Advertisement
HomeCollectionsKruger National Park
IN THE NEWS

Kruger National Park

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 30, 1998
SKUKUZA, South Africa -- Kruger National Park, celebrating its centenary this year, is the newest vehicle for dramatic change post-apartheid South Africa.Under its first black warden, the park's days as a bastion of white male conservationists and rich white tourists are numbered."Kruger cannot be seen outside the context of the rest of the country," says David Mabunda, a former schoolteacher and land manager who was appointed four months ago to turn the 19,000-square-mile park -- bigger than Maryland and Delaware combined, and one of Africa's first game reserves -- into a park for all South Africans, black and white.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 28, 2000
SKUKUSA, South Africa -- To cull or not to cull Kruger's elephants, that is the jumbo-sized dilemma facing officials at South Africa's most famous national park. Five years after they stopped killing elephants to control their numbers, the practice is again under consideration. When public pressure forced a halt in culling in 1995, Kruger National Park had an elephant population of 7,806, not too much above what was then considered the ideal, 7,000. Today it has 9,152. A new elephant-management policy, ready for implementation, opens the way for renewed culling by shooting the animals from a helicopter.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | May 24, 1995
KRUGER NATIONAL PARK, South Africa -- To the tens of thousands of people who enter it each year, Kruger National Park offers the chance to mingle with lions, elephants and the other wild beasts of Africa. But for the impoverished millions of black people who live on the park's border, it represents an anachronistic bastion of white privilege.For generations, the people on the outside of the park's electrified fence have been like street urchins with their noses pressed up against the window of a showplace.
TRAVEL
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite, and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 26, 1999
SABI SABI, South Africa -- A silent, moonlit night in the African bush. Out of the gloom, vague shapes emerge: lions.They are in a V-formation: intent, looking for their next meal. It is the end of winter, hard times out here. They are lean, not to say skeletal, inasmuch as you can see their ribs. Hungry, certainly.They follow the lead of the dominant female. One by one, they settle down for a moment, then get up, advance, settle down. It is the rhythm of remorselessness. They are stalking.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 1, 1996
KRUGER NATIONAL PARK, South Africa -- A few weeks ago, South Africans awoke to an alarming headline: Kruger National Park was ablaze. The park, 7,300 square miles that stretch along South Africa's border with Mozambique, is one of the premier game reserves on the continent.The first reports were that thousands of animals were killed as grass fires swept across the park's southern section, the most heavily visited part. Much as when fires roared through Yellowstone National Park in the United States, officials were criticized for their policy of letting the fires burn themselves out.Lightning started the fires, and thus the decision by park officials not to interfere.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 28, 2000
SKUKUSA, South Africa -- To cull or not to cull Kruger's elephants, that is the jumbo-sized dilemma facing officials at South Africa's most famous national park. Five years after they stopped killing elephants to control their numbers, the practice is again under consideration. When public pressure forced a halt in culling in 1995, Kruger National Park had an elephant population of 7,806, not too much above what was then considered the ideal, 7,000. Today it has 9,152. A new elephant-management policy, ready for implementation, opens the way for renewed culling by shooting the animals from a helicopter.
TRAVEL
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite, and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 26, 1999
SABI SABI, South Africa -- A silent, moonlit night in the African bush. Out of the gloom, vague shapes emerge: lions.They are in a V-formation: intent, looking for their next meal. It is the end of winter, hard times out here. They are lean, not to say skeletal, inasmuch as you can see their ribs. Hungry, certainly.They follow the lead of the dominant female. One by one, they settle down for a moment, then get up, advance, settle down. It is the rhythm of remorselessness. They are stalking.
