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By Milton Kent | June 23, 1998
Perhaps the best news to come out of Wimbledon yesterday is that Russian Anna Kournikova will miss this year's tournament because maybe now the tennis-watching public will key in on just that, tennis, and not on Kournikova's figure.In case you've missed her, Kournikova is the Spice Girl wanna-be (call her Serving Spice), and the subject of numerous salacious magazine articles and Web sites. She would have been a focal point of television coverage, not to mention a darling of the British tabloids, if she hadn't hurt her thumb last week in a tuneup tournament win over Steffi Graf.
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2003
Anna Kournikova brought youthful glamour to women's professional tennis, but after seven full years on the WTA Tour, Kournikova has yet to win a tournament, and during 2003 she played only six matches and lost five. Glitz and glamour she has in abundance but, as Andre Agassi found out years ago, image really isn't everything. Still, that doesn't mean it doesn't have its place. And on the WTA Tour, the search for the next Kournikova, for the next leggy and shapely young woman to be, well, the next poster girl, is well under way. The tour wants to find the next pretty face to give the game the pizzazz it can't seem to generate with beautiful tennis and the interest competitive play alone evidently can't create.
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 25, 1997
WIMBLEDON, England -- They sure don't mind rushing along the new teen-agers at Wimbledon.Yesterday, 16-year-old Anna Kournikova of Russia, unseeded but hardly unknown, made her Wimbledon debut in a little out of the way spot known as Centre Court.She beat Chanda Rubin, 6-1, 6-1, and then faced the ravenous British tabloid reporters.The reporters tried to lure her into all sorts of controversies.Did she talk trash about the play of another top teen, Venus Williams?"I never say anything about players," she said.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2000
Anna Kournikova isn't coming. Pete Sampras is. That's the latest word on the Chevy Chase Bank Tennis Challenge, being held at the Baltimore Arena next Tuesday. Originally, tournament creator Pam Shriver announced Kournikova would return for the second time in two years to play former teen star and current comeback kid Jennifer Capriati. But over the past several weeks, Kournikova has complained of fatigue and nagging injuries and indicated to Shriver she wanted out. "Late Saturday night, Pete's representative returned my call and said Pete would like to come here," Shriver said.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2000
Anna Kournikova isn't coming. Pete Sampras is. That's the latest word on the Chevy Chase Bank Tennis Challenge, being held at the Baltimore Arena next Tuesday. Originally, tournament creator Pam Shriver announced Kournikova would return for the second time in two years to play former teen star and current comeback kid Jennifer Capriati. But over the past several weeks, Kournikova has complained of fatigue and nagging injuries and indicated to Shriver she wanted out. "Late Saturday night, Pete's representative returned my call and said Pete would like to come here," Shriver said.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 27, 2000
WIMBLEDON, England - What's the fuss about the enormous billboards featuring Anna Kournikova in a sports bra? And how come an unseeded player can rate front-page newspaper coverage for wearing a diamond ring the size of a baby grand piano and then turn up on Centre Court and bring Wimbledon to a halt? Must be the forehands. Yesterday, Kournikova, of Russia, staged the first upset of Wimbledon's Millennium Championships, defeating No. 10 seed Sandrine Testud, of France, 7-5, 5-7, 6-4. She then faced the predictable barrage of media questions about her looks, stardom and lack of tournament titles.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2003
Anna Kournikova brought youthful glamour to women's professional tennis, but after seven full years on the WTA Tour, Kournikova has yet to win a tournament, and during 2003 she played only six matches and lost five. Glitz and glamour she has in abundance but, as Andre Agassi found out years ago, image really isn't everything. Still, that doesn't mean it doesn't have its place. And on the WTA Tour, the search for the next Kournikova, for the next leggy and shapely young woman to be, well, the next poster girl, is well under way. The tour wants to find the next pretty face to give the game the pizzazz it can't seem to generate with beautiful tennis and the interest competitive play alone evidently can't create.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 30, 2000
S'long, Elian, y'all come back, y'heah? If the learned justices cannot agree about the late-term abortion, why should the rest of us? Giving Baltimore city School Superintendent Russo a four-year contract is as optimistic as the Orioles in 1998 giving Designated Closer Timlin the same. Should attendance become a problem, the club could always retire Cal and hire Anna Kournikova to play third base.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 4, 1997
WIMBLEDON, England -- It was supposed to be the liftoff of a great tennis rivalry.Instead, yesterday's Wimbledon women's semifinal match between Martina Hingis and Anna Kournikova was a letdown.They played like a pair of scared 16-year-olds.Still, No. 1-ranked Hingis emerged with a 6-3, 6-2 victory over Kournikova to move into tomorrow's women's final, where she'll face No. 3 Jana Novotna.Novotna cleared the semifinals by beating former doubles partner Arantxa Sanchez Vicario, 6-4, 6-2.The Hingis-Kournikova match was filled with hope and possibility.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | June 1, 1997
PARIS -- The smile is so captivating that one of the first questions Martina Hingis hears after entering a post-match interview is this:"Martina, besides your smile, what weapons do you have to win the French Open?"It is a man asking this question, and for just a moment, Hingis, 16, is disconcerted. She blushes."My smile?" she said, unable not to smile. "I have many weapons. I think you saw that today."What the crowd on Court Central saw was Hingis, the world's top women's player, sweeping No. 47 Anna Kournikova off the court in 42 minutes, 6-1, 6-3.She did it by mixing the rhythm of her game, by mixing her shots -- playing balls deep, feathering a drop shot, killing an overhead slam.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2000
