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By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 27, 1991
SOUTHERN KUWAIT -- They were fed up with the hunger, the cold, the rain and the Iraqi army in general. And the last thing they wanted to do was fight whoever it was that had bombed their trenches for five weeks running.So at midafternoon yesterday, they threw off their helmets, buried their guns in the sand and set out 10 abreast down an empty desert highway. They carried a bamboo pole with a white cloth tied to the end, and they were intent on surrendering to the first person they could find.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
David Chirinos, a former Marine Corps corporal who served in Afghanistan, died of complications from cancer and liver failure Sept. 13 at his Parkville home. He was 27. Born in Miami, he was the son of Rosa Chirinos. He was a graduate of South Ridge High School, where he played varsity volleyball and was team captain. He worked for DirecTV and for a hotel car valet service for a year before enlisting in the Marines in 2009. "He took his volleyball seriously and could jump super high," said a high school classmate, Chris Montero, who lives in Wilmington, N.C. "He was a natural leader, in a spontaneous kind of way. He was never pushy.
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NEWS
June 28, 1991
Kuwait ended an embarrassment when it wound up martial law tribunals of alleged collaborators and commuted 29 death sentences already handed down. U.S. and allied pressure to improve on the human rights front clearly had something to do with that.But that should not be the end of it. Kuwait remains a disappointment to its friends in the aftermath of the gulf war. The return to civilian rule means the armed men on the corner change their army uniforms for police uniforms. It leaves guns in the hands of Kuwaitis, in some cases to use against Palestinian and other guest workers as they please.
SPORTS
By Trevor Hass, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
The General. That's the nickname Taysean Scott earned on the basketball court when he was 7 for his fearless style of play and innate ability to lead. The nickname stuck, and Scott has adopted a similar mentality on the football field. Scott, who grew up in Baltimore and attended McDonogh, is a star cornerback at Williams College. He made a name for himself on the field during his freshman season, starting nearly every game and dominating defensively. Starting in mid-July, though, The General will join a new team: He's part of a 44-man roster that will represent the United States at the 2014 International Federation of American Football Under-19 World Championships in Kuwait.
NEWS
March 14, 1991
By invitation of Kuwaiti officials, Gov. William Donald Schaefer is accompanying the emir of Kuwait on his return to Kuwait City today. Some Maryland lawmakers say Schaefer should tend to business at home.The Evening Sun wants to know what you think about Schaefer's trip.Call SUNDIAL, the Baltimore Sun's telephone information system, on a Touch-Tone phone. The call is local, and answers will be registered between 10 a.m. and midnight. The SUNDIAL phone number is 783-1800 or, in Anne Arundel County, 268-7736.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 27, 1991
GOVERNMENTSince the sheikdom of Kuwait was founded in 1756, it has been ruled, sometimes under British guardianship, by the Sabah family, who were chosen by its first Arab settlers. At the time of the invasion by Iraq on Aug. 2, the emir of Kuwait was Sheik Jaber al-Ahmad al-Sabah, who was head of state, leading a Cabinet with 10 appointed ministers and four elected ones. The constitution, framed in 1962, allowed the vote to literate, native-born Kuwaiti males over 21 years of age whose families had resided in Kuwait since 1920.
NEWS
October 11, 1990
The tragedy on Jerusalem's Temple Mount is no reason to link Iraqi evacuation from Kuwait to Israeli evacuation of the biblical lands of Judea and Samaria. That is what Iraq's dictator Saddam Hussein demanded, to cloud the issue of his total aggression against a friendly, fellow Arab, Islamic state that had been subsidizing him. The linkage is specious and fraudulent. It is a false distraction.Kuwait is not a quid pro quo for the West Bank and Gaza. Kuwait was not a sympathizer of Israel but a supporter of the Palestinians.
NEWS
By John R. MacArthur | January 7, 1992
IN HIS URGENT arguments during the fall and winter of 1990 for military action against Saddam Hussein, President Bush made much of the Iraqi leader's cruelty toward the Kuwaiti people. Bush's allegations of atrocities by Iraqi forces generally went unchallenged. Hussein's violent disposal of dissident Iraqis was a matter of record, so few politicians, journalists or human rights investigators were prepared to question the president's campaign to paint his opponent as Adolf Hitler reborn.Some claims were no doubt true, but the most sensational one -- that Iraqi soldiers removed hundreds of Kuwaiti babies from incubators and left them to die on hospital floors -- was shown to be almost certainly false by an ABC reporter, John Martin, in March 1991, after the liberation of Kuwait.
NEWS
July 29, 1991
Resumption of oil shipments this weekend is the first good news from Kuwait since its liberation by allied troops last February. Nearly half the 600 oil well fires set by Iraqi soldiers are out, with 15 more extinguished each week. Slowly the facilities are being restored.Kuwait's export resumption will start small at 140,000 barrels a day, rising to 400,000 barrels by New Year's, much less than the 2 million barrels daily before Iraq's invasion last August. It nonetheless symbolizes the start of a return to normal, both for the oil industry worldwide and for Kuwait as a city-state with a life and a purpose.