TRAVEL
February 1, 2009
I live in Owings Mills and traveled last fall to South Africa. This photo was taken on a visit to the Sabi Sands Private Game Reserve near Kruger National Park. This leopard had just eaten some of its "kill," hence the red around its mouth. He was stunning to watch and never cared that our jeep was so close. A magnificent experience. The Baltimore Sun welcomes submissions for "My Best Shot." Photos should have been taken within the past year and be accompanied by a description of when and where you took the picture and your name, address and phone number.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 13, 1994
KRUGER NATIONAL PARK, South Africa -- Officials and wildlife experts from South Africa are seeking permission to do what was considered unthinkable a few years ago: trade products made from the hide and hair of elephants and rhinos.At an international convention on endangered species under way in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., they'll also ask permission to market elephant meat.While there continues to be worldwide concern over the dwindling numbers of African elephants, the opposite problem exists at parks like this one. The beasts are so prolific that if their numbers aren't controlled, they will destroy the park.
TRAVEL
By San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News | April 1, 2007
We'd like to plan a safari to Kenya, Tanzania or South Africa on our own, without a travel agent. Any suggestions on arranging a first-class trip? Also, what are the best times to visit? If you'd prefer to contact a tour operator, companies such as Abercrombie & Kent (abercrom biekent.com) and Mountain Travel Sobek (mtso bek.com) offer safaris ranging from a four-day trip to Kruger National Park in South Africa starting at $2,390 per person to a 15-day safari in east Africa that includes Serengeti National Park and the Masai Mara Game Reserve for $15,000.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 30, 1998
SKUKUZA, South Africa -- Kruger National Park, celebrating its centenary this year, is the newest vehicle for dramatic change post-apartheid South Africa.Under its first black warden, the park's days as a bastion of white male conservationists and rich white tourists are numbered."Kruger cannot be seen outside the context of the rest of the country," says David Mabunda, a former schoolteacher and land manager who was appointed four months ago to turn the 19,000-square-mile park -- bigger than Maryland and Delaware combined, and one of Africa's first game reserves -- into a park for all South Africans, black and white.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 1, 1996
KRUGER NATIONAL PARK, South Africa -- A few weeks ago, South Africans awoke to an alarming headline: Kruger National Park was ablaze. The park, 7,300 square miles that stretch along South Africa's border with Mozambique, is one of the premier game reserves on the continent.The first reports were that thousands of animals were killed as grass fires swept across the park's southern section, the most heavily visited part. Much as when fires roared through Yellowstone National Park in the United States, officials were criticized for their policy of letting the fires burn themselves out.Lightning started the fires, and thus the decision by park officials not to interfere.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | May 24, 1995
KRUGER NATIONAL PARK, South Africa -- To the tens of thousands of people who enter it each year, Kruger National Park offers the chance to mingle with lions, elephants and the other wild beasts of Africa. But for the impoverished millions of black people who live on the park's border, it represents an anachronistic bastion of white privilege.For generations, the people on the outside of the park's electrified fence have been like street urchins with their noses pressed up against the window of a showplace.
TRAVEL
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE AND KNIGHT RIDDER NEWSPAPERS | February 19, 2006
Can you recommend an agency that specializes in travel to Africa? I'm looking for a specialized trip to Namibia, Cape Town and Kruger National Park in South Africa. Mountain Travel Sobek in Emeryville, Calif., and Big Five Tours and Expeditions, based in Stuart, Fla., can arrange customized tours. We asked them to suggest possible itineraries for you. Nadia Le Bon at Mountain Sobek (mtsobek.com) suggested beginning your trip at Cape Grace (www.capegrace.com), a small luxury hotel in Cape Town and a good base to visit Robben Island and the wine country.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 9, 2001
KRUGER NATIONAL PARK, South Africa - Long before colonial powers carved up Southern Africa into its current political boundaries, the region's abundant wildlife roamed without a care - free of armed border posts, electrified fencing and other disruptions to their ancient migration and grazing patterns. Soon Africa's elephants, buffalo, lions and other animals may reclaim some of that unspoiled past. A new conservation effort is under way to pull down fences between Southern Africa's adjoining national parks and game reserves, opening up the continent to vast new wildlife areas that straddle political borders.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.