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By Fawn Vrazo and Fawn Vrazo,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 14, 1995
GRUBORI, Croatia -- Farm animals wander through this once-vibrant hamlet. Goats badly in need of milking stand on porches. Starving pigs root through trash. Donkeys bray in the gardens, while distressed sheep huddle against stone walls. The air is filled with constant wailing from hungry cats.When winter comes, the animals probably will die.Like the people.Grubori's human residents are all dead or departed. Six were killed late last month in a massacre that is being shrugged off in Croatia as one of war's mishaps.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2013
After opening the season with five consecutive losses, the Mount St. Mary's men's basketball team has won three of its past five games, including Saturday's 70-58 victory over Loyola. The surprising part is that the positive results have occurred without two starters. Senior center Kristijan Krajina has missed the last three games and will sit out the remainder of the season because of a torn anterior cruciate ligament. Freshman shooting guard Byron Ashe has not played in the past two games after suffering a concussion during practice.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 21, 1993
UNITED NATIONS -- In a last-ditch effort to bring peace to the former Yugoslavia before the brutal Balkan winter sets in, European foreign ministers will propose a new, wide-ranging settlement that covers Croatia as well as Bosnia-Herzegovina, European officials said yesterday.The plan, to be presented to the warring parties when they meet in Luxembourg tomorrow, would require the Serbs to offer the Bosnian Muslims a little more land in addition to what the Serbs agreed to give up in exchange for peace last summer.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | December 30, 2012
Kristijan Krajina scored 14 points and grabbed eight rebounds to pace the host Mount St. Mary's men's basketball team to a 58-55 win over UMBC on Saturday. The Mountaineers improved to 3-0 at home this season with the victory. The Mount used a 7-0 run early in the second half to take its biggest lead of the game, 39-31, with 14:30 remaining. Raven Barber capped the run with five consecutive points. The Retrievers (2-11) answered with a 13-4 spurt to take its only lead of the second half, 44-43, on a Joey Getz layup.  Mount St. Mary's (5-6)
NEWS
December 18, 1993
Croatia and rebel Serbs holding a third of the country agreed on a cease-fire covering the Christmas and New Year holiday period. The truce in the breakaway Krajina region of Croatia would roughly parallel to a cease-fire approved Thursday by Muslim and Croat forces in neighboring Bosnia.The Krajina news agency reported Serb voters just failed to elect hardline nationalist Milan Babic as their president in a first round ballot last Sunday. To become president, Babic needed to win 50 percent of the vote.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 7, 1995
KUZMIN, Yugoslavia -- After viewing themselves as victors against Muslims and Croats for the past four years, tens of thousands of Serbs found themselves refugees yesterday, a humiliating role reversal for a people proud of their skills as warriors.Riding tractors, hunched in trailers and astride horses, they poured from Croatia into Bosnia in one of the biggest exoduses of refugees in the fighting since Yugoslavia broke up in 1991. Many were moving on into Yugoslavia, and some were already showing up in Belgrade, the capital.
NEWS
August 8, 1995
The Croatian invasion of Krajina is another step in the inexorable ethnic partition of the former Yugoslavia.This military action has been in the works since Croatian Serbs seized control of the area in 1991. Before counter-attacking, though, Croatia needed to acquire armaments and train men. Thanks to long borders with Austria and Hungary, the U.N. arms embargo was never a problem. When Croatia had an army ready to go, it set about reconquering the areas it lost four years earlier. Its greatest successes were where the Croatian Serbian supply lines to Serbia were longest and most tenuous.
NEWS
By DAN FESPERMAN | February 12, 1995
Berlin -- If you've ever wondered why the war in Bosnia seems as if it will never end, here's a short but illuminating quiz:Question One. When did international mediators first warn the Bosnian Serbs that "time is running out" for peace negotiations?Two years and a month ago. The latest such warning came from the French during the past two weeks. For some reason the Serbs didn't take it seriously.Question Two. When did the news media report that a fierce Serbian attack was "tightening a noose around" the Muslim enclave of Bihac?
