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By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,Sun reporter | March 26, 2008
City police investigators examined yesterday the computer hard drive used by a white commander accused of ordering a black sergeant to watch online Ku Klux Klan videos, according to three sources familiar with the investigation. Sterling Clifford, a spokesman for the Police Department and the mayor's office, said that the police commissioner briefed Mayor Sheila Dixon on Monday night and yesterday morning on a federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission complaint stemming from the alleged incident, but he declined to comment further on the matter.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2013
On a Civil War battlefield where tens of thousands of men clashed fifteen decades ago, eight Ku Klux Klan members unfurled their group's banner Saturday afternoon and called for a new uprising to oust President Barack Obama. The Klansmen — who jostled for numerical superiority with a herd of cows grazing nearby — were watched by officers from the United States Park Police and about 15 spectators, as one of them explained how he believes Obama's foreign, economic and immigration policies are threatening America.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 18, 2000
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - Nearly 37 years after a bombing that horrified the nation, authorities here charged two longtime suspects with murder yesterday in the deaths of four black girls in the explosion at Birmingham's 16th Street Baptist Church. Thomas E. Blanton Jr. and Bobby Frank Cherry, both of whom were affiliated with the Ku Klux Klan and have been considered suspects for decades in the 1963 bombing, turned themselves in yesterday morning after being indicted by a state grand jury Tuesday.
NEWS
June 30, 2010
I was shocked by your report of Sen. Barbara Mikulski's effusive praise for the late senator and one-time Klansman Robert Byrd. It demonstrated her detachment from a vast segment of Marylanders and her supreme confidence in easy re-election. Senator Mikulski represents Maryland, the native soil of Frederick Douglass and Thurgood Marshall; the home of America's most venerable and venerated African-American newspaper; the cradle of a civil rights movement that got its sea legs in Baltimore and changed our nation.
NEWS
October 5, 1998
Gary Thomas Rowe Jr., 64, an FBI informer who infiltrated the Ku Klux Klan during the civil rights struggles of the 1960s, died of a heart attack four months ago in Savannah, Ga.He was buried under the name of Thomas Neal Moore, the identity that federal authorities helped him to assume in 1965 after he testified against Klansmen who were accused of killing Viola Gregg Liuzzo, a civil rights volunteer.Mr. Rowe's death became known last week when a television crew shooting footage for a program about the FBI and the Ku Klux Klan searched for him in Savannah, only to learn that he had died May 25. Eugene Brooks, who had been Mr. Rowe's lawyer, confirmed the death.
NEWS
April 15, 2010
Despite the rather reasonable positions set forth by the spokesman for the tea party group in Thursday's Sun ("Tea party, 1 year later," April 15), it appears to me from having attended one demonstration and from observations on TV that this is a dangerous and destructive movement. Like the Ku Klux Klan and Aryan nation/skinhead movements before, it is composed of misinformed individuals full of hatred and anger who spread wild conspiracy tales and demonize those with whom they disagree.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 15, 1999
A man dressed in Ku Klux Klan attire scared three black children playing basketball Sunday night in Savage, and Howard County police are investigating whether he might be responsible for a rash of "KKK" graffiti."
NEWS
November 6, 2006
Samuel H. Bowers, 82, Ku Klux Klan leader Samuel H. Bowers, a former Ku Klux Klan imperial wizard who was serving a life sentence for the 1966 bombing death of a civil rights leader, died after suffering cardiopulmonary arrest yesterday in the Mississippi State Penitentiary Hospital in Parchman. He was convicted in August 1998 of ordering the assassination of Vernon Dahmer, a civil rights activist who had fought for black rights during Mississippi's turbulent struggle for racial equality.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | September 13, 1995
An Aberdeen family and an Edgewood businessman, both black, have received offensive correspondence within the last week that is purported to be from the Ku Klux Klan. The Harford County Sheriff's Office is investigating the incidents.One occurred yesterday, when Kimbal McCoy, 46, owner of Bits & Pieces Thrift Shop in Edgewood, found a business card on the door to his store on Edgewood Road. Mr. McCoy said it read: "You have been paid a social visit by the knights of the KKK. Don't make the next visit a business call."
NEWS
By Kenneth Lavon Johnson | June 26, 2005
THE DAY James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner disappeared, June 21, 1964, I was a young officer in the U.S. Army Judge Advocate General Corps, serving in the Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) with the 1st Calvary Division. News from the United States was hard to come by because we had no television, radio or newspapers except the military's Stars and Stripes, which the Army gave us monthly. I first learned, through another black officer, of the murders of the three civil rights activists after their bodies had been found 44 days after their disappearance.
