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NEWS
May 14, 2009
On Tuesday, May 12, 2009, PATRICIA B. KUMMEROW age 68 of Ruxton; beloved wife of Burton K. Kummerow for 18 years; devoted mother of Nathaniel A. Tower and Melissa R. Tower; stepmother of Elke Hautala and Cassandra Keenum; sister of Ann McIntosh, Timothy Brosnahan and Penelope Tassie; grandmother of Samuel Tower. A memorial service is being planned for a future date. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the Living Legacy Foundation or the House of Ruth. Arrangements by Peace
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Baltimore, home to the first received telegraph message (Samuel Morse, 1844, sent from Washington), the first umbrella factory in America (1828), the first Ouija board (1892) and - to note what really matters - the first baseball player to win MVP awards in both leagues (Frank Robinson, 1966) and the first Olympian to win eight gold medals in a single games ( Michael Phelps , 2008). As if that doesn't engender enough civic pride for any municipality, it seems Charm City, according to the Maryland Historical Society, can add another first to its list: birthplace of the American bicycle.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | May 18, 2009
Patricia "Tricia" Kummerow, a retired teacher who helped raise funds for local charities and educational institutions, died of a stroke Tuesday at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Ruxton resident was 68. Born Mary Patricia Brosnahan in New Rochelle, N.Y., and raised in Chicago, Cleveland and Darien, Conn., she graduated from the Madeira School, near Washington, D.C., and received an English degree from Wheaton College in Norton, Mass. Mrs. Kummerow moved to Baltimore in 1973 and began her career teaching and tutoring dyslexic students at the then-new Jemicy School.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2011
An 89-year-old Arizona man worried that no one showed interest in a U.S. flag hand-stitched by his grandmother and her mother 150 years ago. By chance, his concerns found their way to the Maryland Historical Society, where a curator said her eyes filled with tears as she gently unwrapped the rare, homemade 34-star flag that flew above a West Baltimore street during the Civil War. "I had this feeling this was something special, extraordinary," said...
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | March 13, 1994
FREDERICK -- The former executive director of restoration at Maryland's historic 17th-century settlement, St. Mary's City, has been chosen to head a new museum here devoted to 19th-century medicine.Burton K. Kummerow, chief of interpretation and exhibits for the Maryland Historic Trust, will be executive director of the National Museum of Civil War Medicine, which is to open in downtown Frederick in late 1995 or early 1996.Mr. Kummerow, 53, who for several years was executive director of the Historic St. Mary's City Commission -- the government-funded keeper of the state's oldest Colonial village -- was chosen from a national field of about 100 candidates, said John E. Olson, a museum board member.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Baltimore, home to the first received telegraph message (Samuel Morse, 1844, sent from Washington), the first umbrella factory in America (1828), the first Ouija board (1892) and - to note what really matters - the first baseball player to win MVP awards in both leagues (Frank Robinson, 1966) and the first Olympian to win eight gold medals in a single games ( Michael Phelps , 2008). As if that doesn't engender enough civic pride for any municipality, it seems Charm City, according to the Maryland Historical Society, can add another first to its list: birthplace of the American bicycle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2011
An 89-year-old Arizona man worried that no one showed interest in a U.S. flag hand-stitched by his grandmother and her mother 150 years ago. By chance, his concerns found their way to the Maryland Historical Society, where a curator said her eyes filled with tears as she gently unwrapped the rare, homemade 34-star flag that flew above a West Baltimore street during the Civil War. "I had this feeling this was something special, extraordinary," said...
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach | December 27, 2009
The cash-strapped Maryland Historical Society, which recently had to trim its museum and library hours to two days a week, has appointed the head of a Towson-based firm that focuses on making history accessible to the masses as its interim head. Burton Kummerow, president of Historyworks Inc., was named to the post Tuesday. "He reeks of history, from every fiber of his being," society board president Alex G. Fisher said. "He has an undergraduate degree in history, he has a master's in history.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | December 27, 2009
The cash-strapped Maryland Historical Society, which recently had to trim its museum and library hours to two days a week, has appointed the head of a Towson-based firm that focuses on making history accessible to the masses as its interim head. Burton Kummerow, president of Historyworks Inc., was named to the post Tuesday. "He reeks of history, from every fiber of his being," society board president Alex G. Fisher said. "He has an undergraduate degree in history, he has a master's in history.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2010
William Luzerne Brown III, a historian who spent more than three decades helping make history come alive for visitors to National Park Service sites throughout the nation, died Tuesday from renal cancer at Carroll Hospice's Dove House in Westminster. The longtime Taneytown resident was 71. Born in Washington, the son of an insurance adjuster and a homemaker, Mr. Brown was a 1956 graduate of Wheaton High School. "He grew up in the District of Columbia listening to his grandmother's tales about the old days in the nation's capital," said Burt Kummerow, director of the Maryland Historical Society and a friend for 48 years.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | December 27, 2009
The cash-strapped Maryland Historical Society, which recently had to trim its museum and library hours to two days a week, has appointed the head of a Towson-based firm that focuses on making history accessible to the masses as its interim head. Burton Kummerow, president of Historyworks Inc., was named to the post Tuesday. "He reeks of history, from every fiber of his being," society board president Alex G. Fisher said. "He has an undergraduate degree in history, he has a master's in history.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach | December 27, 2009
The cash-strapped Maryland Historical Society, which recently had to trim its museum and library hours to two days a week, has appointed the head of a Towson-based firm that focuses on making history accessible to the masses as its interim head. Burton Kummerow, president of Historyworks Inc., was named to the post Tuesday. "He reeks of history, from every fiber of his being," society board president Alex G. Fisher said. "He has an undergraduate degree in history, he has a master's in history.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | May 18, 2009
Patricia "Tricia" Kummerow, a retired teacher who helped raise funds for local charities and educational institutions, died of a stroke Tuesday at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Ruxton resident was 68. Born Mary Patricia Brosnahan in New Rochelle, N.Y., and raised in Chicago, Cleveland and Darien, Conn., she graduated from the Madeira School, near Washington, D.C., and received an English degree from Wheaton College in Norton, Mass. Mrs. Kummerow moved to Baltimore in 1973 and began her career teaching and tutoring dyslexic students at the then-new Jemicy School.
NEWS
May 14, 2009
On Tuesday, May 12, 2009, PATRICIA B. KUMMEROW age 68 of Ruxton; beloved wife of Burton K. Kummerow for 18 years; devoted mother of Nathaniel A. Tower and Melissa R. Tower; stepmother of Elke Hautala and Cassandra Keenum; sister of Ann McIntosh, Timothy Brosnahan and Penelope Tassie; grandmother of Samuel Tower. A memorial service is being planned for a future date. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the Living Legacy Foundation or the House of Ruth. Arrangements by Peace
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | March 13, 1994
FREDERICK -- The former executive director of restoration at Maryland's historic 17th-century settlement, St. Mary's City, has been chosen to head a new museum here devoted to 19th-century medicine.Burton K. Kummerow, chief of interpretation and exhibits for the Maryland Historic Trust, will be executive director of the National Museum of Civil War Medicine, which is to open in downtown Frederick in late 1995 or early 1996.Mr. Kummerow, 53, who for several years was executive director of the Historic St. Mary's City Commission -- the government-funded keeper of the state's oldest Colonial village -- was chosen from a national field of about 100 candidates, said John E. Olson, a museum board member.
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