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By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | January 7, 1995
Early last year, a leading conservative Republican theorist advised his party to declare war on President Clinton's health care reforms by arguing there was no crisis.And just prior to the Nov. 8 midterm elections, the same theorist urged the party to pull out the stops in openly obstructing the entire Clinton agenda, predicting that the strategy would bring big GOP gains.In both endeavors, the advice paid off. Clinton's hopes for sweeping health care reform were buried.And the Republican obstruction of other key aspects of the president's agenda, pursued on grounds that voters had had enough of intrusive government under an unpopular White House Democrat, helped produce the resounding GOP victory Nov. 8 that gave the party control of both houses of Congress for the first time in 40 years.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 15, 2003
WASHINGTON -- The report that Secretary of State Colin L. Powell will step down after President Bush's first term -- dismissed by Mr. Powell as "gossip" -- nevertheless has much logic to it in light of the former general's defensive role in the administration's foreign policy. For all his spoken assurances that he is in lockstep with the president and major administration proponents of the essentially unilateral pre-emptive war against Iraq, Mr. Powell seemingly has been dragged kicking and screaming into the implementation of what is now known as the Bush Doctrine.
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NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | October 4, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The best indication yet that the Republicans believe President Clinton's unpopularity is their ticket to fat congressional gains Nov. 8 may be a memorandum to Republican leaders from Bill Kristol, the former Dan Quayle chief of staff who now heads the new GOP think tank, Project for the Republican Future.All this year, Kristol has been the party's most conspicuous apostle of obstructionism, most notably obstruction of the Clinton health care plan and various offshoots, and of campaign finance reform.
NEWS
By Andrew Bard Schmookler | April 22, 1997
BROADWAY, Va. -- Sometimes I'm alarmed by the judgments I hear people make. But sometimes what troubles me is not the conclusion they reach so much as the ease with which they come to their judgments, as if it were an open-and-shut case. That's how it was on a recent "This Week" program on ABC.As the gang discussed Vice President Gore's trip to China, the conservative pundit William Kristol complained about Mr. Gore's having conceded that, while China's blot is the massacre at Tiananmen Square, the United States, too, has committed great wrongs.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | December 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Whenever one of the national political parties falls on hard times, it's predictable that a new organization will spring up designed to put the losing party onto the correct path to resurrection.That was the case in 1985 when moderate and conservative Democrats, weary of the New Deal retread message conveyed to the electorate by 1984 presidential nominee Walter Mondale and convinced the party had to address the needs of middle-class voters more effectively, formed the Democratic Leadership Council.
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | August 2, 1991
Sen. Paul Simon and others have long argued that our citizensare insular, that few of us learn foreign languages, that the United States is educationally more self-centered than most other Western nations.Foreign journalists are surprised at the slight coverage given their own or most other nations in our newspapers and television. Neglect of the Third World continues, though it contains most of the world's population and much of its resources, and the economic future of the world will depend on the feeding of one and use of the other.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 15, 2003
WASHINGTON -- The report that Secretary of State Colin L. Powell will step down after President Bush's first term -- dismissed by Mr. Powell as "gossip" -- nevertheless has much logic to it in light of the former general's defensive role in the administration's foreign policy. For all his spoken assurances that he is in lockstep with the president and major administration proponents of the essentially unilateral pre-emptive war against Iraq, Mr. Powell seemingly has been dragged kicking and screaming into the implementation of what is now known as the Bush Doctrine.
FEATURES
By Bruce McCabe and Bruce McCabe,Boston Globe | May 7, 1995
This week's biggest magazine news comes with a four-month lead time attached: Rupert Murdoch has agreed to back a national political weekly of conservative bent that will begin publication around Labor Day. The Standard, as the periodical is to be called, will have as its editor and publisher William Kristol, a leading Republican strategist and former chief of staff to Dan Quayle. Also aboard will be the New Republic's Fred Barnes, as executive editor, and New York Post television critic John Podhoretz, as deputy editor.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | January 28, 1994
WASHINGTON -- More than any other single aspect of President Clinton's State of the Union address, his threat to veto any health-care reform bill that "does not guarantee every American private health insurance that can never be taken away" has set inside Washington to speculating and interpreting.George Stephanopoulos, the president's senior (at age 32) adviser for policy and strategy, says the threat means just what it says -- that any bill that reaches Clinton's desk, to be signed, must include "a way to guarantee private insurance to every American, not just the right, but the means to exercise that right."
NEWS
By Andrew Bard Schmookler | April 22, 1997
BROADWAY, Va. -- Sometimes I'm alarmed by the judgments I hear people make. But sometimes what troubles me is not the conclusion they reach so much as the ease with which they come to their judgments, as if it were an open-and-shut case. That's how it was on a recent "This Week" program on ABC.As the gang discussed Vice President Gore's trip to China, the conservative pundit William Kristol complained about Mr. Gore's having conceded that, while China's blot is the massacre at Tiananmen Square, the United States, too, has committed great wrongs.
