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By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 26, 1995
KURSK, Russia -- A stranger in a strange land, Larissa Piasheva is a carpetbagging capitalist down from the big city to win this provincial, working-class town's seat in parliament.She is a disciple of Milton Friedman and aspects of Reaganomics, and she is running for election from the heart of the old Soviet Union. In Kursk, former Communists still keep their party cards locked in safes like heirlooms.The region's favorite sons are Nikita Khrushchev, who was going to crush capitalism under his heel, and Alexander Rutskoi, who went to jail for leading a hard-line parliamentary Communist rebellion against President Boris N. Yeltsin in 1993.
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NEWS
By Amanda Angel and Amanda Angel,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2003
When Ramsey Flynn watched the tragedy of the Russian submarine Kursk unfold during the summer of 2000, he made it his mission to uncover the events that happened, even though he didn't speak Russian. On Thursday, Flynn spoke to a group of students and teachers at John Carroll School in Bel Air about his investigation of the sinking of the Kursk. One-hundred-eighteen men died on the submarine when a torpedo exploded, sending the Kursk to the bottom of the Barents Sea and touching off a worldwide rescue effort.
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NEWS
By Amanda Angel and Amanda Angel,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2003
When Ramsey Flynn watched the tragedy of the Russian submarine Kursk unfold during the summer of 2000, he made it his mission to uncover the events that happened, even though he didn't speak Russian. On Thursday, Flynn spoke to a group of students and teachers at John Carroll School in Bel Air about his investigation of the sinking of the Kursk. One-hundred-eighteen men died on the submarine when a torpedo exploded, sending the Kursk to the bottom of the Barents Sea and touching off a worldwide rescue effort.
NEWS
By Jennifer Blenner and Jennifer Blenner,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2003
Peppi Simmeth considers himself one of the lucky ones. Simmeth, a Bel Air resident, is a German World War II veteran who fought in the battles of Stalingrad and Kursk and then survived six years in a Russian prisoner-of-war camp. "I don't hold anything against anyone," he said to students at John Carroll School last week. "A war is a war, people react differently in a war." Simmeth, who will turn 80 next week, was invited to speak at John Carroll as part of the 60th anniversary of the Battle of Stalingrad, said Ed Miller, Russian language teacher at the school.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 21, 2000
MOSCOW - Three Norwegian divers opened the stubborn outer hatch of the stricken Russian submarine Kursk this morning, finally succeeding after a long day of little progress yesterday. They found the space below the hatch filled with water. Russian navy officials had said that would find a body of a sailor who had tried to make a desperate attempt at escape. But no one was there. Admiral Vyacheslav Popov, head of Russia's Northern Fleet, said this morning that the divers would go right to work on trying to open the inner hatch into the submarine.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Deborah Bach and Carl Schoettler and Deborah Bach,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2000
Encased in a metal tube 500 feet long and about 30 feet in diameter, patroling hundreds of feet underwater, smart, tough, highly trained nuclear submariners come to think of themselves as an elite force with an extraordinary esprit de corps. There's a bond among undersea warriors that extends beyond national boundaries and even includes the potential enemies, old or new. They know what the crewmen of the Russian sub Kursk felt as it plunged to the bottom of the Barents Sea. But at the elbow-to-elbow battle stations of the silent service, there's very little room for fear.
