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By Garrett Therolf and Garrett Therolf,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 10, 2007
BAGHDAD -- A truck bomb exploded in midtown Irbil in the semi-autonomous region of Kurdistan yesterday, killing 19 people, injuring 70 and illustrating the worsening violence in areas of Iraq previously considered to be relatively safe. The violence came on the day that Vice President Dick Cheney made a surprise trip to Iraq. The visit was part of the Bush administration's campaign to keep pressure on Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki's government to forge ahead with legislation to mend sectarian rifts.
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NEWS
By Tina Susman and Asso Ahmed and Tina Susman and Asso Ahmed,Los Angeles Times | December 27, 2007
BAGHDAD -- Kurdish lawmakers agreed yesterday to a six-month delay in a referendum on whether the oil-rich city of Kirkuk should join the semiautonomous region of Kurdistan or remain under Iraqi central government control. The delay had been expected because of problems in arranging logistics for the vote, which was supposed to have been held by the end of the year. A census to determine who would be eligible to vote, for instance, has not yet been done. But by putting off the issue, the lawmakers highlighted what has become a constant in Iraq: the inability of leaders to settle disputes whose resolution are considered key to ending ethnic and sectarian strife.
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NEWS
By Tina Susman and Asso Ahmed and Tina Susman and Asso Ahmed,Los Angeles Times | December 27, 2007
BAGHDAD -- Kurdish lawmakers agreed yesterday to a six-month delay in a referendum on whether the oil-rich city of Kirkuk should join the semiautonomous region of Kurdistan or remain under Iraqi central government control. The delay had been expected because of problems in arranging logistics for the vote, which was supposed to have been held by the end of the year. A census to determine who would be eligible to vote, for instance, has not yet been done. But by putting off the issue, the lawmakers highlighted what has become a constant in Iraq: the inability of leaders to settle disputes whose resolution are considered key to ending ethnic and sectarian strife.
NEWS
By Ted Galen Carpenter | May 15, 2007
An increasing number of moderates who oppose the Bush administration's policy in Iraq - and even some supporters of it - are flirting with the option of redeploying U.S. forces to the Kurdish areas in the north. Sen. Christopher J. Dodd of Connecticut, a Democratic presidential contender, has openly advocated such a policy, and others, including former U.N. ambassador Richard Holbrooke and Washington Post war hawk Charles Krauthammer, have floated similar proposals. The redeployment strategy has understandable appeal to moderates.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 16, 2005
ALTUN KOPRI, Iraq -- As lines of voters snaked out of two polling stations along the main road here in northern Iraq, and as celebratory gunfire resounded through the neighborhood, a group of children chanted Kurdish songs and waved Kurdish flags as they barreled through the middle of this village. By all appearances here, yesterday's elections for national parliamentary seats may as well have been about Kurdistan and Kurdish dreams. Iraq, or the idea of Iraq, seemed as distant as the moon.
NEWS
By Ted Galen Carpenter | May 15, 2007
An increasing number of moderates who oppose the Bush administration's policy in Iraq - and even some supporters of it - are flirting with the option of redeploying U.S. forces to the Kurdish areas in the north. Sen. Christopher J. Dodd of Connecticut, a Democratic presidential contender, has openly advocated such a policy, and others, including former U.N. ambassador Richard Holbrooke and Washington Post war hawk Charles Krauthammer, have floated similar proposals. The redeployment strategy has understandable appeal to moderates.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 17, 2006
HALABJA, Iraq --For nearly two decades, Kurds have gathered peacefully in this mountainous corner of northern Iraq to commemorate one of the blackest days in their history. It was here that Saddam Hussein's government launched a poison gas attack that killed more than 5,000 people on March 16, 1988. So it came as a shock when hundreds of stone-throwing protesters took to the streets here on the anniversary yesterday, beating back government guards to storm and destroy a museum dedicated to the memory of the Halabja attack.
NEWS
October 15, 1996
AMERICAN DIPLOMATS should be telling the leaders of Kurdish Iraq that if they fight each other, the United States cannot protect them from external enemies, Saddam Hussein included.The Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK) has been rolling back the conquest made by the Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP) in early September. It is not surprising that the pendulum would swing from the Iran-aided PUK to the Iraq-backed KDP and back again. It is ominous but not surprising that KDP chief Massoud Barzani would claim that Jalal Talabani's PUK advance is made with Iranian troops.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | February 26, 1999
PARIS -- The Kosovar Albanians, like the Kurds, are inconvenient peoples of the Ottoman Empire, left behind when the empire collapsed and the great powers remade the political geography of Europe and the Middle East after the World War I. They were left out when the national homes were distributed.The Allies preferred an integral Turkey to an unpredictable Kurdistan -- which was equally unwelcome to Iraq, a British League of Nations mandate, and to Iran, a British protectorate in the 1920s.
NEWS
By Christopher Hitchens | January 3, 2007
I was sitting with President Jalal Talabani of Iraq last month when Iraqi television was broadcasting the trial of Saddam Hussein. The hearings had shifted into their second phase, concerning the mass murder of Iraq's Kurdish minority in the 1980s, and video footage of gassing and shooting had been played in court, to ram home the anguished statements of numberless survivors. There was something both satisfying and unsettling about the juxtaposition. It is fitting that Iraq's first elected president is a Kurd, but I couldn't help noticing that he didn't much want to be drawn out on the subject.
