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By New York Times | January 16, 1991
MOSCOW -- There were growing signs that the Kremlin was preparing to follow up the military crackdown in Lithuania with similar actions in the other Baltic states of Latvia and Estonia.In the Lithuanian capital of Vilnius the National Salvation Committee, the new pro-Moscow body being used as an apparent front for inviting the Soviet military to intervene, called yesterday for direct rule by President Mikhail Gorbachev.Similar calls were heard as well in Latvia and Estonia at pro-Moscow rallies organized by Communist Party leaders loyal to Moscow.
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NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | July 30, 2013
Russian President Vladimir Putin cares a lot about what you think -- about NSA contractor-turned-defector and Russian asylum seeker Edward Snowden, and pretty much everything else -- to the point of spending $300 million of state funds last year on the external audiovisual service RT, designed primarily to spoonfeed the Kremlin worldview to a global audience. And unearthed records show that's just the tip of a much more insidious iceberg. Why, you might ask, would an iron-fisted authoritarian care about what the masses outside of his own country think?
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NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 15, 2007
MOSCOW -- Amid the worst chill in U.S.-Russian relations since the Soviet era, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice arrived in Moscow yesterday for talks aimed at convincing the Kremlin that a U.S.-planned missile shield in Eastern Europe poses no threat to Russia. Wariness of Washington's bid for an anti-ballistic missile defense system based in the Czech Republic and Poland has spread throughout Europe, but opposition to the plan is fiercest in Russia, where leaders remain convinced that the shield could one day provide the infrastructure for offensive weapons.
NEWS
By Megan K. Stack and Megan K. Stack,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 12, 2007
MOSCOW -- The soft-spoken bureaucrat just presented to the world as Russian President Vladimir V. Putin's hand-picked successor appeared on state television yesterday with a deferential plea: The country must remain under Putin's leadership. Dmitry Medvedev, the Kremlin-backed candidate expected to ascend to the presidency in March elections, called on Putin to head the next government as prime minister. Only Putin, he said, will be able to ensure national stability. "It is not enough to elect a new president who shares [Putin's]
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 30, 2004
NOW HERE'S a thought that should make Baltimore high school juniors who just passed the school year quake in their boots: System honchos have come down with a case of "we-love-students-itis." The story hit the news last week: The masterminds down at the Kremlin -- school headquarters on North Avenue -- in their zeal to "help" 12th-graders, allowed some seniors to retake final exams and gave them a chance to graduate. Purely altruistic motives, you understand. No attempt to pad graduation numbers and push kids out the door to comply with the federal No Child Left Behind Act. No hanky-panky of any sort.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 6, 2004
GROZNY, Russia - Alu Alkhanov, the Kremlin's latest hope for stabilizing its foundering strategy in the Caucasus, was sworn into office here yesterday as president of Chechnya, taking control of the government of a republic with its infrastructure in ruins and its nights racked by lawlessness and terror. The ceremony took place on the first day of what is supposed to be a four-year term. Of all the difficult tasks ahead - and there are many - Alkhanov's chief chore may be to stay alive.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 10, 2006
MOSCOW -- Two pro-Kremlin officials were shot to death minutes apart yesterday in Ingushetia, a republic bordering Chechnya in Russia's volatile North Caucasus that has been destabilized by the region's separatist and Islamic insurgency. The assassinations appeared to be another round of carefully timed attacks against the government. First, an administrator responsible for helping Russian families resettle in the region was gunned down, and then a senior police commander was killed as he drove his three young children to school.
NEWS
March 24, 1998
DURING his long career, first as a red satrap and then as post-communist Russia's first president, Boris N. Yeltsin has been full of surprises. Nevertheless, his stunning decision to unceremoniously fire Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin and his Cabinet raises serious questions about the 67-year-old Kremlin leader's soundness.Except for the first year of erratic reforms, Mr. Chernomyrdin, who became prime minister in December 1992, has been at the helm of government during Russia's free-market experiment.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 28, 2005
MOSCOW --The most outspoken of President Vladimir V. Putin's senior advisers abruptly resigned yesterday, warning that Russia's nascent political freedoms have been lost and the Kremlin's economic choices have been poor. He also said he had no more ability to influence the government's course. The official, Andrei N. Illarionov, 44, had been an economic adviser to the Kremlin since shortly after Putin took office nearly six years ago. His tenure in recent years had turned publicly rocky, and he had become an occasional but memorable critic of Kremlin policy.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 10, 1999
MOSCOW -- Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin was taken to the Central Clinical Hospital yesterday morning suffering from what his press secretary described as the flu accompanied by a high fever.Dmitri Yakushkin, the Kremlin press secretary, said Yeltsin, 68, had not felt well Friday but refused to go into the hospital until yesterday. Yakushkin said the president would stay in the hospital for at least two days.Yeltsin, now less than a year away from finishing his second four-year term in office, has been in poor health for years.
