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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 6, 2004
KUFA, Iraq - The Grand Mosque of Kufa has now become the grand arsenal. Yesterday, as U.S. authorities issued an arrest warrant for Muqtada al-Sadr, the radical Shiite cleric who set off the most serious insurrection against the occupation forces, hundreds of his supporters were busy fortifying the mosque with heavy weapons, bracing for a U.S. invasion. Al-Sadr has barricaded himself inside the golden brick walls, refusing to surrender. His militia is prowling the streets, staring down the sights of machine guns, building fighting positions in and around the mosque, the town's biggest, and pointing rocket-propelled grenades at the highway heading north - the road they expect to see U.S. forces come rumbling down.
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NEWS
By Evan Osnos and Evan Osnos,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 27, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Rebel cleric Muqtada al-Sadr and the U.S.-backed Iraqi government reached a deal forged by Iraq's most powerful Shiite cleric late yesterday that would end the bloody standoff in Najaf by requiring that rebel forces disarm in exchange for a peaceful exit from the city. The deal brokered by Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Husseini al-Sistani - just hours after his momentous return to his embattled home city - offers fragile hope to resolve a crisis that has gripped Iraq since Aug. 5, reduced much of central Najaf to ruins and challenged the authority of the nation's fledgling government.
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NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 24, 2004
KUFA, Iraq - The doors they can fix. But no one is sure how yesterday's raid at a Kufa mosque will play with a local population that has learned to live side by side with rebel Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr's al-Mahdi Army fighters. Less than 12 hours after U.S. forces completed their early-morning sweep at the al-Sahleh mosque - uncovering a weapons cache and killing 32 rebel fighters citywide - civil affairs and psychological operations teams returned to the site to assess the damage and take the city's pulse.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 11, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - U.S. forces engaged militia loyal to radical Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr for a sixth day in Najaf, as the U.S. military used loudspeakers yesterday to appeal to entrenched guerrillas to lay down their weapons and to urge residents to stay away from the fighting. In an ancient cemetery not far from the headquarters of al-Sadr in Najaf, U.S. troops have confronted the guerrillas in battles that have brought them to the edges of some of the holiest sites in Shiite Islam, including the shrine of Imam Ali, creating serious political and social risks for the Americans and the new government of Prime Minister Ayad Allawi.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 3, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - A car bombing in the Adhamiya neighborhood here in the capital killed at least five Iraqis and wounded 38 yesterday, a hospital director said. Just outside the northern city of Kirkuk, a shell fired into an arms depot at a U.S. military base touched off an enormous explosion that sent a black cloud of smoke over the skyline. According to an initial report, no one was injured, a military spokesman said. And fighting continued to rage in the holy city of Kufa between U.S. soldiers and militiamen loyal to a rebel Shiite cleric.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 29, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - A day after the declaration of a much-heralded truce between U.S. soldiers and forces loyal to a rebel Shiite cleric, battles broke out in the city of Kufa, killing at least five militiamen. Each side accused the other of shooting first, but both said they intended to honor the truce. The clashes took place between patrols run by the 1st Armored Division and members of the Mahdi Army, the militia led by Muqtada al-Sadr, the 31-year-old radical cleric. Large bands of militiamen armed with AK-47s and heavy weapons, including rocket-propelled grenade launchers, roamed the streets of Kufa and neighboring Najaf.
NEWS
By Evan Osnos and Evan Osnos,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 27, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Rebel cleric Muqtada al-Sadr and the U.S.-backed Iraqi government reached a deal forged by Iraq's most powerful Shiite cleric late yesterday that would end the bloody standoff in Najaf by requiring that rebel forces disarm in exchange for a peaceful exit from the city. The deal brokered by Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Husseini al-Sistani - just hours after his momentous return to his embattled home city - offers fragile hope to resolve a crisis that has gripped Iraq since Aug. 5, reduced much of central Najaf to ruins and challenged the authority of the nation's fledgling government.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 11, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - U.S. forces engaged militia loyal to radical Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr for a sixth day in Najaf, as the U.S. military used loudspeakers yesterday to appeal to entrenched guerrillas to lay down their weapons and to urge residents to stay away from the fighting. In an ancient cemetery not far from the headquarters of al-Sadr in Najaf, U.S. troops have confronted the guerrillas in battles that have brought them to the edges of some of the holiest sites in Shiite Islam, including the shrine of Imam Ali, creating serious political and social risks for the Americans and the new government of Prime Minister Ayad Allawi.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 5, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Muqtada al-Sadr, the radical young Shiite cleric, has been spewing invective and threatening widespread insurrection for months while U.S. occupation authorities have been focused on a more moderate Shiite leader, Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Husseini al-Sistani. At the same time, al-Sadr was amassing an army. Yesterday, he unleashed it. At his word, thousands of disciples, wearing green headbands and carrying automatic rifles, stormed into the streets of several cities and set off the most widespread mayhem of the occupation.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 17, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - A U.S. soldier who has been missing for a week since his fuel convoy was attacked west of Baghdad was seen on a videotape yesterday being held captive by six armed and masked men. The family of the soldier, Pfc. Keith Maupin, 20, of Batavia, Ohio, confirmed his identity. A voice speaking in Arabic on the tape, first shown on the Arab news network al-Jazeera, said Maupin was being held to trade for Iraqi prisoners in the hands of Americans. Maupin, who identified himself on the tape, was dressed in fatigues and a floppy desert hat and shown looking down, chewing on his lip nervously.
