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By Don Markus and Don Markus,Staff Writer | June 27, 1992
WIMBLEDON, England -- The latest Wimbledon controversy started with 11th seed Richard Krajicek of the Netherlands talking to a Dutch radio reporter after his five-set loss to Arnaud Boetsch of France. It ended with the revival of a controversy that has embroiled professional tennis for several years.Krajicek told the Dutch reporter that "80 percent of the top 100 women's players are fat pigs and don't belong on the show courts," after his 6-4, 6-7 (6-8), 6-3, 6-7 (5-7), 2-6 loss to Boetsch.
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 29, 2002
WIMBLEDON, England - There was a time when American men dominated Wimbledon, turning the Fourth of July into a star-spangled serve-and-volley fest. But not anymore. Yesterday, the decline and fall of American men's tennis was on display as Andy Roddick and Taylor Dent were sent packing in the third round. Roddick, the No. 11 seed, was thrashed by No. 23 Greg Rusedski of Britain, 6-3, 6-4, 6-2. Unseeded Dent was beaten in a big-serving clash by Australia's Wayne Arthurs, 7-6 (2), 7-6 (3)
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Staff Writer | September 6, 1993
NEW YORK -- Neither is known for playing long points or long matches. Though Richard Krajicek and Todd Martin did not completely reverse form in their third-round match yesterday, they nearly rewrote history at the U.S. Open.When the smoke cleared on the Grandstand Court at the National Tennis Center, after five hours and 10 minutes of booming serves and blistering ground strokes, the 10th-seeded Krajicek had come back the brink of elimination to defeat Martin, 6-7 (7-4), 4-6, 7-6 (11-9) 6-4, 6-4.It was believed to be the second-longest match in Open history, 12 minutes shy of last year's semifinal between Stefan Edberg and Michael Chang.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 25, 2002
WIMBLEDON, England - They're in their 30s, the tennis twilight, the last three ex-men's champions left standing at Wimbledon. But yesterday, Pete Sampras, Andre Agassi and Richard Krajicek managed to remind the tennis world that they're not old, just older, winning their opening-round matches on an opening day unlike any other in recent memory at Wimbledon. Usually the reigning men's champion plays the first match on Centre Court, pulling up the first divots on the emerald lawn. But for the first time since opening day 1946 - when the tournament resumed after stopping during World War II - the men's finalists from the previous year were missing.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 22, 1997
WIMBLEDON, England -- This is Richard Krajicek's idea of a good time at Wimbledon:One serve and a cloud of dust.Let others whine about playing -- and watching -- men's tennis on grass. The way Krajicek sees it, Wimbledon is about serving aces, bashing returns and snuffing out rallies in a hurry.That's how he won Wimbledon last year. And that's how he plans to win again this year, when the tournament opens its two-week run tomorrow at the All England Club."I understand that if the point goes quick, people think it's boring," he said.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 28, 1991
NEW YORK -- It was his first time in Louis Armstrong Stadium, and the kid was acting like he owned the place.For 3 hours and 3 minutes, he was shoving Ivan Lendl around the court, blowing in 120 mph serves that had Lendl backing off the baseline and swinging from the Long Island Railroad. The kid was slicing backhands and rumbling in for volleys, and here he was now at double match point in the fourth set of the first round of the U.S. Open.The crowd stirred, making that rustling noise of surprise and delight that is the soundtrack at every upset.
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1996
WIMBLEDON, England -- Richard Krajicek reached up to the sky with a classic fluid motion and came over the top for booming serve after booming serve yesterday to become the first Dutchman to win the Wimbledon men's championship.However, the winning point, in his masterful 6-3, 6-4, 6-3 bruising of American MaliVai Washington came off a stunningly low backhand that Washington could not handle.When the ball did not come back, Krajicek went to his knees clutching his racket so hard his entire body shook.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 4, 1998
WIMBLEDON, England -- It was an epic in search of an ending.On and on they went in the fifth set, with no tiebreaker and no excuses, trading serves and groans as the fans gasped and the tennis balls caromed around Centre Court like spent shells. The games ticked off 12 24 28.Finally, Richard Krajicek cracked. And Goran Ivanisevic, Wimbledon's great-escape artist, won."The fifth set was just a horror-thriller," Ivanisevic said after yesterday's heart-pounding 6-3, 6-4, 5-7, 6-7 (5-7), 15-13 triumph launched him into Wimbledon's men's final.