NEWS
By Megan K. Stack and Megan K. Stack,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 11, 2007
MOSCOW -- President Vladimir V. Putin yesterday backed First Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev as a candidate to succeed him, abruptly snatching away the shroud of secrecy that has obscured the hunt for a new Russian leader. The country has been waiting anxiously for Putin, who finishes his second term in office next year, to anoint a successor. Conventional wisdom in Moscow has long taken it for granted that whomever Putin tapped would be elected president. Still, Putin's surprise endorsement startled many analysts.
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,Chicago Tribune | August 18, 2007
MOSCOW -- Russian President Vladimir V. Putin said yesterday that he has ordered the resumption of long-range strategic bomber flights, a return to a Cold War-era practice and another sign that the Kremlin is flexing its military might amid a deepening chill in relations with the U.S. Putin's decision comes a week after Russian fighter jets flew within a few hundred miles of a U.S. military base in Guam. Yesterday, several pairs of Russian Tu-160 and Tu-95MC bombers were flying over Atlantic and Pacific waters, Russian Air Force spokesman Alexander Drobyshevsky told the Russian news agency Itar-Tass.
NEWS
June 3, 2007
The Bad Cop chose Baltimore. His name is David Kramer, he's a deputy assistant secretary of state, and he came here to slap Russia around a little bit. This is a country, he told the Baltimore Council for Foreign Affairs last week, that engages in "outright bullying" of its neighbors and "saber-rattling" against NATO. "Inside Russia, there has also been a worrisome slide in an anti-democratic direction," he said - against legitimate opposition, against the expansion of a civil society, and against the press.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | June 1, 2007
MOSCOW -- The Russian businessman accused by British prosecutors of fatally poisoning former Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko in London turned the tables yesterday and blamed the death on British secret services -- and a fierce opponent of the Kremlin who lives in self-imposed exile in Britain. Andrei Lugovoi, a former bodyguard with the KGB, also alleged that Litvinenko had been recruited as a spy for Britain's Secret Intelligence Service and that Litvinenko had tried in turn to recruit him to gather "compromising material" on Russian President Vladimir V. Putin.
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 15, 2007
MOSCOW -- Amid the worst chill in U.S.-Russian relations since the Soviet era, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice arrived in Moscow yesterday for talks aimed at convincing the Kremlin that a U.S.-planned missile shield in Eastern Europe poses no threat to Russia. Wariness of Washington's bid for an anti-ballistic missile defense system based in the Czech Republic and Poland has spread throughout Europe, but opposition to the plan is fiercest in Russia, where leaders remain convinced that the shield could one day provide the infrastructure for offensive weapons.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,Los Angeles Times | March 17, 2007
MOSCOW -- Russian federal police in war-battered Chechnya regularly engage in torture of detainees, the republic's Kremlin-backed president declared yesterday, as he announced a criminal investigation into the alleged abuse. President Ramzan Kadyrov, whose own Chechen forces have faced frequent allegations of human rights abuses, including kidnappings, torture and murder, singled out a detention facility known as ORB-2 run by the Russian Interior Ministry in the town of Urus-Martan. "The situation at the Operative and Investigative Bureau No. 2, where detainees are systematically subjected to torture, is totally unacceptable," Kadyrov told journalists in the Chechen capital, Grozny, according to the Russian news agency Interfax.
NEWS
August 26, 1996
SO MANY PEOPLE -- particularly in Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's inner circle -- want retired Gen. Alexander Lebed to fail that the security chief's early success in bringing hostilities to an end in Chechnya is nothing short of stunning. Mr. Lebed's mission may ultimately fail because his rivals do not want him to acquire more power and prestige. But he has shown that negotiations with the separatists are possible and that the Chechens may be ready to abandon their demand for independence.
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 4, 2003
MOSCOW - Russia took pains yesterday to back away from a top Kremlin aide's remarks that the country would not ratify a landmark accord aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions, stressing that Moscow has yet to make a decision about the international pact. On Tuesday, Andrei Illarionov, Russian President Vladimir V. Putin's economic issues adviser, appeared to deal a fatal blow to the controversial 1997 Kyoto Protocol, saying Moscow could not ratify the pact in its current form. The agreement needs Russia's approval to be put into force.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,Los Angeles Times | March 3, 2007
MOSCOW -- A Kremlin-backed strongman who has spearheaded efforts to pacify war-battered Chechnya through a mix of repression and economic reconstruction won legislative approval yesterday as president of the region in southern Russia. Ramzan Kadyrov, the son of a former Chechen president who was assassinated in 2004, is a former prime minister. He has been the most powerful figure in the region since his father's death but didn't turn 30, the minimum age for the presidency, until October.
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,Chicago Tribune | January 14, 2007
MOSCOW -- Russian authorities have never been known for their eco-friendliness, but late last year inspectors swooped down on the vast Kovykta natural gas field in east Siberia and came away with a long list of alleged misdeeds, including excavation violations and illegal logging. Few in Russia, however, believe that the government has suddenly gone green. Kovykta is Russia's largest natural gas field, storing enough natural gas to keep the world's largest energy consumer, the U.S., supplied for two years.
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