NEWS
April 15, 2010
Despite the rather reasonable positions set forth by the spokesman for the tea party group in Thursday's Sun ("Tea party, 1 year later," April 15), it appears to me from having attended one demonstration and from observations on TV that this is a dangerous and destructive movement. Like the Ku Klux Klan and Aryan nation/skinhead movements before, it is composed of misinformed individuals full of hatred and anger who spread wild conspiracy tales and demonize those with whom they disagree.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,Sun reporter | March 26, 2008
City police investigators examined yesterday the computer hard drive used by a white commander accused of ordering a black sergeant to watch online Ku Klux Klan videos, according to three sources familiar with the investigation. Sterling Clifford, a spokesman for the Police Department and the mayor's office, said that the police commissioner briefed Mayor Sheila Dixon on Monday night and yesterday morning on a federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission complaint stemming from the alleged incident, but he declined to comment further on the matter.
NEWS
November 6, 2006
Samuel H. Bowers, 82, Ku Klux Klan leader Samuel H. Bowers, a former Ku Klux Klan imperial wizard who was serving a life sentence for the 1966 bombing death of a civil rights leader, died after suffering cardiopulmonary arrest yesterday in the Mississippi State Penitentiary Hospital in Parchman. He was convicted in August 1998 of ordering the assassination of Vernon Dahmer, a civil rights activist who had fought for black rights during Mississippi's turbulent struggle for racial equality.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 11, 2005
WASHINGTON - An advertisement that a leading abortion-rights organization began running on national television yesterday, opposing Supreme Court nominee John G. Roberts Jr. as one "whose ideology leads him to excuse violence against other Americans," quickly became the first flash point in the three-week-old confirmation process. Several prominent abortion-rights supporters and a neutral media watchdog group called the ad misleading and unfair, and a conservative group quickly took to the airwaves with an ad countering it. The 30-second spot - which NARAL Pro-Choice America is spending $500,000 to place on the Fox and CNN cable networks, and on broadcast stations in Maine and Rhode Island over the next two weeks - focuses on an argument Roberts made to the Supreme Court in an abortion-related case in the early 1990s, when he was principal deputy solicitor general working in the administration of the first President Bush.
NEWS
By Kenneth Lavon Johnson | June 26, 2005
THE DAY James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner disappeared, June 21, 1964, I was a young officer in the U.S. Army Judge Advocate General Corps, serving in the Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) with the 1st Calvary Division. News from the United States was hard to come by because we had no television, radio or newspapers except the military's Stars and Stripes, which the Army gave us monthly. I first learned, through another black officer, of the murders of the three civil rights activists after their bodies had been found 44 days after their disappearance.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 18, 2000
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - Nearly 37 years after a bombing that horrified the nation, authorities here charged two longtime suspects with murder yesterday in the deaths of four black girls in the explosion at Birmingham's 16th Street Baptist Church. Thomas E. Blanton Jr. and Bobby Frank Cherry, both of whom were affiliated with the Ku Klux Klan and have been considered suspects for decades in the 1963 bombing, turned themselves in yesterday morning after being indicted by a state grand jury Tuesday.
NEWS
January 30, 2000
Harold H. Greene, 76, judge in AT&T breakup case U.S. District Judge Harold H. Greene, 76, who oversaw the breakup of AT&T as a jurist and played a key role in shaping two of the nation's landmark civil rights laws as a government attorney, died yesterday in Washington. Judge Greene, who succumbed to a cerebral hemorrhage at his home, spent more than three decades as a judge on District of Columbia and federal courts, presiding over hundreds of cases. But his name is most attached to the 1984 AT&T breakup, the largest antitrust case in U.S. history.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2013
On a Civil War battlefield where tens of thousands of men clashed fifteen decades ago, eight Ku Klux Klan members unfurled their group's banner Saturday afternoon and called for a new uprising to oust President Barack Obama. The Klansmen — who jostled for numerical superiority with a herd of cows grazing nearby — were watched by officers from the United States Park Police and about 15 spectators, as one of them explained how he believes Obama's foreign, economic and immigration policies are threatening America.
NEWS
January 30, 2000
Harold H. Greene, 76, judge in AT&T breakup case U.S. District Judge Harold H. Greene, 76, who oversaw the breakup of AT&T as a jurist and played a key role in shaping two of the nation's landmark civil rights laws as a government attorney, died yesterday in Washington. Judge Greene, who succumbed to a cerebral hemorrhage at his home, spent more than three decades as a judge on District of Columbia and federal courts, presiding over hundreds of cases. But his name is most attached to the 1984 AT&T breakup, the largest antitrust case in U.S. history.
NEWS
September 3, 1999
Rights that protect hate groups safeguard everyone's freedoms Two recent letters criticized the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) for its efforts to protect free speech and privacy ("Protecting hate and guns fosters a killing society," Aug. 24). Both letters suggested that the ACLU is somehow responsible for recent acts of violence throughout the county. The ACLU, like most citizens, was horrified by these acts of terror. In no way do we support the doctrines behind these violent acts or these hateful actions.
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