Advertisement
HomeCollectionsKryuchkov
IN THE NEWS

Kryuchkov

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Alison Mitchell and Alison Mitchell,Newsday | October 26, 1991
MOSCOW -- Former KGB chief Vladimir Kryuchkov began planning the coup against Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev as early as late December, but he overestimated the passivity of the Soviet people and assumed they would be easily intimidated by tanks, a senior KGB official said yesterday.Maj. Gen. Anatoly Oleinikov, a KGB officer for 24 years, said a KGB internal investigation showed that six more senior KGB officials had been involved in the coup and could be arrested soon. Fourteen people have already been charged with treason, among them Mr. Kryuchkov and four other officers of the KGB secret service.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Alison Mitchell and Alison Mitchell,Newsday | October 26, 1991
MOSCOW -- Former KGB chief Vladimir Kryuchkov began planning the coup against Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev as early as late December, but he overestimated the passivity of the Soviet people and assumed they would be easily intimidated by tanks, a senior KGB official said yesterday.Maj. Gen. Anatoly Oleinikov, a KGB officer for 24 years, said a KGB internal investigation showed that six more senior KGB officials had been involved in the coup and could be arrested soon. Fourteen people have already been charged with treason, among them Mr. Kryuchkov and four other officers of the KGB secret service.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | December 23, 1990
MOSCOW -- On the offensive two days after the resignation of reformist Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze, KGB chief Vladimir A. Kryuchkov accused the CIA yesterday of trying to destabilize the Soviet Union and suggested that the country must be prepared for more bloodshed if order is to be restored.Mr. Kryuchkov's 25-minute speech to the Congress of People's Deputies was an extraordinary throwback to the Cold War rhetoric and enemy-hunting at home and abroad that were familiar here for decades before the reforms of President Mikhail S. Gorbachev.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | August 28, 1991
MOSCOW -- All this coup business has the KGB rather put out. They'd been working tirelessly to improve their image, and then their boss gets himself arrested for overthrowing the government."
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | June 30, 1991
MOSCOW -- With his hard-line Communist aides hystericall demanding order at any price and his long-time reformist colleagues quietly helping to organize a non-Communist opposition party, Mikhail S. Gorbachev has a tough choice to make.The man who for six years has tacked now right, now left, trying to define a centrist route through stormy Soviet political waters, is finding his crew mates split into two bitterly opposed camps.The two groups are now grappling for the helm, and the approach of Mr. Gorbachev's mid-July meeting with leaders of the seven top industrial powers appears to be bringing the struggle to a climax.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | December 16, 1990
MOSCOW -- With the Soviet Union's existence threatened by economic disintegration and republican nationalism, Mikhail S. Gorbachev is showing signs of veering from his reformist path and retreating to the traditional triad on which Soviet totalitarianism was based: the Communist Party, the Soviet army and the KGB.Whether his retreat is tactical or strategic is a matter of heated debate. Mr. Gorbachev often has zigged to the right, the better to zag to the left a little later. The overall result of his six years in power has been the steady dismantling of the world Josef V. Stalin built.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | August 28, 1991
MOSCOW -- All this coup business has the KGB rather put out. They'd been working tirelessly to improve their image, and then their boss gets himself arrested for overthrowing the government."
NEWS
November 27, 2007
VLADIMIR KRYUCHKOV, 83 Former KGB chief Vladimir Kryuchkov, the former KGB chief who spearheaded a failed coup against Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev, died Friday in Moscow of an unspecified illness, according to the Federal Security Service, the main KGB successor agency. Mr. Kryuchkov started working with the KGB in 1967. Seven years later, he was named chief of the KGB's First Main Directorate, in charge of spying abroad. In 1988, Mr. Gorbachev appointed Mr. Kryuchkov as KGB chief.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | February 3, 1991
MOSCOW -- Vladimir A. Kryuchkov, chief of the Soviet KGB, is a busy man. But he found time last week to meet with the leaders of the Centrist Bloc of Political Parties and Movements, one of the most dubious of the dozens of political groups to spring up in this country over the last two years."
NEWS
By IRA L. STRAUS | July 14, 1991
New York -- KGB chief Vladimir Kryuchkov, in a closed-door speech to the U.S.S.R. Supreme Soviet June 18, accused Western intelligence services planning for ''pacification and even occupation'' of the Soviet Union, on the ''pretext'' of keeping Soviet nuclear forces under control. The West was imposing demands of drastic economic changes; perestroika was being done as a favor to the West, in the ''illusion'' that the West would give tens of billions of dollars to make it work. A ''catastrophe'' was brewing, like the Nazi invasion.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | June 30, 1991
MOSCOW -- With his hard-line Communist aides hystericall demanding order at any price and his long-time reformist colleagues quietly helping to organize a non-Communist opposition party, Mikhail S. Gorbachev has a tough choice to make.The man who for six years has tacked now right, now left, trying to define a centrist route through stormy Soviet political waters, is finding his crew mates split into two bitterly opposed camps.The two groups are now grappling for the helm, and the approach of Mr. Gorbachev's mid-July meeting with leaders of the seven top industrial powers appears to be bringing the struggle to a climax.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | December 23, 1990
MOSCOW -- On the offensive two days after the resignation of reformist Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze, KGB chief Vladimir A. Kryuchkov accused the CIA yesterday of trying to destabilize the Soviet Union and suggested that the country must be prepared for more bloodshed if order is to be restored.Mr. Kryuchkov's 25-minute speech to the Congress of People's Deputies was an extraordinary throwback to the Cold War rhetoric and enemy-hunting at home and abroad that were familiar here for decades before the reforms of President Mikhail S. Gorbachev.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | December 16, 1990
MOSCOW -- With the Soviet Union's existence threatened by economic disintegration and republican nationalism, Mikhail S. Gorbachev is showing signs of veering from his reformist path and retreating to the traditional triad on which Soviet totalitarianism was based: the Communist Party, the Soviet army and the KGB.Whether his retreat is tactical or strategic is a matter of heated debate. Mr. Gorbachev often has zigged to the right, the better to zag to the left a little later. The overall result of his six years in power has been the steady dismantling of the world Josef V. Stalin built.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2002
In the month that he has been on trial for treason, Oleg D. Kalugin has spent weekends at his Ocean City condo with his daughter and 12-year-old grandson, who are visiting from Moscow. He has gone for his usual long-distance ocean swims. Back in Washington, the former KGB major general has lectured as usual on Russian politics and intelligence, tended to his consulting business and tried out the new Fresh Fields near his Silver Spring home. And occasionally, Kalugin, 67, has checked the Web for the latest word on his closed trial in Moscow, where he is represented by a lawyer with whom he has never spoken and where a three- judge panel is expected to hand down his sentence today.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | May 18, 1991
MOSCOW -- The anti-Communist opposition movement Democratic Russia denounced yesterday an explosion that wrecked its headquarters Thursday night as "political terrorism," but vowed that it would not derail the campaign of Boris N. Yeltsin for the Russian presidency."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.