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By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2013
I hear a new bug that eats kudzu is coming to Maryland. Isn't that a good thing, since kudzu is an invasive plant? Kudzu bug was found on kudzu in three Maryland counties; unfortunately it won't stay there. This dark, quarter-inch, squarish bug also feeds on soybeans or other beans, and in winter will aggregate on homes similarly to the other new invasive house pest, the brown marmorated stinkbug. It's a good incentive to rid Maryland of its kudzu patches once and for all. For more information or to report the spread of this non-native bug, go to mdkudzubug.org I transplanted some hostas, and now they have white blotches on the leaves.
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By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2013
I hear a new bug that eats kudzu is coming to Maryland. Isn't that a good thing, since kudzu is an invasive plant? Kudzu bug was found on kudzu in three Maryland counties; unfortunately it won't stay there. This dark, quarter-inch, squarish bug also feeds on soybeans or other beans, and in winter will aggregate on homes similarly to the other new invasive house pest, the brown marmorated stinkbug. It's a good incentive to rid Maryland of its kudzu patches once and for all. For more information or to report the spread of this non-native bug, go to mdkudzubug.org I transplanted some hostas, and now they have white blotches on the leaves.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 10, 2007
CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. -- Summer is settling onto Missionary Ridge, which overlooks this southeast Tennessee city. Swallows glide on the warm breeze rustling the hackberry trees, kudzu vines sprout along the hillside, and the goats are back at work. Chattanooga's goats have become unofficial city mascots since the Public Works Department decided last year to let them roam a city-owned section of the ridge to nibble on the kudzu, the fast-growing vine that throttles many a Southern landscape.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | October 10, 2012
In an age when there are "baby apps" for the iPad and HBO is reissuing classic children's books as made-for-TV musicals, it's nice just to take the kids to visit some goats. Some hard-working, big-eating goats. My husband and I spent a weekend soloing as handlers for Mikey, the 22-month-old grandson with the halo of blond curls, and when a friend spotted a herd of goats along the side of a road, we were off. There's nothing toddlers like more than barnyard animals that are roughly the same size they are. "Goats!
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | June 12, 2005
Some time ago, you had a letter from a woman who was drinking too much wine in the evening and wanted to cut back. You told her about a tea or an herbal concoction to diminish her desire to drink. She had tried it and was thrilled with the results. What was it? She took kudzu-root extract (available in health-food stores). Kudzu (Pueraria lobata) is famous as an invasive vine in the South. In its native China, kudzu has long been used to help people control their desire for alcohol. New research (Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, May 2005)
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 11, 2000
CAHABA HEIGHTS, Ala. - Driving along Red Mountain Highway, Bob Burks spotted the invasive alien. The leafy green monster long ago left its wooded lair for an embankment within sight of a suburban shopping center. Burks pulled over for a closer look. The 82-year-old retired chemist named the beast. Wife Mary, a few months shy of 80, concurred. There's no mistaking this exotic pest. Predatory. Prolific. Pueraria lobata. Kudzu. "When you see this wall of green crawling all over everything, it is like a science-fiction movie," she says, peering out the car window to the kudzu-covered slope.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 31, 1998
Kudzu, the vine, is an insidious plant, but "Kudzu," the musical, is a gentle, amiable creature.This light satire of things Southern, receiving a pleasing world premiere at Ford's Theatre in Washington, is a joint venture by Jack Herrick and Bland Simpson, two members of the string band the Red Clay Ramblers, and Doug Marlette, the Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist whose comic strip about a teen-age boy named "Kudzu" is syndicated in 300 newspapers,...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 7, 1997
GERMANIA SPRINGS, Ala. -- Now and again, Paul Williams will drive past a tangle of deep green kudzu vines and think how pretty it smells."It won't bloom unless it can climb, and it smells like grapes," said Williams, a 75-year-old farmer who is widely respected in this slow, lush corner of the world for his knowledge of important things, like good tomatoes, tall alfalfa and intelligent dogs.He knows a bit about kudzu, too, a species of crawling weed introduced to the United States from Asia in 1876.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | March 5, 1998
"Kudzu: A Southern Musical," based on Doug Marlette's nationally syndicated comic strip, is making its world premiere at Ford's Theatre in Washington, opening Tuesday.Set in the fictional town of Bypass, U.S.A., "Kudzu" is a romantic comedy created by Marlette, the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist for Newsday, together with Jack Herrick and Bland Simpson, both members of the Red Clay Ramblers, the North Carolina string band that performs the musical's score. The cast is headed by James Ludwig as Kudzu Dubose, a young man who aspires to become a writer and who, along with his friends, uncovers a web of intrigue involving the owner of the town mill.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | October 10, 2012
In an age when there are "baby apps" for the iPad and HBO is reissuing classic children's books as made-for-TV musicals, it's nice just to take the kids to visit some goats. Some hard-working, big-eating goats. My husband and I spent a weekend soloing as handlers for Mikey, the 22-month-old grandson with the halo of blond curls, and when a friend spotted a herd of goats along the side of a road, we were off. There's nothing toddlers like more than barnyard animals that are roughly the same size they are. "Goats!
