kuwait City in early March to view the destruction of that country in the aftermath of the Persian Gulf war, according to reports made public yesterday.The trip to Kuwait was just one of more than 30 trips -- both foreign and domestic -- that Mr. Mosbacher has taken over the past 2 1/2 years at the expense of foreign governments or U.S. corporations.Although President Bush persuaded Congress two years ago to permit all top administration officials to travel at the expense of private corporations, Mr. Mosbacher, a multimillionaire, far exceeds any other Cabinet officer in using this privilege.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 25, 2003
KUWAIT CITY, Kuwait - It's after midnight, but the dozen men of the Sabah al-Salem neighborhood gathered in a second-floor banquet room have no plans to go home yet. They order more cups of tea and coffee. They light cigarettes. They prop themselves up on plush crimson pillows. They want to talk more about a possible U.S.-led war against their neighbor, Iraq. A young schoolteacher opposed to war asks how an Iraqi family would feel if U.S. soldiers accidentally killed an innocent son or daughter during an attack.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 21, 1991
KUWAIT CITY -- The Kuwaiti government has been unable to stop its soldiers and militia from abducting and torturing Palestinians, according to observers and sources here.One source said that at least 600 Palestinians have disappeared since Kuwait was liberated and that at least 12 have been killed. The source said that "discipline in the army is breaking down."U.S. Ambassador Edward W. Gnehm confirmed Tuesday that he gave a list of "several names" of Kuwaiti military men to the government and asked that they be prosecuted for human rights abuses.
NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | May 19, 1991
KUWAIT CITY -- Two teen-age girls smile and wave at soldiers outside the U.S. Embassy from their cherry-red convertible. One is wearing skin-tight jeans, the other a hip-hugging skirt with the hemline above her knees.Madonna's "Like a Virgin" blares from the car's speakers. Draped across the back seat are two abayas, the traditional black robes worn by Arab women. Islamic tradition dictates that women dress modestly.Why are the abayas in the back seat?"To get out of the house," the convertible's driver explains as traffic begins to move.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 26, 1991
KUWAIT CITY -- Electric service began to slowly flicker on in neighborhoods of Kuwait City yesterday, and a weak but steady stream of water dribbled from faucets in some areas.By late last night, large sections of Kuwait City had shed their dark cloak and reassumed the twinkling appearance of a modern city.Streetlights lit up avenues that had been dark and foreboding for about six weeks, since Iraqis sabotaged the power stations before retreating.Some traffic lights blinked on, bringing order to intersections that had become increasingly risky to cross.
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