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BUSINESS
By Robert E. Kessler and Robert E. Kessler,Newsday | April 14, 2007
$1,023,600,000. That's the amount of money that the stockholders of Computer Associates lost as a result of the accounting fraud by former Chief Executive Officer Sanjay Kumar. Both Kumar, 44, and federal prosecutors agree on the number, which was computed by government economic consultants, according to court papers. They also agree that Kumar is responsible for repaying shareholders as a result of a plea deal. Yesterday, in U.S. District Court in Brooklyn, N.Y., Judge I. Leo Glasser signed off on the pact in which Kumar will be required to pay $798 million in restitution.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2013
A Morgan State University professor accused of defrauding the National Science Foundation also paid out Department of Defense grant money to students in exchange for kickbacks, federal prosecutors allege in a court filing. Manoj Kumar Jha, director of the university's Center for Advanced Transportation and Infrastructure Engineering Research, handed stipend checks to students at the university, the document said, but demanded they pay part of the money back to him. The students were not asked to do any research in return, prosecutors wrote.
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NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,Special to the Sun | December 23, 2007
When Anjali DasSarma's grandmother gave her ankle bells from India, the 8-year-old wanted to know how to dance with them. Her mother, Priya DasSarma of Ellicott City, followed Anjali's lead, switching her from ballet lessons to a class in Indian classical dance. At a recent class, DasSarma watched her daughter dance in a traditional yellow and blue Punjabi costume. She said the class "has been an experience for me also" because DasSarma did not study Indian dance as a child. The DasSarmas are one of many Howard County families using dance to teach their children about their Indian heritage.
NEWS
By Martha Joynt Kumar | November 18, 2012
Presidential second terms have a bad name. The traditional view is that presidents are stuck with first-term leftovers on their plates and a calendar that calls on them to get any legislation through Congress in the first 18 to 24 months. After that, few in Congress listen because the chief executive's time in office is limited. President George W. Bush discovered the limits of his authority with his signature second term legislative efforts on Social Security and then immigration reform.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | March 8, 2007
One of the more unusual restaurants in Baltimore is Tamber's, a '50s-style diner that improbably serves Indian food alongside the burgers and milkshakes. The combination must work, because Tamber's has been sending out this mixed cultural message for more than 15 years. Tamber's was already a local landmark, known as Tamber's Nifty Fifties Diner, when it was acquired by Petro Kumar in 1991. Kumar kept the name, but soon began adding vindaloos, biryanis and other Indian dishes to the menu.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2001
Martha Joynt Kumar moves confidently through the White House press office and toward the West Wing, a press pass swinging from a chain around her neck. She looks like a reporter, in her wrinkle-resistant knits and smart, black flats. She kibitzes like the reporters. To some extent, she acts like a reporter, buttonholing White House officials for interviews. Even former White House press secretary Marlin Fitzwater assumed she was a reporter, although he had never seen a member of the Fourth Estate arrive in a Jaguar.
BUSINESS
By ROBERT E. KESSLER and ROBERT E. KESSLER,NEWSDAY | April 25, 2006
Sanjay Kumar, who went from living in a mud-floored home in Sri Lanka to being chairman and chief executive officer of Computer Associates International Inc., pleaded guilty yesterday to orchestrating a sweeping fraud to keep the company's stock afloat and lying about his actions to federal investigators. Pleading guilty with Kumar in U.S. District Court in Brooklyn was Stephen Richards, a New Zealand native with a fondness for racing sports cars, who was executive vice president for worldwide sales for the Long Island company.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | December 20, 2001
COLLEGE PARK -- Sonia Kumar would like to think she was picked to be the speaker at today's midterm commencement ceremony at the University of Maryland for reasons other than her ethnic background. Sure, it might seem timely, she says, to have a student with Middle Eastern and South Asian roots address the campus in the wake of Sept. 11. She's part Iranian, Indian and Turkish, but she hopes that's not all there was to it. Chances are, it's not. It's possible the university chose Kumar for a more timeless reason: She's a good writer and can be counted on to deliver a good speech to the 3,900 students who will receive their diplomas here today.
NEWS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2000
A Baltimore Circuit Court jury yesterday ordered Toyota Motor Corp. and the estate of a Harford County man to pay $59 million to Prashant Kumar of Bowie for injuries suffered in a car accident three years ago. Yesterday's verdict is not final; Judge John Carroll Byrnes must hand down a judgment, and he could reduce the award. Under New Jersey law, Toyota could be liable for about $25 million and the estate of Alfred C. Shumar, the driver who caused the accident, would be responsible for the balance.
BUSINESS
By Pradnya Joshi and Pradnya Joshi,NEWSDAY | September 24, 2004
Former executives at Computer Associates International Inc., including former chief executive Sanjay Kumar, could have to pay back hundreds of millions of dollars in pay, bonuses and stock gains under the lawsuits that the government filed yesterday. The Justice Department and the Securities and Exchange Commission will still have to prove that corporate executives were directly responsible for the accounting fraud and misstatements in revenues. But armed with new laws and cooperation from the new management at CA, some experts think that prosecutors will have strong ammunition in getting damages from former executives.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2011
The Harold & Kumar Munchies Truck Tour is coming to the Baltimore area on Wednesday, Nov. 2. Votes will decide whether the nationwide promotional truck lands near Towson University of the Johns Hopkins University Homewood Campus. UPDATE, Oct. 31, 12:55 p.m. Johns Hopkins beat Towson in the voting. The A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Munchies tour will be on North Charles Street between 33rd and 34th streets on Wednesday betwen 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Get free Chowhound burgers while supplies last.
