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Kurt Vonnegut

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By Alane Mason and Alane Mason,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 21, 1997
"Timequake," by Kurt Vonnegut. G.P. Putnam's Sons. 240 pages. $23.95. In 1969, at the height of Vietnam, Kurt Vonnegut published "Slaughterhouse Five," an irreverent, absurdist anti-war novel based on his experiences during the bombing of Dresden in World War II. He immediately became a guru, and is now dTC celebrated by dozens of critical works and Web sites devoted to fatherly Vonnegut photos, insiders' references to his invented jargon and his characters, links to the Chicago Tribune columnist's "graduation speech" made famous by its false attribution to Vonnegut, and breathless anticipation of his new novel.
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NEWS
By Ron Smith | April 28, 2011
"There is a tragic flaw in our precious Constitution, and I don't know what can be done to fix it. This is it: Only nut cases want to be president. " — Kurt Vonnegut Yes, yes, this is harsh, I know, because if the nut case in question is on your political party's team, you think he's a good man eager to help the common person and equipped with all sorts of valid ideas for fixing the various messes in which we find ourselves. So just consider it a thought to ponder. Besides, Vonnegut had a thick shell of cynicism around him. His view of humanity was part instinctual and in no small measure soured by the experience of being a World War II prisoner of war who was among those being held in a subway station in Dresden, Germany the night British Lancaster bombers incinerated about 135,000 inhabitants of that city.
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FEATURES
December 10, 1991
Author Kurt Vonnegut will be the featured speaker tonight at 8 at Shriver Hall on the Homewood Campus of Johns Hopkins University.His topic will be "The Importance of Free Speech: Thoughts by an Author." His speech is the final of a series of six in the 1991 Eisenhower Symposium Series that deal with the topic "The Imprisonment of Ideas: The First Amendment in Crisis."In more than 40 years as a writer, Mr. Vonnegut, 69, has written a number of novels, including "Cat's Cradle," "Slaughter-House Five," "Breakfast of Champions" and "Hocus Pocus."
NEWS
By Larry Williams and Larry Williams,Ideas Editor | April 15, 2007
Kurt Vonnegut, the gentle humanist who challenged Americans to be true to themselves and mistrust technology, wealth and the arrogance of power, died last week, possibly with a bemused appreciation of the fact that all of the ugliest aspects of popular culture he challenged for more than half a century appeared to be thriving. The author of 19 novels and an array of plays and short stories, he struggled to make a living as a writer of science fiction until the success in 1969 of Slaughterhouse-Five, a fictional treatment of his survival as a prisoner of war during the tragic and senseless Allied bombing of Dresden late in World War II. An estimated 135,000 people died in the Dresden firestorm.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Book Editor | December 11, 1991
Kurt Vonnegut was in a mood to talk about writing yesterday. That was a good thing, since seated around him were about 30 students in the Johns Hopkins University Writing Seminars -- and nearly all could not find a single question to ask one of America's esteemed men of letters.There was a time, maybe 20 years ago, when college students would have peppered him with questions about the writing of his classic novel "Slaughter-House Five," about his mordant short-story collection "Welcome to the Monkey House," about his satirical style or his observations on America's cultural decline.
NEWS
April 13, 2007
What are the conservatives doing with all the money and power that used to belong to all of us? They are telling us to be absolutely terrified, and to run around in circles like chickens with their heads cut off. But they will save us. They are making us take off our shoes at airports. Can anybody here think of a more hilarious practical joke than that one? Smile, America. You're on Candid Camera. - KURT VONNEGUT, from a speech he delivered in 2003; the author died Wednesday at age 84
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | July 17, 1992
Los Angeles -- One of the stranger things on the fall preview tour is how the press conferences, interviews and screenings are scheduled one after another all day with no delineation. You leave a press conference for the Cartoon Channel where Elmer Fudd is pointing a gun at Bugs Bunny, and walk into another room to hear Kurt Vonnegut talking about Salinger or Hemingway.It can be disorienting. It is, though, a hyper, three-dimensional version of the very way TV comes at us in our homes -- disjointed images and pieces of information seizing our attention, one flowing into the other with no separation, except an announcer or anchorman saying, "And now this."
NEWS
By Larry Williams and Larry Williams,Ideas Editor | April 15, 2007
Kurt Vonnegut, the gentle humanist who challenged Americans to be true to themselves and mistrust technology, wealth and the arrogance of power, died last week, possibly with a bemused appreciation of the fact that all of the ugliest aspects of popular culture he challenged for more than half a century appeared to be thriving. The author of 19 novels and an array of plays and short stories, he struggled to make a living as a writer of science fiction until the success in 1969 of Slaughterhouse-Five, a fictional treatment of his survival as a prisoner of war during the tragic and senseless Allied bombing of Dresden late in World War II. An estimated 135,000 people died in the Dresden firestorm.
