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By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Sun Staff Correspondent | April 25, 1991
SILOPI, Turkey -- As a way was sought yesterday to get armed Iraqi police out of Zakho, Kurdish refugees jammed into camps here said they would need more than the temporary disappearance of government forces to draw them home.They would need long-term guarantees of their security, they said.Leaders of the largest Kurdish clan here said they would return to northern Iraq if the Iraqi police left and security were assured by foreign protective forces."As long as Iraqi soldiers or police remained in Zakho, it is not possible, but when they are replaced by American or coalition forces, then it would be OK" to return home, said Rashid Bashir Sindi, whose father's clan is estimated to number 50,000 among the refugees here and at the Isikveren camp, high on the Turkish mountain border with Iraq.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | September 29, 1992
Farouk smiles, spreads his arms wide and thanks "everyone for letting me come here."From a camp in Turkey, the Iraqi refugee tried for 18 months to get to "this beautiful green town.""He's been in Turkey and thinks the green is so beautiful," said Anwar. "I've been in Saudi Arabia for 18 months. Imagine how I feel."Farouk and Anwar are among 23 Iraqi refugees and former prisoners of war temporarily housed at the New Windsor Service Center."They have had nothing and lived in fear," said Mayor James C. Carlisle.
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NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 13, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The week-old campaign ordered by President Bush to feed, clothe and shelter the hundreds of thousands of Kurds fleeing Iraq has quickly expanded into what has been called the largest relief effort in modern military history and is still growing fast.U.S. military engineers, food handlers and medical personnel, as well as tons of supplies and the trucks, ships and helicopters needed to carry them, were being rushed yesterday toward the mountain camps of Iraq's Kurdish refugees.
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo | May 19, 1991
Paris.--I returned home from Turkey two days ago to find a cat trapped in a tree near the Russian Orthodox church here. Its gray fur matted from the rain, the terrified cat was hugging the top of the spindly tree.When I called, the guardian at the church sounded near tears upon hearing my description of the cat, which had disappeared two days before. "God bless your soul," he gushed, and hurried out to rescue his cat.A month before, a Kurdish medical student and his extended family of 19 from northern Iraq struggled to survive without water or food on the mountainous border between Iraq and Turkey.
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Sun Staff Correspondent | April 17, 1991
SILOPI, Turkey -- Bedrya Rashid found lunch growing by the gravel lot on the edge of Turkey's model refugee camp here yesterday -- a plant leaf called chandar in Kurdish, not something she normally eats or gives to her family."
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 5, 1991
DIYARBAKIR, Turkey -- As coalition troops expand th security zone for refugee assistance, concern appears to be growing in the Turkish government that the protected areas may lead to the creation of a Kurdish state in northern Iraq."
NEWS
April 9, 1991
The United States has joined other nations in calling for a major international relief effort for Kurdish refugees fleeing Iraq. Some relief work, including air drops by U.S., French and British planes, has already started.How far do you think the United States and the United Nations should go?1. Should the United Nations provide military protection for the Kurdish refugees?2. Should the United Nations provide military protection for a relief effort?3. Should the United Nations establish a "buffer zone" in northern and southern Iraq for the repatriation and settlement of Kurdish refugees fleeing the country?
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 9, 1991
LUXEMBOURG -- The leaders of the 12-nation European Community agreed last night to support a British proposal calling for the United Nations to create a "safe haven" in northern Iraq to protect the Kurdish population from the Iraqi army.[The EC also approved $183 million in humanitarian aid to the Kurds and other refugees fleeing Iraqi repression, the Associated Press reported.]British Prime Minister John Major offered his surprise proposal for the haven at a European Community summit meeting here without consulting President Bush, but he said he thought Washington would approve it.The plan, urging quick action to safeguard the lives of Kurdish refugees, is expected to be presented to the U.N. Security Council soon.
NEWS
April 16, 1991
Tens of thousands of Kurdish refugees are fleeing Iraq. Many are dying along the way or in refugee camps, where little aid has been provided so far. The Evening Sun would like to know if the refugee crisis has changed your opinion about the war. Do you now believe the United States' war effort was a complete success, a partial success or a failure?To register your opinion, call SUNDIAL, the Baltimore Sun's directory of telephone information services, at 783-1800 (or 268-7736 in Anne Arundel County)
NEWS
April 27, 1991
The gulf conflict has given Japan and Germany a chance to break out of their post-World War II inhibitions against even the most remote and indirect involvement of their military forces overseas.During the U.S.-led arms buildup and attack on Iraq, governments in Bonn and Tokyo were paralyzed, this despite a realization that a more active contribution to the coalition war effort would increase their clout in world affairs. Now that a cease fire prevails in the Persian Gulf, Japan and Germany evidently feel free to set mild interventionist precedents of potential future importance.
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 9, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Two U.S. Navy jets on a reconnaissance mission over northern Iraq were attacked twice by Iraqi artillery units Tuesday, the first confirmed incidents of hostile fire since allied forces began occupying a designated security zone for Kurdish refugees, U.S. military officials disclosed yesterday.The A-6E Intruders were unscathed, and there was no immediate retaliatory action, officials said.The planes continued their mission and returned safely to the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt, which has been positioned off the coast of Turkey to support U.S. military operations in northern Iraq.
