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October 12, 1990
Dr. Edward L. Krieg, who retired as a general surgeon and colonel in the Army Reserve, died of cancer Monday at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington. He was 75 and lived on Ramsey Drive in Ellicott City.A mass of Christian burial for Dr. Krieg was being offered today at the Roman Catholic Church of the Resurrection, Paulskirk Drive and Chatham Road, Ellicott City.He retired as a surgeon in 1987 but continued to serve as a consultant to the Social Security Administration until last March.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2011
Howard County's largest foundation is looking for a new leader after Horizon Foundation president and CEO Richard M. Krieg said he is planning to retire by the end of next year. Krieg, 63, a former Peace Corps volunteer and Chicago health commissioner, took over the Columbia-based, health-oriented philanthropy when it was founded in 1998. In a statement, he said "we've provided over $35 million for grants, strategic initiatives and foundation operations," while still growing the endowment from $70 million to $80 million.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2011
Howard County's largest foundation is looking for a new leader after Horizon Foundation president and CEO Richard M. Krieg said he is planning to retire by the end of next year. Krieg, 63, a former Peace Corps volunteer and Chicago health commissioner, took over the Columbia-based, health-oriented philanthropy when it was founded in 1998. In a statement, he said "we've provided over $35 million for grants, strategic initiatives and foundation operations," while still growing the endowment from $70 million to $80 million.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2010
A new centralized health information website intended to compare local statistics with national trends and inform users of the latest medical treatments is under preparation by a coalition of health groups led by the Horizon Foundation. The coalition working on Howard Health Counts is seeking feedback from medical professionals and agencies, but expect it to be available to the public in about two months, according to Dr. Richard Krieg, president and CEO of Horizon, the health foundation formed when Johns Hopkins Medicine took over Howard County General Hospital.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | March 7, 1992
C INDIANAPOLIS -- One lane over, the two swimmers were hugging and weeping, talking of going to the Summer Olympics in Barcelona, Spain.One lane over, a technician with a television minicam was circling from above on the pool deck, flashing his light on the water, trying to capture this perfect image of triumph.Julie Gorman of Lutherville could have reached out and touched the Olympians, now. Instead, she was floating against the wall, squinting at the scoreboard, searching for the numbers that would tell her how close she had come to second place in the women's 200-meter butterfly, how close she had come to Barcelona.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2010
A new centralized health information website intended to compare local statistics with national trends and inform users of the latest medical treatments is under preparation by a coalition of health groups led by the Horizon Foundation. The coalition working on Howard Health Counts is seeking feedback from medical professionals and agencies, but expect it to be available to the public in about two months, according to Dr. Richard Krieg, president and CEO of Horizon, the health foundation formed when Johns Hopkins Medicine took over Howard County General Hospital.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | January 18, 2008
Lying in a field and gazing up at the star-filled night sky of western Howard County is what finally sold Richard Krieg on taking the helm of the newly created Horizon Foundation a decade ago. Now the Ellicott City resident spends his workdays not only as the first president and chief executive officer of the Columbia-based health and wellness philanthropy, but also as moderator of a local cable TV program on health and community issues and chairman of...
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | September 9, 1999
A $61 million foundation devoted to improving health in Howard County has identified two groups -- the young and the old -- on which it plans to focus its efforts this year, foundation officials said yesterday.Richard M. Krieg, president and chief executive officer of the Horizon Foundation -- formerly the Howard County Community Health Foundation -- told the five-member County Council that its "proactive" grants will be awarded in the areas of adolescent substance abuse and the health of the elderly.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1999
Officials at Howard County's largest foundation announced yesterday a major initiative to improve the health of elderly county residents who live at home.Richard M. Krieg, president and chief executive officer of Horizon Foundation, said the board of directors has designated about $450,000 for a project called Aging in Place, which will focus on the health needs of county senior citizens, especially those with low income."The simple fact is that in this county, more older adults will choose to live at home and may face a myriad of problems," Krieg said.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2003
As large cities across the country prepare elaborate evacuation plans for the multitudes expected to flee in the event of a natural disaster or terrorist attack, Howard County authorities are preparing for a different scenario: "invacuation." Residents evacuating from Washington or Baltimore could pose a significant challenge to the county, say authorities, who concede that Howard is an unlikely terrorist target. "A lot of those routes pass right through Howard County, and we need to be prepared," said Richard M. Krieg, chairman of the Community Emergency Response Network, a group that is helping to organize the plan.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | January 18, 2008
Lying in a field and gazing up at the star-filled night sky of western Howard County is what finally sold Richard Krieg on taking the helm of the newly created Horizon Foundation a decade ago. Now the Ellicott City resident spends his workdays not only as the first president and chief executive officer of the Columbia-based health and wellness philanthropy, but also as moderator of a local cable TV program on health and community issues and chairman of...