FEATURES
By STEVE MCKERROW | May 11, 1991
Cable television often is like the storybook character "Madeline": When it is good, it's very, very good; but when it is bad, it's horrid. That's pretty much the case this weekend with a pair of premium service premieres.The good entry is "Kurt Vonnegut's Monkey House" on Showtime tomorrow night, bringing three short stories by the imaginative writer (Kurt Vonnegut Jr.) to TV for the first time. The horrid (and sordid) one is "Fever," a new HBO Pictures film premiering tonight.Taking the good first, "Monkey House" (at 9 p.m. tomorrow, with repeats May 15, 20 and 28)
FEATURES
By Tim Warren | December 11, 1991
KURT VONNEGUT was in a mood to talk about writing yesterday. That was a good thing, since seated around him were about 30 students in the Johns Hopkins University Writing Seminars -- and nearly all could not find a single question to ask one of America's esteemed men of letters.There was a time, maybe 20 years ago, when college students would have peppered him with questions about the writing of his classic novel "Slaughter-House Five," about his mordant short-story collection "Welcome to the Monkey House," about his satirical style or his observations on America's cultural decline.
NEWS
April 13, 2007
What are the conservatives doing with all the money and power that used to belong to all of us? They are telling us to be absolutely terrified, and to run around in circles like chickens with their heads cut off. But they will save us. They are making us take off our shoes at airports. Can anybody here think of a more hilarious practical joke than that one? Smile, America. You're on Candid Camera. - KURT VONNEGUT, from a speech he delivered in 2003; the author died Wednesday at age 84
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 12, 2007
NEW YORK -- Kurt Vonnegut, whose dark comic talent and urgent moral vision in novels including Slaughterhouse-Five, Cat's Cradle and God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater caught the temper of his times and the imagination of a generation, died last night in Manhattan. He was 84 and had homes in Manhattan and in Sagaponack on Long Island. His death was reported by Morgan Entrekin, a longtime family friend, who said Mr. Vonnegut suffered brain injuries as a result of a fall several weeks ago. Mr. Vonnegut wrote plays, essays and short fiction.
NEWS
By Alane Mason and Alane Mason,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 21, 1997
"Timequake," by Kurt Vonnegut. G.P. Putnam's Sons. 240 pages. $23.95. In 1969, at the height of Vietnam, Kurt Vonnegut published "Slaughterhouse Five," an irreverent, absurdist anti-war novel based on his experiences during the bombing of Dresden in World War II. He immediately became a guru, and is now dTC celebrated by dozens of critical works and Web sites devoted to fatherly Vonnegut photos, insiders' references to his invented jargon and his characters, links to the Chicago Tribune columnist's "graduation speech" made famous by its false attribution to Vonnegut, and breathless anticipation of his new novel.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Contributing Writer | January 20, 1993
Step into the world of Ed Martin. He installs what most folks incorrectly call "tin roofs."The proper name, he informs a visitor, is a "standing seam roof."Mr. Martin, president of Martin Sheet Metal Inc. in Hampstead, is neither a tin man as depicted in the Barry Levinson movie of that name nor a tin man in the "Wizard of Oz" sense. He's more Jack Kerouac and Garrison Keillor than a roofer.When he was 7 years old, he began walking and crawling across numerous roofs in Carroll County with his grandfather, who was in the roofing business.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | July 17, 1992
Los Angeles -- One of the stranger things on the fall preview tour is how the press conferences, interviews and screenings are scheduled one after another all day with no delineation. You leave a press conference for the Cartoon Channel where Elmer Fudd is pointing a gun at Bugs Bunny, and walk into another room to hear Kurt Vonnegut talking about Salinger or Hemingway.It can be disorienting. It is, though, a hyper, three-dimensional version of the very way TV comes at us in our homes -- disjointed images and pieces of information seizing our attention, one flowing into the other with no separation, except an announcer or anchorman saying, "And now this."
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Book Editor | December 11, 1991
Kurt Vonnegut was in a mood to talk about writing yesterday. That was a good thing, since seated around him were about 30 students in the Johns Hopkins University Writing Seminars -- and nearly all could not find a single question to ask one of America's esteemed men of letters.There was a time, maybe 20 years ago, when college students would have peppered him with questions about the writing of his classic novel "Slaughter-House Five," about his mordant short-story collection "Welcome to the Monkey House," about his satirical style or his observations on America's cultural decline.
NEWS
By George F. Will | September 30, 1990
WAR MAY BE hell, but peace is proving to be no picnic for some injudicious people. The end of the Cold War is rich in acute embarrassments for those who, while living on what proved to be the winning side, were on the wrong side of significant arguments.One argument concerned the guilt of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, the spies executed in 1953. Nikita Khrushchev, in taped reminiscences now published as memoirs, extols ''some good people'' who served a ''great cause of the Soviet state'':''I was part of Stalin's circle when he mentioned the Rosenbergs with warmth.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren | December 11, 1991
KURT VONNEGUT was in a mood to talk about writing yesterday. That was a good thing, since seated around him were about 30 students in the Johns Hopkins University Writing Seminars -- and nearly all could not find a single question to ask one of America's esteemed men of letters.There was a time, maybe 20 years ago, when college students would have peppered him with questions about the writing of his classic novel "Slaughter-House Five," about his mordant short-story collection "Welcome to the Monkey House," about his satirical style or his observations on America's cultural decline.
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