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By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 4, 1994
TAIPEI, Taiwan -- The party that has ruled Taiwan for the last 45 years lost an election yesterday for control of Taiwan's capital city to an opposition party advocating that the island declare formal independence from China.But the long-dominant Kuomintang, or Nationalist Party, retained the governorship of Taiwan, thereby offering support to Taiwan President Lee Teng-hui and his policy of gradual rapprochement with mainland China.The Kuomintang, whose leaders fled China in 1949 after being defeated by the Communists, also kept control of the country's second city, Kaohsiung.
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NEWS
By Barbara Demick and Barbara Demick,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 27, 2008
BEIJING - A top Taiwanese politician arrived in China yesterday for a six-day visit amid hope for warmer relations between the longtime foes. The head of the island's ruling party will meet with Chinese President Hu Jintao during a groundbreaking visit that follows the May 20 inauguration of a new Taiwanese president, Ma Ying-jeou, who is eager to fulfill a campaign pledge of improving ties. For China, the visit provides an opportunity ahead of the Olympic Games in August to project itself as a superpower committed to world peace.
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NEWS
December 19, 1998
THE THREAT of crisis between China and Taiwan receded when the party that has ruled the island since the 1940s made a surprising comeback in elections last week.After Taiwan went democratic in 1987 and the Kuomintang, or Nationalist Party, gave up its monopoly on power, the tide turned away from mainland refugees of 1949 toward native-born Taiwanese.When native Chen Shui-bian of the Democratic Progressive Party, became mayor of Taipei in 1994, he also became favored to win the presidency in 2000 on a platform declaring independence.
NEWS
February 11, 2002
THE REST of the world may be comfortable recognizing two Chinas, but both Beijing's communist rulers and their Kuomintang nationalist enemies on Taiwan believe there is only one China. And Taiwan is an integral part of it. The trouble is the once-powerful Kuomintang, which fled the mainland in 1949 when the communists took over, lost power in Taiwan as well two years ago. And the island's increasingly powerful indigenous population doesn't want to be part of China; it is striving for independence.
NEWS
February 11, 2002
THE REST of the world may be comfortable recognizing two Chinas, but both Beijing's communist rulers and their Kuomintang nationalist enemies on Taiwan believe there is only one China. And Taiwan is an integral part of it. The trouble is the once-powerful Kuomintang, which fled the mainland in 1949 when the communists took over, lost power in Taiwan as well two years ago. And the island's increasingly powerful indigenous population doesn't want to be part of China; it is striving for independence.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 30, 1995
TAIPEI, Taiwan -- With his coiffed hair, snazzy clothes and deftly managed call-in show, Lee Tao easily lives up to his unofficial billing as Taiwan's Larry King.For the past month, he has concentrated his show on Taiwan's imminent parliamentary elections, talking to people about the issues, the broken promises and the money politics that every democracy delights in discussing.Saturday's vote, however, is more than a routine election.Instead it marks the start of a four-month period that will transform Taiwanese politics, capping the island's 10-year changeover from dictatorship to full democracy.
NEWS
By Barbara Demick and Barbara Demick,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 27, 2008
BEIJING - A top Taiwanese politician arrived in China yesterday for a six-day visit amid hope for warmer relations between the longtime foes. The head of the island's ruling party will meet with Chinese President Hu Jintao during a groundbreaking visit that follows the May 20 inauguration of a new Taiwanese president, Ma Ying-jeou, who is eager to fulfill a campaign pledge of improving ties. For China, the visit provides an opportunity ahead of the Olympic Games in August to project itself as a superpower committed to world peace.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 12, 1995
NANJING, China -- The shooting for the movie begins each day at 7 a.m., but by 6:30 a.m. people are already crowding the fences around the Zhonghuamen, the largest of Nanjing's medieval gates.The young people come to catch a glimpse of the --ing actor who plays the leading role. But the older ones are here to glimpse a rare airing of their history, the re-creation of an event of nearly 60 years ago, one so colored by politics and national pride that it is usually shrouded from view.The subject of the movie is known in the West as the Rape of Nanjing, a six-week massacre that began Dec. 13, 1937, when Japan's Imperial Army slid into barbarism.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 18, 2000
TAIPEI, Taiwan -- The result of today's presidential election in Taiwan will reverberate from Beijing to Washington, but it will be decided by people like Huang Wen-ying, a 41-year-old mother from the central city of Taichung. Until several days ago, she was among the group of undecided voters who analysts say are critical to winning a three-way presidential race that recent polls show is too close to call. Huang had been leaning toward Chen Shui-bian, a popular reformer whose opposition Democratic Progressive Party (DPP)
NEWS
By Ian Johnson | May 2, 1993
THE MAN WHOSTAYED BEHIND.Sidney Rittenbergand Amanda Bennett.Simon & Schuster.475 pages. $25.Sidney Rittenberg's life has been a string of improbabilities. A South Carolina youth inflamed by notions of social justice, he became the only foreigner to join the Chinese Communist Party. An early victim of the party's paranoia, he chose to stay in China after being released from his gulag. A Chinese Communist for 35 years, he returned to 1980s America to become a successful businessman.His life has encompassed true love, Mao Tse-tung and drug-induced insanity, which makes it easy to underestimate this autobiography.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 18, 2000
TAIPEI, Taiwan -- The result of today's presidential election in Taiwan will reverberate from Beijing to Washington, but it will be decided by people like Huang Wen-ying, a 41-year-old mother from the central city of Taichung. Until several days ago, she was among the group of undecided voters who analysts say are critical to winning a three-way presidential race that recent polls show is too close to call. Huang had been leaning toward Chen Shui-bian, a popular reformer whose opposition Democratic Progressive Party (DPP)
NEWS
By Jim Mann | January 28, 2000
TAIPEI, Taiwan -- One of the first big developments of the year 2000 could well be an epochal change in Chinese politics: the downfall of the Kuomintang, or Nationalist Party. For most of the 20th century, the KMT, which traces its origins to Sun Yat-sen and Chiang Kai-shek, has held power, first on the Chinese mainland and then after 1949 on Taiwan. While losing miserably in China's civil war, the KMT has managed for more than 70 years to retain uninterrupted control of the government it calls the Republic of China.
