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By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | February 10, 2009
Shirley L. Kranz, former officer manager of The Sun's Washington bureau and a Democratic political activist, died Friday of a severe infection at Holy Cross Hospital in Silver Spring. She was 84. Shirley Lipnick was born and raised in New Brunswick, N.J. After graduating from New Brunswick High School, she enrolled at what is now Rider University in Trenton. After World War II broke out, she dropped out of college her senior year and went to work as a payroll specialist at the Army's Special Forces Depot in Belle Meade, N.J. In 1943, she married Harry Kranz, who was then a student at Rutgers University.
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NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | February 10, 2009
Shirley L. Kranz, former officer manager of The Sun's Washington bureau and a Democratic political activist, died Friday of a severe infection at Holy Cross Hospital in Silver Spring. She was 84. Shirley Lipnick was born and raised in New Brunswick, N.J. After graduating from New Brunswick High School, she enrolled at what is now Rider University in Trenton. After World War II broke out, she dropped out of college her senior year and went to work as a payroll specialist at the Army's Special Forces Depot in Belle Meade, N.J. In 1943, she married Harry Kranz, who was then a student at Rutgers University.
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NEWS
May 27, 2003
On May 25, 2003 MARIE BURTON (Kranz) beloved wife of the late James E. Burton Sr. and Melvin Kranz, loving mother of William E., James E. Jr., and the late Robert J. Burton, grandmother of Joseph J. and William A. Burton, Anna Marie Novak, Judy E. Tolzman and the late Robert W. Burton, great-grandmother of James G. Weyforth, Jessica A. and Lisa M. Ferretto. Family and friends may call at the Johnson Funeral Home P.A., 8521 Loch Raven Blvd (Beltway Exit 29B) on Tuesday from 2 to 4 P.M.
NEWS
By Albert M. Hill and Albert M. Hill,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2004
Every year, dozens of youngsters and their parents hunt for fossils at Peter Kranz's Dinosaur Camp in Fort Washington. If they're lucky, they wind up with a few clamshells and sharks' teeth. But last month, a Virginia mother and her 8-year-old twins uncovered what every camper dreams of finding: the skeleton of an unknown reptile that roamed the Coastal Plain 60 million years ago. Terri Fudala, 37, of Chantilly said she was walking through the well-known fossil site along a creek in Prince George's County with her twins, when something caught their eye. "We saw a rock with an interesting thing on it," said Fudala, "So we peeked at it closer and decided it was very interesting."
NEWS
By Albert M. Hill and Albert M. Hill,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2004
Every year, dozens of youngsters and their parents hunt for fossils at Peter Kranz's Dinosaur Camp in Fort Washington. If they're lucky, they wind up with a few clamshells and sharks' teeth. But last month, a Virginia mother and her 8-year-old twins uncovered what every camper dreams of finding: the skeleton of an unknown reptile that roamed the Coastal Plain 60 million years ago. Terri Fudala, 37, of Chantilly said she was walking through the well-known fossil site along a creek in Prince George's County with her twins, when something caught their eye. "We saw a rock with an interesting thing on it," said Fudala, "So we peeked at it closer and decided it was very interesting."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1998
EMMITSBURG -- A Washington geologist picking through a rock pile has discovered what appears to be the first dinosaur footprint reported in Maryland in more than a century.Peter Kranz, a free-lance writer, educator and popularizer of Maryland's dinosaur heritage, spotted the single print this month on a 50-pound slab of red sandstone dug up by housing construction in Emmitsburg in Frederick County.Just 4 inches wide, the three-toed, duck-like print is barely discernible on the surface of the 210 million-year-old rock.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 5, 1998
An amateur geologist poking around on a desolate, rubble-strewn lot in Arbutus has stumbled across what appears to be part of a leg bone of Maryland's official state dinosaur, Astrodon johnstoni.Rick Smith, 44, found the bone last Sunday after just four trips to the property. He could hardly believe his beginner's luck."The idea of finding a dinosaur bone less than two miles from my house is pretty mind-boggling," he said.The find was identified on Tuesday by Washington geologist Peter Kranz.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 24, 2000
WASHINGTON - Mention dinosaurs, and most people will think of fossil beds in South Dakota or the Gobi Desert. But Laurel, Md.? Yes, Maryland had dinosaurs, too, and more than 100 fossil relics - most found in the Baltimore-Washington corridor - were shipped to Chicago this week for exhibition at next month's Dinofest. The 2000 Dinofest, at Chicago's Navy Pier, is being billed as "The World's Fair of Dinosaurs" and the largest display of dinosaur fossils and robots ever. More than 500,000 people visited the 1998 Dinofest, which was held in Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 9, 1996
John R. Kranz, 56, real estate developerJohn Robert Kranz, a real estate developer who helped design shopping centers nationwide, died Tuesday of a brain tumor at his Guilford home. He was 56.He was senior vice president for design for Mills Corp., a Roslyn, Va., real estate development firm.From 1983 to 1986, he oversaw architecture and development for Franklin Property Co. and worked in construction management for Rouse Co. from 1979 to 1983.The New York City native graduated from Wesleyan University in Middletown, Conn.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2000
Dr. Andrei Kranz disconnected the carbon monoxide detector in his Long Island, N.Y., home last summer because the device kept going off for no apparent reason and waking the family. In May, Kranz came home to find his parents, his 3-year-old daughter, the nanny and two houseguests dead in their beds, all victims of carbon monoxide poisoning. Police investigators found that someone had turned on the air conditioner without shutting off the furnace. The air conditioner's intake filter was clogged with leaves, so the cooling system drew in furnace fumes instead.