NEWS
By The Los Angeles Times | June 5, 1991
KUWAIT'S ruling al Sabah family was notably generous with its political promises after it was driven into exile last August by Iraq's invasion. The assurances were virtually non-stop that the emir and other top leaders would assure that post-liberation Kuwait could look forward to a new political order based on more representative government.Now, after the tremendously costly U.N.-led intervention to free Kuwait from the invading Iraqis, that pledge so far remains unredeemed.Now the emir says merely that new parliamentary elections are indeed planned, but not for another 16 months.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2011
A soldier in the Maryland National Guard received a Christmas morning telephone call from President Obama expressing his gratitude - and that of the American people - for her service. Sgt. Samantha Sherrill, an air traffic controller with 29th Combat Aviation Brigade and a Randallstown native, received the call after she and her fellow members of the 29 t h 's F Company, 1st Battalion 111th General Support Aviation Battalion, flew to Kuwait on the last aircraft out of Iraq in support of operations.
SPORTS
By Sports on TV | April 13, 2011
WEDNESDAY'S TELEVISION HIGHLIGHTS NASCAR Sprint Cup Samsung Mobile 500 (T) SPEEDNoon MLB Philadelphia@Washington (T) MASN9:30 a.m. Colorado@Mets MLB1 Philadelphia@Washington ESPN2, MASN27 Orioles@Yankees MASN7 Cubs@Houston WGN-A8 Orioles@Yankees (T) MASN11:30 Philadelphia@Washington (T) ESPN22 a.m. NBA Chicago@New York (T)
NEWS
November 27, 2009
State to begin testing speed technology The State Highway Administration will begin testing next week on a system designed to help motorists move to reduced lanes more safely. A five-week study is planned for the Variable Speed Advisory technology, a traffic management tool that aims to permit lane merges without sudden stops or backups. Using roadside sensors, speed trailers and vehicle recognition software, SHA officials will gather information to determine if giving advisory speeds and travel time information helps reduce congestion.
NEWS
November 27, 2009
Pfc. Christopher Pfeiffer, 20, a Westminster soldier accused of deserting his Army unit, is slowly making his way home after paperwork problems threatened to strand him in Kuwait a second time. Pfeiffer's superiors notified him last week that he might be discharged from the Army. They said he failed to return to his unit after coming home over the summer on authorized leave to take care of his sick wife and newborn daughter. Pfeiffer's family said he did everything he could to contact his chain of command and either further extend his leave or make travel arrangements back to Afghanistan.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,brent.jones@baltsun.com | August 1, 2009
Marialou Anobas doesn't use the word "lucky" to describe herself because, as she sees it, surviving a hotel bombing and winning the lottery in the same lifetime requires more than just good fortune. Instead, the registered nurse will simply say somebody has a plan for her life, and the winding road that led her from her native Philippines, to Saudi Arabia, to Kuwait, to the United States, to winning $250,000 in Tuesday's Mega Millions drawing becomes more fulfilling every day. Anobas was one number away from claiming the $60 million jackpot.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 18, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Federal agents are investigating whether several large food companies charged the government excessively high prices for supplies to U.S. troops in Iraq and Kuwait, administration officials said yesterday. Widening their previously disclosed inquiries into contract fraud and corruption in Kuwait and Iraq, investigators from the Justice and Defense departments are examining deals that the Sara Lee Corp., ConAgra Foods and other U.S. companies made to supply the military, officials said.
NEWS
March 20, 1991
An acrid cloud of black smoke hung over Kuwait City on Monday, the result of up to 600 oil wells set on fire by Iraqi soldiers in their "scorched earth" policy. It was the worst day yet of pollution from the fiery oil fields. Visibility was cut to 500 yards; the city's temperature plunged from near-90 degrees to 60 degrees; at noon, drivers had to use their car lights to navigate the streets.This is Iraq's final gift to the Kuwaiti people: an environmental nightmare that poses grave health hazards to those in the country and people in nearby nations as well.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,[Sun Reporter] | September 9, 2007
Kuwait City, Kuwait -- Across a broad belt of growing instability that stretches from North Africa through the Persian Gulf to Pakistan, the United States is sliding into a hazardous new era, lacking the grand strategy to guide it through the complex perils ahead, and short of the military forces ready to safeguard America's vital interests, according to U.S. military officers and outside strategists. Attention is riveted this week on Iraq, as Gen. David Petraeus and President Bush prepare to report on the state of the war and their strategy for salvaging the U.S. intervention there and bringing troops home.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | August 29, 2007
CAMP BUEHRING, Kuwait -- As the Humvee began to flip over, no one was holding Maryland National Guard Army Cpl. Joseph Giles the right way. So the gunner's 5-foot, 5-inch frame, weighed down by a Kevlar helmet and armor-plated vest, began to slip out of the arms of the four other soldiers and inch toward the open hole on the top of the military jeep simulator. Eventually, the crew from the 1st Battalion, 175th Infantry Regiment corrected, but the lesson wasn't lost on the war-bound soldiers.
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