NEWS
December 19, 1998
THE THREAT of crisis between China and Taiwan receded when the party that has ruled the island since the 1940s made a surprising comeback in elections last week.After Taiwan went democratic in 1987 and the Kuomintang, or Nationalist Party, gave up its monopoly on power, the tide turned away from mainland refugees of 1949 toward native-born Taiwanese.When native Chen Shui-bian of the Democratic Progressive Party, became mayor of Taipei in 1994, he also became favored to win the presidency in 2000 on a platform declaring independence.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 30, 1995
TAIPEI, Taiwan -- With his coiffed hair, snazzy clothes and deftly managed call-in show, Lee Tao easily lives up to his unofficial billing as Taiwan's Larry King.For the past month, he has concentrated his show on Taiwan's imminent parliamentary elections, talking to people about the issues, the broken promises and the money politics that every democracy delights in discussing.Saturday's vote, however, is more than a routine election.Instead it marks the start of a four-month period that will transform Taiwanese politics, capping the island's 10-year changeover from dictatorship to full democracy.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 12, 1995
NANJING, China -- The shooting for the movie begins each day at 7 a.m., but by 6:30 a.m. people are already crowding the fences around the Zhonghuamen, the largest of Nanjing's medieval gates.The young people come to catch a glimpse of the --ing actor who plays the leading role. But the older ones are here to glimpse a rare airing of their history, the re-creation of an event of nearly 60 years ago, one so colored by politics and national pride that it is usually shrouded from view.The subject of the movie is known in the West as the Rape of Nanjing, a six-week massacre that began Dec. 13, 1937, when Japan's Imperial Army slid into barbarism.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 4, 1994
TAIPEI, Taiwan -- The party that has ruled Taiwan for the last 45 years lost an election yesterday for control of Taiwan's capital city to an opposition party advocating that the island declare formal independence from China.But the long-dominant Kuomintang, or Nationalist Party, retained the governorship of Taiwan, thereby offering support to Taiwan President Lee Teng-hui and his policy of gradual rapprochement with mainland China.The Kuomintang, whose leaders fled China in 1949 after being defeated by the Communists, also kept control of the country's second city, Kaohsiung.
NEWS
By Jim Mann | January 28, 2000
TAIPEI, Taiwan -- One of the first big developments of the year 2000 could well be an epochal change in Chinese politics: the downfall of the Kuomintang, or Nationalist Party. For most of the 20th century, the KMT, which traces its origins to Sun Yat-sen and Chiang Kai-shek, has held power, first on the Chinese mainland and then after 1949 on Taiwan. While losing miserably in China's civil war, the KMT has managed for more than 70 years to retain uninterrupted control of the government it calls the Republic of China.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Staff Writer | April 25, 1993
TAIPEI, Taiwan -- Three years ago, Hsu Hsin-liang was in jail on sedition charges. Now he leads an opposition party controlling almost a third of this island's legislature. In three years, he could become Taiwan's first directly elected president.The change in Mr. Hsu's fortunes reflects an extraordinary political transformation here.Taiwan's economic miracle is well known. Less recognized is its political miracle. After decades of often brutal rule by the Chinese Nationalist Party that fled here from China's mainland in the 1940s, Taiwan has become the first democracy in 4,000 years of Chinese history.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson | May 2, 1993
THE MAN WHOSTAYED BEHIND.Sidney Rittenbergand Amanda Bennett.Simon & Schuster.475 pages. $25.Sidney Rittenberg's life has been a string of improbabilities. A South Carolina youth inflamed by notions of social justice, he became the only foreigner to join the Chinese Communist Party. An early victim of the party's paranoia, he chose to stay in China after being released from his gulag. A Chinese Communist for 35 years, he returned to 1980s America to become a successful businessman.His life has encompassed true love, Mao Tse-tung and drug-induced insanity, which makes it easy to underestimate this autobiography.
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