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 5, 1991
DIYARBAKIR, Turkey -- As coalition troops expand th security zone for refugee assistance, concern appears to be growing in the Turkish government that the protected areas may lead to the creation of a Kurdish state in northern Iraq."
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 1, 1991
ZAKHO, Iraq -- Packed in cars with their windshields shot out, battered school buses, and gasoline and garbage trucks, Kurdish refugees began their mass return home yesterday, ending their painful monthlong sojourn as unwanted refugees along the Turkish border.Hamsi Ibrahim Keloo joined the wary convoy of the dispossessed with her only surviving son, an imp named Khalad, and her cousin, Heshmal Mohammed Saleh, 13.They had set out from Turkey in the morning, guided as far as the Iraqi border by her husband, who then stayed behind on the Turkish side with their six daughters.
NEWS
April 27, 1991
The gulf conflict has given Japan and Germany a chance to break out of their post-World War II inhibitions against even the most remote and indirect involvement of their military forces overseas.During the U.S.-led arms buildup and attack on Iraq, governments in Bonn and Tokyo were paralyzed, this despite a realization that a more active contribution to the coalition war effort would increase their clout in world affairs. Now that a cease fire prevails in the Persian Gulf, Japan and Germany evidently feel free to set mild interventionist precedents of potential future importance.
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Sun Staff Correspondent | April 25, 1991
SILOPI, Turkey -- As a way was sought yesterday to get armed Iraqi police out of Zakho, Kurdish refugees jammed into camps here said they would need more than the temporary disappearance of government forces to draw them home.They would need long-term guarantees of their security, they said.Leaders of the largest Kurdish clan here said they would return to northern Iraq if the Iraqi police left and security were assured by foreign protective forces."As long as Iraqi soldiers or police remained in Zakho, it is not possible, but when they are replaced by American or coalition forces, then it would be OK" to return home, said Rashid Bashir Sindi, whose father's clan is estimated to number 50,000 among the refugees here and at the Isikveren camp, high on the Turkish mountain border with Iraq.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Richard H. P. Sia and Mark Matthews and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 24, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration is planning a substantial relief effort for the 1 million Iraqi refugees in Iran and may ship supplies directly into Iran on military aircraft, officials said yesterday.Planning for the operation is sensitive because of the absence of diplomatic relations and the continuing strains between the United States and Iran. But one official said an announcement could come as early as today.For the past several weeks, the United States has concentrated its relief efforts, including military airlifts, on the Iraqi-Turkish border, in part because of strong appeals by Turkish President Turgut Ozal, who developed a close relationship with President Bush during the Persian Gulf crisis.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Richard H. P. Sia and Mark Matthews and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 24, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration is planning a substantial relief effort for the 1 million Iraqi refugees in Iran and may ship supplies directly into Iran on military aircraft, officials said yesterday.Planning for the operation is sensitive because of the absence of diplomatic relations and the continuing strains between the United States and Iran. But one official said an announcement could come as early as today.For the past several weeks, the United States has concentrated its relief efforts, including military airlifts, on the Iraqi-Turkish border, in part because of strong appeals by Turkish President Turgut Ozal, who developed a close relationship with President Bush during the Persian Gulf crisis.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 18, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration, which held out hopes at war's end that a shamed and angry Iraqi military would topple President Saddam Hussein, has now accepted the fact that he is not in imminent political danger and that it must look to the country's long-term economic straits to weaken him."There's no doubt that his domestic position has improved considerably in the past month," said a U.S. official, reflecting the views of government analysts."He decisively defeated the most serious threat to his regime" in crushing Kurdish and Shiite Muslim rebellions, and there are no efforts within his military to topple him, the official added.
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Sun Staff Correspondent | April 21, 1991
SILOPI, Turkey -- A contingent of 500 Marines entered northern Iraq yesterday afternoon, in the first phase of U.S. plans to lure Kurdish refugees home from Turkey by providing allied military protection and emergency relief in part of northern Iraq, U.S. military spokesmen here said.The Marines left here by helicopter at 1 p.m. for an area near Zakho, about eight miles from the Turkish border. They were to assure protection of the land and begin laying the infrastructure for the first relief center, said Army Maj. Ron Gahagan.
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Sun Staff Correspondent | April 20, 1991
ZAKHO BORDER CROSSING, Iraq -- Top military officials from Iraq and the U.S.-led coalition providing humanitarian aid to Kurdish refugees met at an abandoned customs post here yesterday but failed to reach agreement in advance of the allied military deployment in northern Iraq.Speaking after a 45-minute meeting with Iraqi Staff Brig. Gens. Abdul-Hafiz Jezail and Nushwan Danoun, U.S. Lt. Gen. John L. Shalikashvili said the two sides had held "a very frank exchange of views, which gave me the chance to make the points I wanted to make."
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