NEWS
By Jennifer Blenner and Jennifer Blenner,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2003
Peppi Simmeth considers himself one of the lucky ones. Simmeth, a Bel Air resident, is a German World War II veteran who fought in the battles of Stalingrad and Kursk and then survived six years in a Russian prisoner-of-war camp. "I don't hold anything against anyone," he said to students at John Carroll School last week. "A war is a war, people react differently in a war." Simmeth, who will turn 80 next week, was invited to speak at John Carroll as part of the 60th anniversary of the Battle of Stalingrad, said Ed Miller, Russian language teacher at the school.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 20, 2000
MOSCOW -- As the tranquil Arctic dusk turned pink and gold last night, Norwegian divers and a British rescue craft prepared to descend to the remains of the Kursk. But a Russian admiral said it was unlikely there would be anyone left alive to rescue. A week after the nuclear-powered submarine plunged to the bottom of the Barents Sea, Adm. Mikhail Motsak, chief of staff of the Northern Fleet, said the navy had been able to piece together a partial idea of the horrifying minutes, hours and days after the accident.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 19, 2000
MOSCOW - Rescuers in the Barents Sea failed in four attempts yesterday to reach the crewmen of the stricken Kursk, although they came agonizingly close when a submersible craft reached one of the sunken submarine's hatches. Navy officials said the hatch was too badly damaged to open. Far to the south, on the Black Sea, a beleaguered Russian President Vladimir V. Putin said he had decided not to cut short his vacation when he learned of the sinking because if he had flown to the rescue center outside Murmansk he would have only gotten in the way. Putin returned to Moscow last night, to a distinctly more hostile political world than the one he left last Saturday at just about the time the sub was hitting the bottom.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 22, 2000
MOSCOW - Norwegian divers found the stranded submarine Kursk to be flooded throughout yesterday, and the Russian navy declared the entire 118-man crew dead, bringing to an end the drawn-out rescue drama that has left Russians in puzzlement and despair. The wreck of the nuclear submarine in the Barents Sea shook this country more than the far deadlier apartment house bombings a year ago, more than the war in Chechnya that followed, more than the explosion in a busy pedestrian underpass in Moscow two weeks ago. The navy repeatedly showed itself unable to come up with a consistent or satisfactory explanation as to what had happened or what was going on. The country's president, Vladimir V. Putin, showed a lack of political horse sense by staying away on vacation while the crisis was under way. The press, controlled by business tycoons who have recently turned against Putin, showed itself willing to take on the popular president.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 21, 2000
MOSCOW - Three Norwegian divers opened the stubborn outer hatch of the stricken Russian submarine Kursk this morning, finally succeeding after a long day of little progress yesterday. They found the space below the hatch filled with water. Russian navy officials had said that would find a body of a sailor who had tried to make a desperate attempt at escape. But no one was there. Admiral Vyacheslav Popov, head of Russia's Northern Fleet, said this morning that the divers would go right to work on trying to open the inner hatch into the submarine.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 20, 2000
MOSCOW -- As the tranquil Arctic dusk turned pink and gold last night, Norwegian divers and a British rescue craft prepared to descend to the remains of the Kursk. But a Russian admiral said it was unlikely there would be anyone left alive to rescue. A week after the nuclear-powered submarine plunged to the bottom of the Barents Sea, Adm. Mikhail Motsak, chief of staff of the Northern Fleet, said the navy had been able to piece together a partial idea of the horrifying minutes, hours and days after the accident.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Deborah Bach and Carl Schoettler and Deborah Bach,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2000
Encased in a metal tube 500 feet long and about 30 feet in diameter, patroling hundreds of feet underwater, smart, tough, highly trained nuclear submariners come to think of themselves as an elite force with an extraordinary esprit de corps. There's a bond among undersea warriors that extends beyond national boundaries and even includes the potential enemies, old or new. They know what the crewmen of the Russian sub Kursk felt as it plunged to the bottom of the Barents Sea. But at the elbow-to-elbow battle stations of the silent service, there's very little room for fear.
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 26, 1995
KURSK, Russia -- A stranger in a strange land, Larissa Piasheva is a carpetbagging capitalist down from the big city to win this provincial, working-class town's seat in parliament.She is a disciple of Milton Friedman and aspects of Reaganomics, and she is running for election from the heart of the old Soviet Union. In Kursk, former Communists still keep their party cards locked in safes like heirlooms.The region's favorite sons are Nikita Khrushchev, who was going to crush capitalism under his heel, and Alexander Rutskoi, who went to jail for leading a hard-line parliamentary Communist rebellion against President Boris N. Yeltsin in 1993.
NEWS
By excerpted by Will Englund and excerpted by Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 22, 2000
In the nine days between the sinking of the Russian nuclear submarine Kursk -- on Aug. 12 -- and Norwegian divers yesterday opening the vessel and determining the crew could not have survived, the Russian press has become steadily more critical of the Ministry of Defense and President Vladimir V. Putin. What follows is a sampling of recent commentary in Russian newspapers and magazines, excerpted by Will Englund of The Sun's Moscow Bureau and by the bureau staff. It's no sin to be poor, but abject poverty means damnation It appears that the list of suggested causes of the Kursk nuclear submarine's sinking has by now been finally exhausted.
NEWS
By Norman Polmar | August 23, 2000
WASHINGTON -- How could it have happened? The Kursk was one of the most modern submarines of the Russian fleet. A giant, 19,000-ton, 505-foot underwater missile cruiser, it was designed to attack U.S. aircraft carriers with long-range missiles. Except for the Russian Typhoon strategic missile submarines, the Kursk and its sister boats are the largest submarines ever built -- larger in volume than even the Trident missile submarines, the largest U.S. undersea craft. The Kursk was new, completed in 1995, and its crew was considered one of the best in the Navy.
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