NEWS
May 27, 2003
On May 25, 2003 MARIE BURTON (Kranz) beloved wife of the late James E. Burton Sr. and Melvin Kranz, loving mother of William E., James E. Jr., and the late Robert J. Burton, grandmother of Joseph J. and William A. Burton, Anna Marie Novak, Judy E. Tolzman and the late Robert W. Burton, great-grandmother of James G. Weyforth, Jessica A. and Lisa M. Ferretto. Family and friends may call at the Johnson Funeral Home P.A., 8521 Loch Raven Blvd (Beltway Exit 29B) on Tuesday from 2 to 4 P.M.
NEWS
By Allison Steele and Allison Steele,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2001
More than 400 Scouts have been getting wet and dirty at the Howard County Fairgrounds this week, seeking to uncover the remains of dinosaurs that might have lived millions of years ago near where their houses are now. Digging into a mound of rocky dirt about the size of a Volkswagen Beetle taken from a site in Laurel called Blue Lake, the Scouts are learning, under the direction of paleontologist Peter Kranz, the secrets of finding bits of history....
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 24, 2000
WASHINGTON - Mention dinosaurs, and most people will think of fossil beds in South Dakota or the Gobi Desert. But Laurel, Md.? Yes, Maryland had dinosaurs, too, and more than 100 fossil relics - most found in the Baltimore-Washington corridor - were shipped to Chicago this week for exhibition at next month's Dinofest. The 2000 Dinofest, at Chicago's Navy Pier, is being billed as "The World's Fair of Dinosaurs" and the largest display of dinosaur fossils and robots ever. More than 500,000 people visited the 1998 Dinofest, which was held in Philadelphia.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2000
Dr. Andrei Kranz disconnected the carbon monoxide detector in his Long Island, N.Y., home last summer because the device kept going off for no apparent reason and waking the family. In May, Kranz came home to find his parents, his 3-year-old daughter, the nanny and two houseguests dead in their beds, all victims of carbon monoxide poisoning. Police investigators found that someone had turned on the air conditioner without shutting off the furnace. The air conditioner's intake filter was clogged with leaves, so the cooling system drew in furnace fumes instead.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 27, 2000
"Bed and Sofa" is a small musical with big themes. Based on a 1926 silent Russian film by Abram Room, the three-person show about a romantic triangle also examines the similarities between the tyranny of love and the tyranny of dictatorship. The Soviet government banned the movie, but seven decades later, composer Polly Pen and librettist Laurence Klavan turned it into what they call "a silent movie opera." That hybrid, which is far from silent, is receiving a vocally arresting debut at Fell's Point Corner Theatre.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1999
After being encased in rock for more than 115 million years, and stashed in boxes for another 140, Maryland's dinosaurs are finally getting their day in the spotlight.On Saturday, the Maryland Science Center will open what is believed to be the first exhibit anywhere on the giant reptiles that once made the Land of Pleasant Living their home.Amazingly, amid all the shopping malls and tract housing and industrial parks, the "terrible lizards" are still with us, often almost literally in our back yards.
NEWS
By Luther Young | December 10, 1990
Peter Kranz doesn't even slow down as he threads the concrete jungle of industrial parks, shopping strips and housing developments between Baltimore and Washington, seeking unpaved islands that hold secrets to Maryland's prehistoric past."
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1995
The difference between the Goodwill Book Nook on Charles Street and other thrift stores was simple: At the Nook, you could actually find a title you were looking for."The thing I like about this place is it's a real bookstore with decent books, not just a jumble," said Fred Jacobowitz, a regular.After Dec. 16, patrons of the basement shop at 525 N. Charles St. won't be able to find anything. Goodwill Industries of Baltimore is shutting it down, along with another store on South Conkling Street in Highlandtown.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 5, 1998
An amateur geologist poking around on a desolate, rubble-strewn lot in Arbutus has stumbled across what appears to be part of a leg bone of Maryland's official state dinosaur, Astrodon johnstoni.Rick Smith, 44, found the bone last Sunday after just four trips to the property. He could hardly believe his beginner's luck."The idea of finding a dinosaur bone less than two miles from my house is pretty mind-boggling," he said.The find was identified on Tuesday by Washington geologist Peter Kranz.
FEATURES
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 29, 1998
EMMITSBURG - Peter Kranz, Maryland's dinosaur evangelist, teeters precariously on the weed-choked slope of an old mudstone quarry near the Pennsylvania line.His feet slipping on the tilted bedrock and fallen leaves, the Washington-based geologist is trying to explain to quarry owner and town councilman Patrick Boyle how Emmitsburg could turn the rocks in this forlorn place into a wellspring of tourist dollars."If you peel this back," he says, waving toward the brush and dirt clinging to the quarry's layered rock slabs, "there's absolutely going to be footprints on them."
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