NEWS
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 8, 1995
In 1965, Lyndon Johnson's Great Society was alive and well, and politicians and intellectuals were united in the belief that the problems of racism and poverty could be solved by the creative spending of sufficient amounts of money. Thirty years later, a new generation of politicians and intellectuals is carting away the rubble of the Great Society, and the public's faith in the power of government to solve any problem whatsoever is at an all-time low.How did America get from there to here?
FEATURES
By Bruce McCabe and Bruce McCabe,Boston Globe | May 7, 1995
This week's biggest magazine news comes with a four-month lead time attached: Rupert Murdoch has agreed to back a national political weekly of conservative bent that will begin publication around Labor Day. The Standard, as the periodical is to be called, will have as its editor and publisher William Kristol, a leading Republican strategist and former chief of staff to Dan Quayle. Also aboard will be the New Republic's Fred Barnes, as executive editor, and New York Post television critic John Podhoretz, as deputy editor.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | January 7, 1995
Early last year, a leading conservative Republican theorist advised his party to declare war on President Clinton's health care reforms by arguing there was no crisis.And just prior to the Nov. 8 midterm elections, the same theorist urged the party to pull out the stops in openly obstructing the entire Clinton agenda, predicting that the strategy would bring big GOP gains.In both endeavors, the advice paid off. Clinton's hopes for sweeping health care reform were buried.And the Republican obstruction of other key aspects of the president's agenda, pursued on grounds that voters had had enough of intrusive government under an unpopular White House Democrat, helped produce the resounding GOP victory Nov. 8 that gave the party control of both houses of Congress for the first time in 40 years.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | October 4, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The best indication yet that the Republicans believe President Clinton's unpopularity is their ticket to fat congressional gains Nov. 8 may be a memorandum to Republican leaders from Bill Kristol, the former Dan Quayle chief of staff who now heads the new GOP think tank, Project for the Republican Future.All this year, Kristol has been the party's most conspicuous apostle of obstructionism, most notably obstruction of the Clinton health care plan and various offshoots, and of campaign finance reform.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | July 5, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Ross Perot's offer of a million dollars to the Republican Party for a television program attacking President Clinton's health care plan has given new focus to a debate going on within the party. Should it court Perot himself, or just his supporters?Based on what he did to GOP candidate George Bush in the 1992 election, many Republicans are arguing that it's better, or even imperative, that Perot be brought in under the party tent before 1996. Others, however, warn of his unpredictability and note that he apparently hit a stone wall in trying to buy nationwide television time himself to hit the Clinton plan.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | January 28, 1994
WASHINGTON -- More than any other single aspect of President Clinton's State of the Union address, his threat to veto any health-care reform bill that "does not guarantee every American private health insurance that can never be taken away" has set inside Washington to speculating and interpreting.George Stephanopoulos, the president's senior (at age 32) adviser for policy and strategy, says the threat means just what it says -- that any bill that reaches Clinton's desk, to be signed, must include "a way to guarantee private insurance to every American, not just the right, but the means to exercise that right."
NEWS
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 8, 1995
In 1965, Lyndon Johnson's Great Society was alive and well, and politicians and intellectuals were united in the belief that the problems of racism and poverty could be solved by the creative spending of sufficient amounts of money. Thirty years later, a new generation of politicians and intellectuals is carting away the rubble of the Great Society, and the public's faith in the power of government to solve any problem whatsoever is at an all-time low.How did America get from there to here?
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | July 5, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Ross Perot's offer of a million dollars to the Republican Party for a television program attacking President Clinton's health care plan has given new focus to a debate going on within the party. Should it court Perot himself, or just his supporters?Based on what he did to GOP candidate George Bush in the 1992 election, many Republicans are arguing that it's better, or even imperative, that Perot be brought in under the party tent before 1996. Others, however, warn of his unpredictability and note that he apparently hit a stone wall in trying to buy nationwide television time himself to hit the Clinton plan.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | December 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Whenever one of the national political parties falls on hard times, it's predictable that a new organization will spring up designed to put the losing party onto the correct path to resurrection.That was the case in 1985 when moderate and conservative Democrats, weary of the New Deal retread message conveyed to the electorate by 1984 presidential nominee Walter Mondale and convinced the party had to address the needs of middle-class voters more effectively, formed the Democratic Leadership Council.
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | August 2, 1991
Sen. Paul Simon and others have long argued that our citizensare insular, that few of us learn foreign languages, that the United States is educationally more self-centered than most other Western nations.Foreign journalists are surprised at the slight coverage given their own or most other nations in our newspapers and television. Neglect of the Third World continues, though it contains most of the world's population and much of its resources, and the economic future of the world will depend on the feeding of one and use of the other.
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