FEATURES
May 2, 2008
Capsules by Michael Sragow or Chris Kaltenbach, unless noted. Full reviews are at baltimoresun.com/movies. Baby Mama -- Tina Fey inhabits what should be her comfort zone as a career woman who decides to use a surrogate to have a baby and ends up with raucous, declasse Amy Poehler. As the movie makes its way toward a denouement that leaves everyone happy-ever-after, the film feels emptier than your typical successful high-concept comedy. Part of the problem is the center will not hold: The TV stars are outmatched by a strong supporting cast (Will Forte, Greg Kinnear, Maura Tierney, Holland Taylor, Steve Martin, Sigourney Weaver and more)
TRAVEL
By Peter Mandel and Peter Mandel,Special to the Sun | April 27, 2008
THE HIGHWAY OUT OF DELHI, INDIA, LOOKS like it has a rash. What is this stuff? It's smashed-up watermelons from a truck. I realize I am going to die here, along with all this fruit, when I notice that my driver hasn't slowed. Ahead on the left is the wreck of the melon truck. I can see the Indian make, Tata, on its colorful bumper and the instruction, "Please Blow Horn." Too late for that. To our right is a steamroller rolling the wrong way. Straight in front, we are about to demolish three old men on a bicycle, a cart being tugged by a camel, a homemade tractor, and -- I can watch their flicking tails up close -- a herd of calico goats.
FEATURES
By Michael Phillips and Michael Phillips,Chicago Tribune | April 25, 2008
Greasy, hazy good fun, Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle got by on a 4 a.m. mixture of explosive-emission toilet jokes, gratuitous nudity and Neil Patrick Harris as himself. Everything took place in one night, hinging on a single quest rife with detours. Crass? Yes. But there was a merry spirit to it all. A far more strident sort of crassness pervades Harold & Kumar Escape from Guantanamo Bay. The sequel picks up and tokes up where the original left off. New Jersey roommates Harold and Kumar set off for Amsterdam, the Netherlands, so that Harold can chase the woman of his dreams (Paula Garces)
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,Special to the Sun | December 23, 2007
When Anjali DasSarma's grandmother gave her ankle bells from India, the 8-year-old wanted to know how to dance with them. Her mother, Priya DasSarma of Ellicott City, followed Anjali's lead, switching her from ballet lessons to a class in Indian classical dance. At a recent class, DasSarma watched her daughter dance in a traditional yellow and blue Punjabi costume. She said the class "has been an experience for me also" because DasSarma did not study Indian dance as a child. The DasSarmas are one of many Howard County families using dance to teach their children about their Indian heritage.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun Reporter | December 2, 2007
You could describe Martha Joynt Kumar as a dance critic. After all, she has spent most of the last three decades observing, chronicling and commenting on one of the most delicate pas de deux on the planet - that between the president and the White House press corps. The most recent result of these efforts is the book Managing the President's Message: The White House Communications Operation, just published by the Johns Hopkins University Press. It looks at the relationship between the last four presidents and the press at a time when the tempo of the dance was picking up, first with cable news, now the Internet.
TRAVEL
By Peter Mandel and Peter Mandel,Special to the Sun | April 27, 2008
THE HIGHWAY OUT OF DELHI, INDIA, LOOKS like it has a rash. What is this stuff? It's smashed-up watermelons from a truck. I realize I am going to die here, along with all this fruit, when I notice that my driver hasn't slowed. Ahead on the left is the wreck of the melon truck. I can see the Indian make, Tata, on its colorful bumper and the instruction, "Please Blow Horn." Too late for that. To our right is a steamroller rolling the wrong way. Straight in front, we are about to demolish three old men on a bicycle, a cart being tugged by a camel, a homemade tractor, and -- I can watch their flicking tails up close -- a herd of calico goats.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2001
In the dim light, with five of her daughters ringing the end of her bed, a ventilator strapped to her face and four IV lines dripping into her body, Thelma "Elly" Alexander lies bundled under the white sheets, dying. By her side in the intensive-care unit at St. Joseph Medical Center is a woman, poised on a chair, cradling a harp. She is here to do what medicine can't: ease the transition to death. She eyes the monitors, fixates on Alexander's face and, ever so gently, in rhythm with the 85-year-old woman's breathing, begins to pluck the strings of the harp.
NEWS
By Glenn Graham and Glenn Graham,Sun reporter | September 26, 2007
Mount Hebron boys soccer coach Mike Linsemeyer had to do plenty of patchwork going into the season after the Vikings lost seven starters from last year's Class 3A state championship team. One such area was in goal, where an unexpected and pleasant answer has been found. Before this summer, senior Travis Kumar had never played soccer let alone spent any time in goal. He ran cross country in past fall seasons, played basketball for Linsemeyer in the winter and ran track in the spring. Kumar, who always wanted to give soccer a try, was getting tired of the rigors of cross country, and the soccer team had plenty of openings.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun Reporter | April 22, 2007
ONE PROBLEM WITH THE SEASON'S popular jersey knits is the tendency for the soft material to end the day looking frumpy and lazy, instead of comfy and easy. WONDERING IF YOU WERE GLIMPSED? Check out baltimoresun.com / glimpsed for additional photos of fashion-forward locals and a critique by fashion writer Tanika White of the styles she saw around town.
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