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,sun reporter | February 7, 2007
Hiring former Baltimore Health Commissioner Dr. Peter Beilenson to be Howard County's health officer is part of a larger plan to upgrade county health services, County Executive Ken Ulman said yesterday. Ulman and Beilenson formally announced the change in leadership at a news conference yesterday in Ellicott City. Ulman said he had been thinking during last year's political campaigns of ways to raise the profile of health programs in the county. "Why can't Howard County be a model public health county?"
NEWS
December 26, 2004
Officer's suit alleges sexual harassment by county police A female Howard County police officer is charging in a federal lawsuit that a male "locker room"-dominated culture is tolerated by county police, replete with pornography displayed on work computers, sexual insults and harassment for women who complain. The civil rights discrimination suit, filed in October in U.S. District Court in Baltimore by Susan Ensko, a 15-year officer, names as defendants Howard County, Police Chief Wayne Livesay, Sgt. Paul Steppe and Officer Perry Sauers.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2003
As large cities across the country prepare elaborate evacuation plans for the multitudes expected to flee in the event of a natural disaster or terrorist attack, Howard County authorities are preparing for a different scenario: "invacuation." Residents evacuating from Washington or Baltimore could pose a significant challenge to the county, say authorities, who concede that Howard is an unlikely terrorist target. "A lot of those routes pass right through Howard County, and we need to be prepared," said Richard M. Krieg, chairman of the Community Emergency Response Network, a group that is helping to organize the plan.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2003
As large cities across the country prepare elaborate evacuation plans for the multitudes expected to flee in the event of a natural disaster or terrorist attack, Howard County authorities are preparing for a different scenario: "invacuation." Residents evacuating from Washington or Baltimore could pose a significant challenge to the county, say authorities, who concede that Howard is an unlikely terrorist target. "A lot of those routes pass right through Howard County, and we need to be prepared," said Richard M. Krieg, chairman of the Community Emergency Response Network, a group that is helping to organize the plan.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2003
Howard Community College took a hard look yesterday at what it would do if there were a terrorist attack nearby. The college's emergency response team, operations staff and volunteer building monitors gathered in a meeting room at the Columbia campus and walked through a fictional scenario involving a nuclear bomb exploding at Baltimore-Washington International Airport. The college is the second of several county organizations working through simulated disasters. The "table top" exercises are organized by the county's Community Emergency Response Network (CERN)
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2003
As large cities across the country prepare elaborate evacuation plans for the multitudes expected to flee in the event of a natural disaster or terrorist attack, Howard County authorities are preparing for a different scenario: "invacuation." Residents evacuating from Washington or Baltimore could pose a significant challenge to the county, say authorities, who concede that Howard is an unlikely terrorist target. "A lot of those routes pass right through Howard County, and we need to be prepared," said Richard M. Krieg, chairman of the Community Emergency Response Network, a group that is helping to organize the plan.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1999
When Richard M. Krieg, president and chief executive officer of Howard County's largest foundation, asks you what's on your mind, he isn't just making small talk.Krieg and his 16-member board are the caretakers of the new $61 million Horizon Foundation, which aims to improve the health of county residents. They are talking to as many people as possible to determine their issues -- and they are concerned about more than cancer, heart disease and the like. They are interested in the way people live, what they do for recreation, where they meet with friends, if they have enough time to spend with spouses, and what their children like to do on Saturday night.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1999
Officials at Howard County's largest foundation announced yesterday a major initiative to improve the health of elderly county residents who live at home.Richard M. Krieg, president and chief executive officer of Horizon Foundation, said the board of directors has designated about $450,000 for a project called Aging in Place, which will focus on the health needs of county senior citizens, especially those with low income."The simple fact is that in this county, more older adults will choose to live at home and may face a myriad of problems," Krieg said.
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