NEWS
By Garrett Therolf and Garrett Therolf,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 10, 2007
BAGHDAD -- A truck bomb exploded in midtown Irbil in the semi-autonomous region of Kurdistan yesterday, killing 19 people, injuring 70 and illustrating the worsening violence in areas of Iraq previously considered to be relatively safe. The violence came on the day that Vice President Dick Cheney made a surprise trip to Iraq. The visit was part of the Bush administration's campaign to keep pressure on Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki's government to forge ahead with legislation to mend sectarian rifts.
NEWS
By Christopher Hitchens | January 3, 2007
I was sitting with President Jalal Talabani of Iraq last month when Iraqi television was broadcasting the trial of Saddam Hussein. The hearings had shifted into their second phase, concerning the mass murder of Iraq's Kurdish minority in the 1980s, and video footage of gassing and shooting had been played in court, to ram home the anguished statements of numberless survivors. There was something both satisfying and unsettling about the juxtaposition. It is fitting that Iraq's first elected president is a Kurd, but I couldn't help noticing that he didn't much want to be drawn out on the subject.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 17, 2006
HALABJA, Iraq --For nearly two decades, Kurds have gathered peacefully in this mountainous corner of northern Iraq to commemorate one of the blackest days in their history. It was here that Saddam Hussein's government launched a poison gas attack that killed more than 5,000 people on March 16, 1988. So it came as a shock when hundreds of stone-throwing protesters took to the streets here on the anniversary yesterday, beating back government guards to storm and destroy a museum dedicated to the memory of the Halabja attack.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 19, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- A U.S. soldier and three Iraqi policemen were killed yesterday in two roadside bomb attacks in Baghdad, while Iraqi and U.S. forces in the snow-covered mountains of Iraqi Kurdistan searched for a missing plane that was carrying five German businessmen. The soldier was killed when a bomb exploded near his vehicle in eastern Baghdad at 8 a.m., the U.S. military said. A half-hour later, the Iraqi policemen died when a bomb detonated near their patrol along the Muhammad al-Qassim highway in Baghdad.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 16, 2005
ALTUN KOPRI, Iraq -- As lines of voters snaked out of two polling stations along the main road here in northern Iraq, and as celebratory gunfire resounded through the neighborhood, a group of children chanted Kurdish songs and waved Kurdish flags as they barreled through the middle of this village. By all appearances here, yesterday's elections for national parliamentary seats may as well have been about Kurdistan and Kurdish dreams. Iraq, or the idea of Iraq, seemed as distant as the moon.
NEWS
By Jeffrey Fleishman and Jeffrey Fleishman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 25, 2003
SHINERWE MOUNTAIN, Iraq - The moon is quarter-full and bright. Ambush teams fan into the valley below, their radios squawking every now and then. Somebody jokes that this land is harsh, a place where even souls decay. The machine-gunner in the bunker doesn't laugh. He doesn't blink. He just peers through his scope for an enemy in the night. Kurdish Maj. Fatih Abdullah Faraj was shot not long ago. The bullet shattered some teeth. Mortars killed two fighters he knew. Others had their throats slit.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | March 18, 2001
It's time for "Foreign News Notes from Abroad." Our top story today is the recent presidential election held some time last year in Kyrgyzstan. By way of background: Kyrgyzstan is an actual nation located in the western hemisphere. Or possibly the eastern hemisphere. It's definitely in a hemisphere. Historically, Kyrgyzstan is part of the group of nations -- also including Pakistan, Afghanistan, Uzbekistan and Kurdistan -- that were founded by a tribe of men named "Stan." Unfortunately, most Americans know little about Kyrgyzstan.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 19, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- A U.S. soldier and three Iraqi policemen were killed yesterday in two roadside bomb attacks in Baghdad, while Iraqi and U.S. forces in the snow-covered mountains of Iraqi Kurdistan searched for a missing plane that was carrying five German businessmen. The soldier was killed when a bomb exploded near his vehicle in eastern Baghdad at 8 a.m., the U.S. military said. A half-hour later, the Iraqi policemen died when a bomb detonated near their patrol along the Muhammad al-Qassim highway in Baghdad.
NEWS
By Joshua Kucera and Joshua Kucera,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 27, 2002
ERBIL, Iraq - Internet cafes, satellite television, opposition political parties, even ersatz McDonald's restaurants. This is Iraq, but it's not Saddam Hussein's. People here call it Kurdistan, an autonomous semi-state that broke free from Baghdad's control 10 years ago and has since provided its mostly Kurdish population with a life relatively free of the hardships and restrictions most Iraqis face. Now, with a U.S. attack on Iraq seeming likely, Kurdistan is being watched closely as a possible ally and staging ground.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | March 18, 2001
It's time for "Foreign News Notes from Abroad." Our top story today is the recent presidential election held some time last year in Kyrgyzstan. By way of background: Kyrgyzstan is an actual nation located in the western hemisphere. Or possibly the eastern hemisphere. It's definitely in a hemisphere. Historically, Kyrgyzstan is part of the group of nations -- also including Pakistan, Afghanistan, Uzbekistan and Kurdistan -- that were founded by a tribe of men named "Stan." Unfortunately, most Americans know little about Kyrgyzstan.
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