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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2001
Dana T. Sweeney of Baltimore is getting a recipe that has some fat yet is potentially low-fat and certainly delicious. Her request was for a cottage-cheese kugel that was low-fat, low-calorie and "delicious" - a dish that she "had made many times" before losing the recipe. Tester Laura Reiley chose a not-so-fat-free recipe from Barbara Rubin of Baltimore, who wrote: "You can substitute any of the dairy ingredients with lower-fat or fat-free products." Cottage-Cheese Kugel Serves 6 8 ounces wide egg noodles 4 tablespoons butter or margarine, melted 3 eggs, beaten slightly 12-ounce container creamed or small-curd cottage cheese 1 cup sour cream 1/2 cup milk 1 small can crushed pineapple (drained)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2013
Claire Green from Parkton was looking for a recipe for a noodle kugel like the one she remembers her grandmother making for the Jewish holidays when she was growing up. Kugel is a staple at most Jewish holiday meals - with the exception of Passover, during which time egg noodles are not permitted. There are endless variations on the kugel theme; they can be made savory or sweet, topped or not, and can include dried fruit or nuts or seasonings. Quite a few readers sent in their family's favorite kugel recipe.
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NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 26, 2006
Judith Miller of East Windsor, N.J., was looking for a recipe that her mother used to make in the 1940s for a rice pudding that was baked and looked like a cake when it was done. Barbara Arnoff of Baltimore sent in her recipe for what she calls rice kugel, which is rice pudding baked either in a round or square pan, with a consistency solid enough that it can be cut into slices and served like a cake. The kugel can be served warm or cold. It's delicious on its own or jazzed up with a dollop of fresh whipped cream or a scoop of vanilla ice cream on the side.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2010
Social shopping is the new trend in Internet commerce these days. Websites have sprouted up, promising great discounts if a certain number of people sign up to buy. Groupon and LivingSocial are some of the most prominent, but a small Maryland startup is also trying to make a name for itself. Jasmere was started by Katrina Kugel, 40, and Jeremy Kugel, 38, a husband-and-wife team with marketing experience in corporate America. Their Silver Spring neighbor, Andy O'Mara, also is a partner.
NEWS
By Donna Beth Joy Shapiro and Donna Beth Joy Shapiro,Special to The Sun | April 16, 2008
When I need to go to a happy place in my head, I invariably wind up at my Bubbe's Sunday night table, which always featured lokshen (noodle) kugel. The noodles were just a good excuse to add raisins and almost every dairy product in her fridge. It was the ambrosia of my youth. She served this every Sunday night, except during Passover, when noodles cannot be used. Food plays a huge role in the observance of most Jewish holidays. Apples and honey are eaten on Rosh Hashana, potato latkes and jelly doughnuts on Hanukkah, hamantaschen on Purim.
NEWS
June 15, 2007
COLE KUGEL, 105 Oldest licensed pilot in U.S. Cole Kugel, the oldest licensed pilot in the U.S., died Monday in Denver of natural causes, according to Ahlberg Funeral Chapel. The Federal Aviation Administration said Mr. Kugel was the oldest licensed American pilot. Though his license never expired, his health certificate, which is required to fly a plane, lapsed in 2001, FAA spokesman Paul Turk said. But Mr. Kugel did take the controls of a small plane less than two months ago, said Lynn Ferguson, a pilot friend and the grandson of one of Mr. Kugel's early flying buddies.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | March 22, 1992
For the children celebrating the Jewish holiday of Purim on Thursdayin Annapolis, the day meant a chance to eat special pastries and dress up in crowns and robes and gold jewelry.For the adults, the day's significance was more serious -- but equally joyous.About 60 people came to the Purim celebration at the Pleasure Cove Yacht Club, sponsored by the Lubavitch Educational Center. Thursdaywas Purim, a day that Jewish people remember their survival under Persian rule."Throughout the ages, people have tried to destroy theJewish people," said Leonard Bulman.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media | January 7, 1992
Get a move on. Financial advisers are urging clients to shift money out of low-interest investments and into the stock market now.This call to action has helped boost the Dow Jones industrial average to record highs. After all, money has to go somewhere when it's pulled out of certificates of deposit and money-market funds.The year 1992 is, indeed, shaping up as another fine one for the stock market, though few expect it to equal 1991 and the breakneck upward pace of recent months."The investor with money in CDs and money-market accounts can expect a total return of just 4 percent in 1992 vs. the 20 percent return we expect for the stock market," said James Coxon, director of U.S. equity investments for Kemper Financial Services.
FEATURES
By Andrea F. Siegel | July 4, 1992
MILK & HONEY BISTRO 1777 Reisterstown Road. Hours: 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sundays; 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays; 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Fridays; 2 hours after sundown Saturday to 1:30 a.m. Sunday. (410) 486-4344. If vegetarian fast foods translate to you as paltry meals only a rabbit can appreciate, you haven't been to Milk & Honey.There's no meat to be had here, but you won't miss it. This is a kosher vegetarian, dairy and fish place, serving up as hearty or as light a meal as suits you. Soups, sandwiches, salads, quiches, baked fish, pancakes, spaghetti, macaroni and cheese -- quite a variety.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2004
Scene DJs LoveGrove and Adam Auburn play host to a new dance event at Power Plant LiveM-Fs Mosaic lounge, which caters to an upscale crowd. page 14T P I C K O F T H E W E E K What: Concert in the Park Where: Mount Vernon Place When: Tonight from 5:30 to 8:30 Why: Because you can check out the sounds of pop-rock artist Ben Arnold and rockers the Damnwells in the next-to-last concert of the season. Admission: Free Information: www.godowntown baltimore.com Trips Spend a day checking out the World War II Memorial in Washington.