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 10, 2007
CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. -- Summer is settling onto Missionary Ridge, which overlooks this southeast Tennessee city. Swallows glide on the warm breeze rustling the hackberry trees, kudzu vines sprout along the hillside, and the goats are back at work. Chattanooga's goats have become unofficial city mascots since the Public Works Department decided last year to let them roam a city-owned section of the ridge to nibble on the kudzu, the fast-growing vine that throttles many a Southern landscape.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | September 30, 2005
Are there any herbal remedies for alcoholism or alcohol abuse? Yes. An extract from the kudzu vine - which grows wild all over the South, and in China and Japan - appears to be effective at reducing the amount of alcohol a person drinks, according to a placebo-controlled study published this spring by researchers at McLean Hospital in Belmont, Mass. The only catch is that the formulation of kudzu that proved effective in the study is not yet available in health food stores, though it may be within a year.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | June 12, 2005
Some time ago, you had a letter from a woman who was drinking too much wine in the evening and wanted to cut back. You told her about a tea or an herbal concoction to diminish her desire to drink. She had tried it and was thrilled with the results. What was it? She took kudzu-root extract (available in health-food stores). Kudzu (Pueraria lobata) is famous as an invasive vine in the South. In its native China, kudzu has long been used to help people control their desire for alcohol. New research (Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, May 2005)
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | October 19, 2004
CHICAGO - Congress has just passed one of the most important pieces of legislation of the year, dealing with corporate taxes, and, as a concerned citizen, you may feel slightly uninformed for not knowing what's in it. But don't be too hard on yourself: Your representatives don't know either. How could they? At 633 pages, the measure is longer and heavier than a Swedish film festival - and about as intelligible to the average American. Unless, that is, the average American has an advanced degree in accounting, allowing sense to be made of provisions relating to, say, "look-thru rules to apply to dividends from non-controlled 902 corporations."
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 8, 2001
DECORAH, Iowa - Paul Scott can tick off numerous reasons to oppose the building of a Wal-Mart Supercenter on a one-time cornfield here: aesthetic (invites sprawl), environmental (parking lot runoff will pollute the river) and economic (kills off competition). For all his objections, though, he is no stranger to the checkout lanes of the old Wal-Mart in town, one of those familiar blue-and-gray buildings that have become as recognizable as McDonald's arches, and seemingly as ubiquitous.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 11, 2000
CAHABA HEIGHTS, Ala. - Driving along Red Mountain Highway, Bob Burks spotted the invasive alien. The leafy green monster long ago left its wooded lair for an embankment within sight of a suburban shopping center. Burks pulled over for a closer look. The 82-year-old retired chemist named the beast. Wife Mary, a few months shy of 80, concurred. There's no mistaking this exotic pest. Predatory. Prolific. Pueraria lobata. Kudzu. "When you see this wall of green crawling all over everything, it is like a science-fiction movie," she says, peering out the car window to the kudzu-covered slope.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | October 19, 2004
CHICAGO - Congress has just passed one of the most important pieces of legislation of the year, dealing with corporate taxes, and, as a concerned citizen, you may feel slightly uninformed for not knowing what's in it. But don't be too hard on yourself: Your representatives don't know either. How could they? At 633 pages, the measure is longer and heavier than a Swedish film festival - and about as intelligible to the average American. Unless, that is, the average American has an advanced degree in accounting, allowing sense to be made of provisions relating to, say, "look-thru rules to apply to dividends from non-controlled 902 corporations."
FEATURES
By MIKE KLINGAMAN | August 16, 1992
Vines give me the creeps. I don't trust them. Vines grow too fast and they always want to grab onto things. Mostly they stick to walls and trees, but who knows? I couldn't sleep if I thought vines were scrambling up the side of my house.My mother shares my concern. A 40-year veteran of the `f honeysuckle wars, her goal is to drive the stubborn vines from her yard. But the honeysuckle won't die. Two new plants appear for every one she digs up.To Mom, vines are the boogeymen of the botanical world.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 31, 1998
Kudzu, the vine, is an insidious plant, but "Kudzu," the musical, is a gentle, amiable creature.This light satire of things Southern, receiving a pleasing world premiere at Ford's Theatre in Washington, is a joint venture by Jack Herrick and Bland Simpson, two members of the string band the Red Clay Ramblers, and Doug Marlette, the Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist whose comic strip about a teen-age boy named "Kudzu" is syndicated in 300 newspapers,...
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | March 5, 1998
"Kudzu: A Southern Musical," based on Doug Marlette's nationally syndicated comic strip, is making its world premiere at Ford's Theatre in Washington, opening Tuesday.Set in the fictional town of Bypass, U.S.A., "Kudzu" is a romantic comedy created by Marlette, the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist for Newsday, together with Jack Herrick and Bland Simpson, both members of the Red Clay Ramblers, the North Carolina string band that performs the musical's score. The cast is headed by James Ludwig as Kudzu Dubose, a young man who aspires to become a writer and who, along with his friends, uncovers a web of intrigue involving the owner of the town mill.
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