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By Justin Davidson and Justin Davidson,NEWSDAY | October 18, 1998
SAN FRANCISCO - David Harrington, a 48-year old violinist with the serious, sleep-deprived look and conversational urgency a late-blooming adolescent, is the founder and designated visionary of the Kronos Quartet, but that's not exactly how he describes himself."
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 11, 2007
On the same day that Osama bin Laden happened to release another defiant tape, a sizable audience gathered at the Clarice Smith Center in College Park for a provocative presentation by the Kronos Quartet titled Awakening: A Musical Mediation on the Anniversary of 9/11. Alternately moving, confrontational, reflective and exasperating, the 13-part work, brilliantly performed Friday night, brings together music from a variety of sources, cultures and times to create a roughly 100-minute exercise in performance art. It was first performed last year in San Francisco.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | November 22, 1992
It started out simply enough, with a cover of a Hendrix tune. This was the sort of tribute rock bands tossed off without thinking, and barely anyone would bat an eye at finding a version of, say, "Little Wing" tacked onto an album by Pearl Jam or Guns N' Roses.But when a rendition of "Purple Haze" turned up at the end of a 1986 album by the Kronos Quartet, it was enough to turn the music world on its head. Kronos, after all, is a string quartet, and as almost everyone is aware, string quartets aren't in the habit of covering Hendrix tunes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | November 15, 2001
Steve Reich Steve Reich: Triple Quartet and other works. Kronos Quartet; Dominic Frasca, electric guitarist; and others. (Nonesuch 79546-2) Pundits who predicted that the musical style known as minimalism would quickly fade away have a lot of repeated chords to eat. Steve Reich, Philip Glass and John Adams - the minimalist holy trinity - are still going strong, and their ideas about limited harmonic motion and rhythmic reiteration continue to influence many...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | November 15, 2001
Steve Reich Steve Reich: Triple Quartet and other works. Kronos Quartet; Dominic Frasca, electric guitarist; and others. (Nonesuch 79546-2) Pundits who predicted that the musical style known as minimalism would quickly fade away have a lot of repeated chords to eat. Steve Reich, Philip Glass and John Adams - the minimalist holy trinity - are still going strong, and their ideas about limited harmonic motion and rhythmic reiteration continue to influence many...
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 1, 2001
The Kronos Quartet has been challenging the conventions of chamber music and the concert hall for nearly 30 years now. Most of those conventions are still standing, and a lot of what once was terribly radical in a typical Kronos program now seems quite tame. But the ensemble still has a niche and a following, still has a lot to offer those seeking a taste of novelty. On Sunday evening, presented as the season-closer by the Shriver Hall Concert Series, the quartet offered an eclectic sampling of repertoire, most of it fashioned specifically for Kronos.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 11, 2007
On the same day that Osama bin Laden happened to release another defiant tape, a sizable audience gathered at the Clarice Smith Center in College Park for a provocative presentation by the Kronos Quartet titled Awakening: A Musical Mediation on the Anniversary of 9/11. Alternately moving, confrontational, reflective and exasperating, the 13-part work, brilliantly performed Friday night, brings together music from a variety of sources, cultures and times to create a roughly 100-minute exercise in performance art. It was first performed last year in San Francisco.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | June 2, 1991
Twenty-five years is not long as the lives of musical institutions go. But because the Shriver Hall Concert Series is so important to music in Baltimore, its 25th anniversary -- which will be celebrated Saturday with a gala concert by the Kronos Quartet -- deserves celebration.It is no exaggeration to say that the continued health of the Shriver series -- which presents several recitalists and chamber music groups each season in Shriver Hall on the Homewood campus of the Johns Hopkins University -- is as crucial to Baltimore as that of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 28, 1999
Monsters, Ghosts, Goblins & DemonsThe Essential Halloween Party Collection (Hip-O 314 545 048)Rob Zombie PresentsThe Words & the Music of Frankenstein (Hip-O 021 153 814)DraculaMusic by Philip Glass, performed by Kronos Quartet (Nonesuch 79542)Why is it that some holidays seem more musical than others?There are dozens, if not hundreds of Christmas songs, but can anyone name more than one Easter song? What about Passover? Fourth of July has a host of songs (George M. Cohan's "I'm a Yankee Doodle Dandy," to name just one)