NEWS
By Donna Beth Joy Shapiro and Donna Beth Joy Shapiro,Special to The Sun | April 16, 2008
When I need to go to a happy place in my head, I invariably wind up at my Bubbe's Sunday night table, which always featured lokshen (noodle) kugel. The noodles were just a good excuse to add raisins and almost every dairy product in her fridge. It was the ambrosia of my youth. She served this every Sunday night, except during Passover, when noodles cannot be used. Food plays a huge role in the observance of most Jewish holidays. Apples and honey are eaten on Rosh Hashana, potato latkes and jelly doughnuts on Hanukkah, hamantaschen on Purim.
NEWS
June 15, 2007
COLE KUGEL, 105 Oldest licensed pilot in U.S. Cole Kugel, the oldest licensed pilot in the U.S., died Monday in Denver of natural causes, according to Ahlberg Funeral Chapel. The Federal Aviation Administration said Mr. Kugel was the oldest licensed American pilot. Though his license never expired, his health certificate, which is required to fly a plane, lapsed in 2001, FAA spokesman Paul Turk said. But Mr. Kugel did take the controls of a small plane less than two months ago, said Lynn Ferguson, a pilot friend and the grandson of one of Mr. Kugel's early flying buddies.
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 26, 2006
Judith Miller of East Windsor, N.J., was looking for a recipe that her mother used to make in the 1940s for a rice pudding that was baked and looked like a cake when it was done. Barbara Arnoff of Baltimore sent in her recipe for what she calls rice kugel, which is rice pudding baked either in a round or square pan, with a consistency solid enough that it can be cut into slices and served like a cake. The kugel can be served warm or cold. It's delicious on its own or jazzed up with a dollop of fresh whipped cream or a scoop of vanilla ice cream on the side.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2004
Scene DJs LoveGrove and Adam Auburn play host to a new dance event at Power Plant LiveM-Fs Mosaic lounge, which caters to an upscale crowd. page 14T P I C K O F T H E W E E K What: Concert in the Park Where: Mount Vernon Place When: Tonight from 5:30 to 8:30 Why: Because you can check out the sounds of pop-rock artist Ben Arnold and rockers the Damnwells in the next-to-last concert of the season. Admission: Free Information: www.godowntown baltimore.com Trips Spend a day checking out the World War II Memorial in Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 2, 2004
Snyder's Cafe and Deli has been serving Jewish comfort food from its location in the massive Valley Center strip mall for nine years now. The lengthy menu features such Jewish favorites as noodle kugel, brisket, knishes and bagels. But Snyder's, owned by brothers Howard and Brian Snyder, is not a kosher restaurant. It serves shellfish, forbidden in kosher diets, in many forms, including Maryland crab soup and fried shrimp. The shrimp salad sandwich, in particular, is divine, made from large shrimp that are chopped into bite-sized chunks, bound with mayonnaise and seasoned with Old Bay. It comes on a Kaiser roll with lettuce and slices of tomato.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 18, 2004
I knew instantly that Kaidanoff's Broadway Delicatessen was my kind of place. The Rolling Stones were blaring on the sound system and there were Three Stooges photographs on the wall. In a corner stood a mannequin autographed by John Waters, Mink Stole and Patty Hearst. The deli occupies a small storefront surrounded on three sides by the U-shaped Bertha's in the heart of Fells Point. The menu features a few salads and a bunch of deli-style sandwiches, many of which are burdened with Baltimore-inspired names.
FEATURES
By Tina Wasserman and Tina Wasserman,Dallas Morning News Universal Press Syndicate | September 22, 1993
If you thought serving a Thanksgiving dinner was difficult, imagine going without food or water for 24 hours -- then having to feed a whole crowd of people who are just as hungry.That's the plight of the Yom Kippur host, who must go home from the synagogue and serve a groaning board of food.Planning a menu that can be on the table in 20 minutes is the trick. The secret is to mix store-bought foods with some made ahead.Yom Kippur (Saturday) is the last and holiest day of the Jewish High Holy Days that began with Rosh Hashana.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 18, 2004
I knew instantly that Kaidanoff's Broadway Delicatessen was my kind of place. The Rolling Stones were blaring on the sound system and there were Three Stooges photographs on the wall. In a corner stood a mannequin autographed by John Waters, Mink Stole and Patty Hearst. The deli occupies a small storefront surrounded on three sides by the U-shaped Bertha's in the heart of Fells Point. The menu features a few salads and a bunch of deli-style sandwiches, many of which are burdened with Baltimore-inspired names.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 26, 2003
The carryout food at the Suburban House brought with it an imperative: Go find a ruler. Several of the dishes seemed a bit out of scale. Not absurdly out of scale like the touristy delis in New York - hey, who doesn't like a pound of bacon on a BLT? - but enough to let you know you are definitely getting your money's worth. But the good news is that the quality of the food, as well as the size, is also above average at this longtime Pikesville eatery. Carryout is handled in a separate room attached to the Suburban House's sit-down restaurant.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2001
Dana T. Sweeney of Baltimore is getting a recipe that has some fat yet is potentially low-fat and certainly delicious. Her request was for a cottage-cheese kugel that was low-fat, low-calorie and "delicious" - a dish that she "had made many times" before losing the recipe. Tester Laura Reiley chose a not-so-fat-free recipe from Barbara Rubin of Baltimore, who wrote: "You can substitute any of the dairy ingredients with lower-fat or fat-free products." Cottage-Cheese Kugel Serves 6 8 ounces wide egg noodles 4 tablespoons butter or margarine, melted 3 eggs, beaten slightly 12-ounce container creamed or small-curd cottage cheese 1 cup sour cream 1/2 cup milk 1 small can crushed pineapple (drained)
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