Jennifer Capriati, in the midst of a rebirth on the Women's Tennis Association Tour, is returning to Baltimore after a nine-year absence. Capriati, 24, will join Anna Kournikova of Russia in the featured match of the 2000 Chevy Chase Bank Tennis Challenge. The event, presented by The Baltimore Sun, will be held Nov. 21 at Baltimore Arena. The announcement comes on the heels of Capriati's victory Sunday over Magdalena Maleeva of Bulgaria in the finals of the Seat Open in Luxembourg. It was her first title of the year and the ninth overall for Capriati, who in 1990 was the youngest player (14 years, 235 days)
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2000
In describing the headliner for this year's Chevy Chase Bank Tennis Challenge, Pam Shriver said yesterday, "What I've come to realize is that she's an extremely powerful draw." That's why Shriver, the event's founder, is excited about Anna Kournikova coming back to Baltimore a year after she defeated Lindsay Davenport in the featured match. The 19-year-old Russian with the biggest cult following in tennis has agreed to return to the charity event, which will be held again this year at Baltimore Arena on Nov. 21. The event is presented by The Sun. The event has raised an estimated $2.4 million in its first 14 years.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 30, 2000
S'long, Elian, y'all come back, y'heah? If the learned justices cannot agree about the late-term abortion, why should the rest of us? Giving Baltimore city School Superintendent Russo a four-year contract is as optimistic as the Orioles in 1998 giving Designated Closer Timlin the same. Should attendance become a problem, the club could always retire Cal and hire Anna Kournikova to play third base.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 27, 2000
WIMBLEDON, England - What's the fuss about the enormous billboards featuring Anna Kournikova in a sports bra? And how come an unseeded player can rate front-page newspaper coverage for wearing a diamond ring the size of a baby grand piano and then turn up on Centre Court and bring Wimbledon to a halt? Must be the forehands. Yesterday, Kournikova, of Russia, staged the first upset of Wimbledon's Millennium Championships, defeating No. 10 seed Sandrine Testud, of France, 7-5, 5-7, 6-4. She then faced the predictable barrage of media questions about her looks, stardom and lack of tournament titles.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | November 24, 1999
They said it was just for fun. But Lindsay Davenport and Anna Kournikova didn't play it that way.They slugged their way through three sets. They questioned calls. Argued with the umpire. Demonstrated the art of the big serve (Davenport) and the running forehand volley (Kournikova).And when it was over, it was the resilient Kournikova, the No. 12 player in the world, upsetting world No. 2 and defending champ Davenport, 6-2, 1-6, 6-1, in the Chevy Chase Bank Tennis Challenge last night at the Baltimore Arena.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1999
The door opens into the players' lounge, and there is Anna Kournikova, sitting on a couch, eating a cold-cut sandwich. She is dressed in a sweat suit. Her long, blond hair is bundled into a braided bun on the back of her head, and she looks like a typical teen-ager.Kournikova, however, is not known for being typical.The young woman, who will appear tomorrow night with No. 2-ranked Lindsay Davenport in the Chevy Chase Bank Tennis Challenge at Baltimore Arena, is the current glamour queen of professional tennis.
SPORTS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 30, 1999
PARIS -- She is not the 14-year-old who came within two matches of winning the 1990 French Open in her Grand Slam debut, charming the world with her ground strokes and precocious kid-speak, referring to Napoleon as that "little dead dude."Nor is she the troubled, angst-ridden teen-ager who had brushes with the law amid a cloud of drug use. Of course, these days, that plot would be practically lighthearted on an episode of "Dawson's Creek."Years later, 23-year-old Jennifer Capriati is beyond those snapshots.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 22, 1998
WIMBLEDON, England -- Now, Steffi Graf is an underdog. Now that she's 29 and returning from injury, she'll own the crowds just as she once owned the tournament.Her every move will be watched. Her every victory will be savored, because no one is quite sure if this is her comeback or her last stand.Today, Graf is back where she belongs, on Centre Court at Wimbledon.She will meet Spain's Gala Leon Garcia in a first-round match on what could be a day for star turns.Reigning men's champion Pete Sampras, 1992 winner Andre Agassi and Monica Seles are among those due to play today, if England's notorious summer weather produces clear skies instead of rainstorms.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1999
A year ago, tennis star Lindsay Davenport stepped in at the last minute to help Pam Shriver fill a void in the Chevy Chase Bank Tennis Challenge. This year, she'll be back with her own, personal invitation.Today, representatives of the Challenge will announce at a news conference that Davenport is back and her opponent at the Baltimore Arena on Nov. 23 will be world No. 15 Anna Kournikova."Lindsay did us the big favor last year, stepping in for Steffi [Graf]," Shriver said in a phone conversation from California, where she now lives.
SPORTS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 30, 1999
PARIS -- She is not the 14-year-old who came within two matches of winning the 1990 French Open in her Grand Slam debut, charming the world with her ground strokes and precocious kid-speak, referring to Napoleon as that "little dead dude."Nor is she the troubled, angst-ridden teen-ager who had brushes with the law amid a cloud of drug use. Of course, these days, that plot would be practically lighthearted on an episode of "Dawson's Creek."Years later, 23-year-old Jennifer Capriati is beyond those snapshots.
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