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1997
NEW YORK -- No. 20 Greg Rusedski was the first men's quarterfinalist to move into the U.S. Open semifinals yesterday. But few seemed to care.Many fans in Arthur Ashe Stadium left after watching a wonderful 2 1/2 -hour confrontation between No. 3 seed Jana Novotna and No. 6 Lindsay Davenport. Finally, Davenport won a third-set tiebreaker to upset her doubles partner, 6-2, 4-6, 7-6 (7-5).Davenport will now play No. 1 Martina Hingis, a 6-3, 6-2 winner over No. 10 Arantxa Sanchez Vicario for the right to meet the winner of the other semifinal between fellow American Venus Williams and Romanian Irina Spirlea in Sunday's final.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 25, 2002
WIMBLEDON, England - They're in their 30s, the tennis twilight, the last three ex-men's champions left standing at Wimbledon. But yesterday, Pete Sampras, Andre Agassi and Richard Krajicek managed to remind the tennis world that they're not old, just older, winning their opening-round matches on an opening day unlike any other in recent memory at Wimbledon. Usually the reigning men's champion plays the first match on Centre Court, pulling up the first divots on the emerald lawn. But for the first time since opening day 1946 - when the tournament resumed after stopping during World War II - the men's finalists from the previous year were missing.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2000
NEW YORK - Third seed Magnus Norman turned into the wind in Arthur Ashe Stadium yesterday afternoon at the U.S. Open and seemed to see all hope blow away. He had tried to be aggressive, tried to be conservative. He had even changed his dull, white shirt for a fire-engine red one in hopes of turning red hot. But nothing made any difference. Across the net, No. 14 Nicolas Kiefer, who has been forced to leave his rooms and change hotels several nights because of the United Nations Millenium Summit, had all the answers as he dispatched the Swede, 6-2, 6-7 (3-7)
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 4, 1998
WIMBLEDON, England -- It was an epic in search of an ending.On and on they went in the fifth set, with no tiebreaker and no excuses, trading serves and groans as the fans gasped and the tennis balls caromed around Centre Court like spent shells. The games ticked off 12 24 28.Finally, Richard Krajicek cracked. And Goran Ivanisevic, Wimbledon's great-escape artist, won."The fifth set was just a horror-thriller," Ivanisevic said after yesterday's heart-pounding 6-3, 6-4, 5-7, 6-7 (5-7), 15-13 triumph launched him into Wimbledon's men's final.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 3, 1998
WIMBLEDON, England -- So, here's the forecast for today's men's semifinals at Wimbledon: tennis thunder followed by British lightning.No. 14-seed Goran Ivanisevic and No. 9 Richard Krajicek, two big-serving bashers who never pass up the chance to score an ace, will meet in one semifinal.And the other match will pit local favorite Tim Henman, the No. 12 seed and great British hope, in an against-all-odds confrontation with No. 1 seed and four-time Wimbledon champion Pete Sampras.The matches provide a study in contrasts and temperaments.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 2, 1998
WIMBLEDON, England -- For England, the World Cup is over, but Wimbledon has just begun.Tim Henman, the last best hope of British men's tennis, overwhelmed No. 3 seed Petr Korda, 6-3, 6-4, 6-2, yesterday to storm into the Wimbledon men's semifinals.Henman's triumph came less than 24 hours after the English soccer team was sent packing from the World Cup by Argentina on penalty kicks, in one of those glorious exits that English teams -- and players -- are famous for.The doe-eyed, hard-hitting Henman is out to change the sporting stereotype of the lovable English loser.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1997
NEW YORK -- No. 20 Greg Rusedski was the first men's quarterfinalist to move into the U.S. Open semifinals yesterday. But few seemed to care.Many fans in Arthur Ashe Stadium left after watching a wonderful 2 1/2 -hour confrontation between No. 3 seed Jana Novotna and No. 6 Lindsay Davenport. Finally, Davenport won a third-set tiebreaker to upset her doubles partner, 6-2, 4-6, 7-6 (7-5).Davenport will now play No. 1 Martina Hingis, a 6-3, 6-2 winner over No. 10 Arantxa Sanchez Vicario for the right to meet the winner of the other semifinal between fellow American Venus Williams and Romanian Irina Spirlea in Sunday's final.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 22, 1997
WIMBLEDON, England -- This is Richard Krajicek's idea of a good time at Wimbledon:One serve and a cloud of dust.Let others whine about playing -- and watching -- men's tennis on grass. The way Krajicek sees it, Wimbledon is about serving aces, bashing returns and snuffing out rallies in a hurry.That's how he won Wimbledon last year. And that's how he plans to win again this year, when the tournament opens its two-week run tomorrow at the All England Club."I understand that if the point goes quick, people think it's boring," he said.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2000
NEW YORK - Third seed Magnus Norman turned into the wind in Arthur Ashe Stadium yesterday afternoon at the U.S. Open and seemed to see all hope blow away. He had tried to be aggressive, tried to be conservative. He had even changed his dull, white shirt for a fire-engine red one in hopes of turning red hot. But nothing made any difference. Across the net, No. 14 Nicolas Kiefer, who has been forced to leave his rooms and change hotels several nights because of the United Nations Millenium Summit, had all the answers as he dispatched the Swede, 6-2, 6-7 (3-7)
SPORTS
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | June 5, 1993
PARIS -- The hitting machine vs. the running machine.That's the men's French Open final.Jim Courier, seeking his third title in a row, banged his way into tomorrow's championship by defeating Richard Krajicek, 6-1, 6-7 (2-7), 7-5, 6-2, yesterday.Sergi Bruguera, making only nine unforced errors, was too fast and too clever on the clay for Andrei Medvedev, winning, 6-0, 6-4, 6-2.Three years ago, Courier, the No. 2 seed, said he wouldn't have thought about being in three straight French finals.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 28, 1996
NEW YORK -- Richard Krajicek's first serve in yesterday's match was supposed to send Stefan Edberg a message. Instead, it was Krajicek who got the message."
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1996
WIMBLEDON, England -- Richard Krajicek reached up to the sky with a classic fluid motion and came over the top for booming serve after booming serve yesterday to become the first Dutchman to win the Wimbledon men's championship.However, the winning point, in his masterful 6-3, 6-4, 6-3 bruising of American MaliVai Washington came off a stunningly low backhand that Washington could not handle.When the ball did not come back, Krajicek went to his knees clutching his racket so hard his entire body shook.
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