NEWS
By DANIEL BERGER | August 19, 1995
Austria despaired of the Croatian nobility's ability to stop the Turks. So, in 1522, the Emperor Ferdinand established the Military Frontier (in Serbo-Croat: Vojna Krajina).He populated it with soldier-settlers called Grenzer (frontiersmen). In exchange for perpetual military service, these refugees from Turkish conquest were given land, the right to choose their captains and freedom to practice their Orthodox faith.In revolution-wracked 1848, the Croatian nobles named aGrenzer general, Josip Jelacic, their ban (governor)
NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | August 4, 1995
ZAGREB, Croatia -- As Croatia teetered on the brink of war, U.S. Ambassador Peter Galbraith said last night that his secret meeting with rebel Krajina Serbs had produced enough concrete concessions to keep the peace.Mr. Galbraith spoke to reporters after presenting the peace plan to Croatian President Franjo Tudjman. There was no immediate response from Mr. Tudjman, who was meeting with his national security advisers. And 100,000 Croatian soldiers remained poised to attack the Krajina region.
NEWS
By Fawn Vrazo and Fawn Vrazo,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 14, 1995
GRUBORI, Croatia -- Farm animals wander through this once-vibrant hamlet. Goats badly in need of milking stand on porches. Starving pigs root through trash. Donkeys bray in the gardens, while distressed sheep huddle against stone walls. The air is filled with constant wailing from hungry cats.When winter comes, the animals probably will die.Like the people.Grubori's human residents are all dead or departed. Six were killed late last month in a massacre that is being shrugged off in Croatia as one of war's mishaps.
NEWS
By DANIEL BERGER | August 19, 1995
Austria despaired of the Croatian nobility's ability to stop the Turks. So, in 1522, the Emperor Ferdinand established the Military Frontier (in Serbo-Croat: Vojna Krajina).He populated it with soldier-settlers called Grenzer (frontiersmen). In exchange for perpetual military service, these refugees from Turkish conquest were given land, the right to choose their captains and freedom to practice their Orthodox faith.In revolution-wracked 1848, the Croatian nobles named aGrenzer general, Josip Jelacic, their ban (governor)
NEWS
August 8, 1995
The Croatian invasion of Krajina is another step in the inexorable ethnic partition of the former Yugoslavia.This military action has been in the works since Croatian Serbs seized control of the area in 1991. Before counter-attacking, though, Croatia needed to acquire armaments and train men. Thanks to long borders with Austria and Hungary, the U.N. arms embargo was never a problem. When Croatia had an army ready to go, it set about reconquering the areas it lost four years earlier. Its greatest successes were where the Croatian Serbian supply lines to Serbia were longest and most tenuous.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 7, 1995
KUZMIN, Yugoslavia -- After viewing themselves as victors against Muslims and Croats for the past four years, tens of thousands of Serbs found themselves refugees yesterday, a humiliating role reversal for a people proud of their skills as warriors.Riding tractors, hunched in trailers and astride horses, they poured from Croatia into Bosnia in one of the biggest exoduses of refugees in the fighting since Yugoslavia broke up in 1991. Many were moving on into Yugoslavia, and some were already showing up in Belgrade, the capital.
NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | August 4, 1995
ZAGREB, Croatia -- As Croatia teetered on the brink of war, U.S. Ambassador Peter Galbraith said last night that his secret meeting with rebel Krajina Serbs had produced enough concrete concessions to keep the peace.Mr. Galbraith spoke to reporters after presenting the peace plan to Croatian President Franjo Tudjman. There was no immediate response from Mr. Tudjman, who was meeting with his national security advisers. And 100,000 Croatian soldiers remained poised to attack the Krajina region.
NEWS
By DAN FESPERMAN | February 12, 1995
Berlin -- If you've ever wondered why the war in Bosnia seems as if it will never end, here's a short but illuminating quiz:Question One. When did international mediators first warn the Bosnian Serbs that "time is running out" for peace negotiations?Two years and a month ago. The latest such warning came from the French during the past two weeks. For some reason the Serbs didn't take it seriously.Question Two. When did the news media report that a fierce Serbian attack was "tightening a noose around" the Muslim enclave of Bihac?
NEWS
April 5, 1994
The Croatian army and rebel Krajina Serb forces began pulling back heavy weapons near ZADAR after a cease-fire agreement aimed at formally ending their 1991 war took effect in the morning.The Red Cross has suspended plans for immediate evacuation of thousands of Muslims and Croats from PRIJEDOR, scene of recent ethnic violence, after Bosian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic placed drastic limits on the number of people he would allow to go.
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