NEWS
By Samson Mulugeta and Samson Mulugeta,NEWSDAY | June 4, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - The one man in Iraq with the power to single-handedly scuttle the new U.S.-backed interim government gave it a guarded but crucial endorsement yesterday. The statement from Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani came on a day when the United Nation's Security Council wrangled over the scope of Iraq's sovereignty and its control over security forces after June 30. Meanwhile, in the southern city of Kufa, sporadic fighting continued between U.S. forces and the militia of renegade cleric Muqtada al-Sadr, killing six Iraqis and wounding 11. In Baghdad, as well, there was no respite from the violence as mortar rounds rained on a busy thoroughfare near the Italian Embassy.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 3, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - A car bombing in the Adhamiya neighborhood here in the capital killed at least five Iraqis and wounded 38 yesterday, a hospital director said. Just outside the northern city of Kirkuk, a shell fired into an arms depot at a U.S. military base touched off an enormous explosion that sent a black cloud of smoke over the skyline. According to an initial report, no one was injured, a military spokesman said. And fighting continued to rage in the holy city of Kufa between U.S. soldiers and militiamen loyal to a rebel Shiite cleric.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 31, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - A cease-fire between American forces and insurgents loyal to a rebel cleric appeared to be unraveling as fighting erupted yesterday and early today in the centers of the cities of Najaf and Kufa. Three U.S. soldiers were killed and two others were injured in separate engagements ,the military said today. Two of the soldiers were killed yesterday near Kufa, where insurgents loyal to the 31-year-old radical cleric Motqada al-Sadr have clashed with U.S. troops. One soldier died when attackers ambushed a patrol while the other was killed when a rocket-propelled grenade struck his tank.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 29, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - A day after the declaration of a much-heralded truce between U.S. soldiers and forces loyal to a rebel Shiite cleric, battles broke out in the city of Kufa, killing at least five militiamen. Each side accused the other of shooting first, but both said they intended to honor the truce. The clashes took place between patrols run by the 1st Armored Division and members of the Mahdi Army, the militia led by Muqtada al-Sadr, the 31-year-old radical cleric. Large bands of militiamen armed with AK-47s and heavy weapons, including rocket-propelled grenade launchers, roamed the streets of Kufa and neighboring Najaf.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 24, 2004
KUFA, Iraq - The doors they can fix. But no one is sure how yesterday's raid at a Kufa mosque will play with a local population that has learned to live side by side with rebel Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr's al-Mahdi Army fighters. Less than 12 hours after U.S. forces completed their early-morning sweep at the al-Sahleh mosque - uncovering a weapons cache and killing 32 rebel fighters citywide - civil affairs and psychological operations teams returned to the site to assess the damage and take the city's pulse.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 17, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - A U.S. soldier who has been missing for a week since his fuel convoy was attacked west of Baghdad was seen on a videotape yesterday being held captive by six armed and masked men. The family of the soldier, Pfc. Keith Maupin, 20, of Batavia, Ohio, confirmed his identity. A voice speaking in Arabic on the tape, first shown on the Arab news network al-Jazeera, said Maupin was being held to trade for Iraqi prisoners in the hands of Americans. Maupin, who identified himself on the tape, was dressed in fatigues and a floppy desert hat and shown looking down, chewing on his lip nervously.
NEWS
By Samson Mulugeta and Samson Mulugeta,NEWSDAY | June 4, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - The one man in Iraq with the power to single-handedly scuttle the new U.S.-backed interim government gave it a guarded but crucial endorsement yesterday. The statement from Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani came on a day when the United Nation's Security Council wrangled over the scope of Iraq's sovereignty and its control over security forces after June 30. Meanwhile, in the southern city of Kufa, sporadic fighting continued between U.S. forces and the militia of renegade cleric Muqtada al-Sadr, killing six Iraqis and wounding 11. In Baghdad, as well, there was no respite from the violence as mortar rounds rained on a busy thoroughfare near the Italian Embassy.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 31, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - A cease-fire between American forces and insurgents loyal to a rebel cleric appeared to be unraveling as fighting erupted yesterday and early today in the centers of the cities of Najaf and Kufa. Three U.S. soldiers were killed and two others were injured in separate engagements ,the military said today. Two of the soldiers were killed yesterday near Kufa, where insurgents loyal to the 31-year-old radical cleric Motqada al-Sadr have clashed with U.S. troops. One soldier died when attackers ambushed a patrol while the other was killed when a rocket-propelled grenade struck his tank.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 6, 2004
KUFA, Iraq - The Grand Mosque of Kufa has now become the grand arsenal. Yesterday, as U.S. authorities issued an arrest warrant for Muqtada al-Sadr, the radical Shiite cleric who set off the most serious insurrection against the occupation forces, hundreds of his supporters were busy fortifying the mosque with heavy weapons, bracing for a U.S. invasion. Al-Sadr has barricaded himself inside the golden brick walls, refusing to surrender. His militia is prowling the streets, staring down the sights of machine guns, building fighting positions in and around the mosque, the town's biggest, and pointing rocket-propelled grenades at the highway heading north - the road they expect to see U.S. forces come rumbling down.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 5, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Muqtada al-Sadr, the radical young Shiite cleric, has been spewing invective and threatening widespread insurrection for months while U.S. occupation authorities have been focused on a more moderate Shiite leader, Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Husseini al-Sistani. At the same time, al-Sadr was amassing an army. Yesterday, he unleashed it. At his word, thousands of disciples, wearing green headbands and carrying automatic rifles, stormed into the streets of several cities and set off the most widespread mayhem of the occupation.
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