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | June 10, 1991
The key to the Kronos Quartet's appearance at Shriver Hall on Saturday came in the final encore and the audience's response to it. The quartet played its own transcription of Jimi Hendrix's "Purple Haze" and the young audience went berserk with joy.The concert celebrated the 25th anniversary of the chamber music series at Shriver Hall, once a bastion of Germanic seriousness in this city. The Kronos concert -- which used amplification, a set that suggested a TV talk show late in the 21st century and sophisticated lighting -- was an index to how much "serious" music has changed since the Shriver Series was inaugurated.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 1, 2001
The Kronos Quartet has been challenging the conventions of chamber music and the concert hall for nearly 30 years now. Most of those conventions are still standing, and a lot of what once was terribly radical in a typical Kronos program now seems quite tame. But the ensemble still has a niche and a following, still has a lot to offer those seeking a taste of novelty. On Sunday evening, presented as the season-closer by the Shriver Hall Concert Series, the quartet offered an eclectic sampling of repertoire, most of it fashioned specifically for Kronos.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 28, 1999
Monsters, Ghosts, Goblins & DemonsThe Essential Halloween Party Collection (Hip-O 314 545 048)Rob Zombie PresentsThe Words & the Music of Frankenstein (Hip-O 021 153 814)DraculaMusic by Philip Glass, performed by Kronos Quartet (Nonesuch 79542)Why is it that some holidays seem more musical than others?There are dozens, if not hundreds of Christmas songs, but can anyone name more than one Easter song? What about Passover? Fourth of July has a host of songs (George M. Cohan's "I'm a Yankee Doodle Dandy," to name just one)
FEATURES
By Justin Davidson and Justin Davidson,NEWSDAY | October 18, 1998
SAN FRANCISCO - David Harrington, a 48-year old violinist with the serious, sleep-deprived look and conversational urgency a late-blooming adolescent, is the founder and designated visionary of the Kronos Quartet, but that's not exactly how he describes himself."
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | November 22, 1992
It started out simply enough, with a cover of a Hendrix tune. This was the sort of tribute rock bands tossed off without thinking, and barely anyone would bat an eye at finding a version of, say, "Little Wing" tacked onto an album by Pearl Jam or Guns N' Roses.But when a rendition of "Purple Haze" turned up at the end of a 1986 album by the Kronos Quartet, it was enough to turn the music world on its head. Kronos, after all, is a string quartet, and as almost everyone is aware, string quartets aren't in the habit of covering Hendrix tunes.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | June 2, 1991
Twenty-five years is not long as the lives of musical institutions go. But because the Shriver Hall Concert Series is so important to music in Baltimore, its 25th anniversary -- which will be celebrated Saturday with a gala concert by the Kronos Quartet -- deserves celebration.It is no exaggeration to say that the continued health of the Shriver series -- which presents several recitalists and chamber music groups each season in Shriver Hall on the Homewood campus of the Johns Hopkins University -- is as crucial to Baltimore as that of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 21, 2012
Some 40 musicians -- half of them from the Baltimore area -- are scheduled to participate in this weekend's High Zero Festival. From the local musicians, we asked Shelly Blake-Plock to pick three whose performances might offer the most promise. Jimmy Joe Roche: Analog synth, video Roche is a member of the arts collective Wham City. His videos have screened internationally in venues including the Royal Academy of Arts in London, Boston Institute of Contemporary Art and the J. Paul Getty Museum.
NEWS
February 17, 2008
DVD MICHAEL CLAYTON / / Warner Home Video. Available Tuesday. $28.95, $35.99 on Blu-ray. ....................... George Clooney plays the title character, a "fixer" for a big-time New York law firm, in this top-notch Oscar-nominated thriller. Having long-ago mortgaged both his intellect and his conscience to the company store, Clayton finds himself in something of a middle-age quandary: Save for a reputation as a guy who can keep the lid on stuff that could otherwise prove embarrassing to the very powerful, he has nothing to show for all his years of hard work.
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